Erik Bijleveld

Summary

Affiliation: Utrecht University
Country: The Netherlands

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Adaptive reward pursuit: how effort requirements affect unconscious reward responses and conscious reward decisions
    Erik Bijleveld
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Gen 141:728-42. 2012
  2. pmc The cortisol response to anticipated intergroup interactions predicts self-reported prejudice
    Erik Bijleveld
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 7:e33681. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Unconscious reward cues increase invested effort, but do not change speed-accuracy tradeoffs
    Erik Bijleveld
    Utrecht University, Department of Psychology, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Cognition 115:330-5. 2010
  4. doi request reprint When favourites fail: tournament trophies as reward cues in tennis finals
    Erik Bijleveld
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    J Sports Sci 29:1463-70. 2011
  5. pmc Promising high monetary rewards for future task performance increases intermediate task performance
    Claire M Zedelius
    Department of Social Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 7:e42547. 2012
  6. doi request reprint Positive priming and intentional binding: eye-blink rate predicts reward information effects on the sense of agency
    Henk Aarts
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Soc Neurosci 7:105-12. 2012

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. doi request reprint Adaptive reward pursuit: how effort requirements affect unconscious reward responses and conscious reward decisions
    Erik Bijleveld
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Gen 141:728-42. 2012
    ..Moreover, consciousness supports a more sophisticated mode of reward pursuit, via which people can strategically conserve effort even further. We discuss these findings in the context of decision making, motivation, and consciousness...
  2. pmc The cortisol response to anticipated intergroup interactions predicts self-reported prejudice
    Erik Bijleveld
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 7:e33681. 2012
    ..Moreover, we explore potential moderators of this relationship (i.e., interpersonal similarity; subtle vs. blatant prejudice)...
  3. doi request reprint Unconscious reward cues increase invested effort, but do not change speed-accuracy tradeoffs
    Erik Bijleveld
    Utrecht University, Department of Psychology, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Cognition 115:330-5. 2010
    ..These findings suggest that reward cues initially boost effort regardless of whether or not people are aware of them, but affect speed-accuracy tradeoffs only when the reward information is accessible to consciousness...
  4. doi request reprint When favourites fail: tournament trophies as reward cues in tennis finals
    Erik Bijleveld
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    J Sports Sci 29:1463-70. 2011
    ..These findings support the idea that tournament trophies may distract favourites by continuously reminding them of what is at stake, and via that route may severely thwart their performance...
  5. pmc Promising high monetary rewards for future task performance increases intermediate task performance
    Claire M Zedelius
    Department of Social Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 7:e42547. 2012
    ..These results suggest that high rewards for future performance boost intermediate performance due to enhanced task preparation, and they do so regardless whether people respond to rewards in a strategic or non-strategic manner...
  6. doi request reprint Positive priming and intentional binding: eye-blink rate predicts reward information effects on the sense of agency
    Henk Aarts
    Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Soc Neurosci 7:105-12. 2012
    ..These findings suggest a possible role for striatal dopamine activity in the process by which reward-related information shapes the way people see themselves as agents...