James M McQueen

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
Country: The Netherlands

Publications

  1. ncbi Phonological versus phonetic cues in native and non-native listening: Korean and Dutch listeners' perception of Dutch and English consonants
    Taehong Cho
    Hanyang University, Division of English Language and Literature, Seoul 133 791, Korea
    J Acoust Soc Am 119:3085-96. 2006
  2. ncbi The dynamic nature of speech perception
    James M McQueen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Lang Speech 49:101-12. 2006
  3. ncbi Cleaving automatic processes from strategic biases in phonological priming
    James M McQueen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Mem Cognit 33:1185-209. 2005
  4. ncbi Tracking recognition of spoken words by tracking looks to printed words
    James M McQueen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 60:661-71. 2007
  5. pmc Foreign subtitles help but native-language subtitles harm foreign speech perception
    Holger Mitterer
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 4:e7785. 2009
  6. pmc Decoding speech perception by native and non-native speakers using single-trial electrophysiological data
    Alex Brandmeyer
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 8:e68261. 2013
  7. doi Listening to different speakers: on the time-course of perceptual compensation for vocal-tract characteristics
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, PO Box 310, 6500 AH Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Neuropsychologia 49:3831-46. 2011
  8. ncbi Speaking rate affects the perception of duration as a suprasegmental lexical-stress cue
    Eva Reinisch
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Lang Speech 54:147-65. 2011
  9. doi Processing reduced word-forms in speech perception using probabilistic knowledge about speech production
    Holger Mitterer
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Wundtlaan, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 35:244-63. 2009
  10. pmc Constraints on the processes responsible for the extrinsic normalization of vowels
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Atten Percept Psychophys 73:1195-215. 2011

Detail Information

Publications42

  1. ncbi Phonological versus phonetic cues in native and non-native listening: Korean and Dutch listeners' perception of Dutch and English consonants
    Taehong Cho
    Hanyang University, Division of English Language and Literature, Seoul 133 791, Korea
    J Acoust Soc Am 119:3085-96. 2006
    ....
  2. ncbi The dynamic nature of speech perception
    James M McQueen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Lang Speech 49:101-12. 2006
    ..These adjustments in fricative perception therefore do not depend on explicit judgments during exposure. This learning effect thus reflects automatic retuning of the interpretation of acoustic-phonetic information...
  3. ncbi Cleaving automatic processes from strategic biases in phonological priming
    James M McQueen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Mem Cognit 33:1185-209. 2005
    ..g., faster responses to related than to unrelated targets, irrespective of expectations). Although phonological priming thus has both automatic and strategic components, it is possible to cleave them apart...
  4. ncbi Tracking recognition of spoken words by tracking looks to printed words
    James M McQueen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 60:661-71. 2007
    ....
  5. pmc Foreign subtitles help but native-language subtitles harm foreign speech perception
    Holger Mitterer
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 4:e7785. 2009
    ..Native-language subtitles appear to create lexical interference, but foreign-language subtitles assist speech learning by indicating which words (and hence sounds) are being spoken...
  6. pmc Decoding speech perception by native and non-native speakers using single-trial electrophysiological data
    Alex Brandmeyer
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 8:e68261. 2013
    ..This approach could be used in extensions of the BCI paradigm to support perceptual learning during second language acquisition. ..
  7. doi Listening to different speakers: on the time-course of perceptual compensation for vocal-tract characteristics
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, PO Box 310, 6500 AH Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Neuropsychologia 49:3831-46. 2011
    ..Listeners' abilities to normalize for speaker-vocal-tract properties are for an important part the result of a process that influences representations of speech sounds early in the speech processing stream...
  8. ncbi Speaking rate affects the perception of duration as a suprasegmental lexical-stress cue
    Eva Reinisch
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Lang Speech 54:147-65. 2011
    ..These results suggest that speaking rate is used to disambiguate words and that rate-modulated stress cues are more important on initial than noninitial syllables. Speaking rate affects perception of suprasegmental information...
  9. doi Processing reduced word-forms in speech perception using probabilistic knowledge about speech production
    Holger Mitterer
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Wundtlaan, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 35:244-63. 2009
    ..We thus argue that probabilistic knowledge about the effect of following context in speech production is used prelexically in perception to help resolve lexical ambiguities caused by continuous-speech processes...
  10. pmc Constraints on the processes responsible for the extrinsic normalization of vowels
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Atten Percept Psychophys 73:1195-215. 2011
    ..Extrinsic normalization of vowels is due, at least in part, to an auditory process that may require familiarity with the spectrotemporal characteristics of speech...
  11. doi High stimulus variability in nonnative speech learning supports formation of abstract categories: evidence from Japanese geminates
    Makiko Sadakata
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, P O Box 9104 6500 HE, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 134:1324-35. 2013
    ..Variability thus helps nonnative listeners to form abstract categories rather than to enhance early acoustic analysis. ..
  12. doi Effects of native language on perceptual sensitivity to phonetic cues
    Alex Brandmeyer
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Neuroreport 23:653-7. 2012
    ....
  13. doi Possible words and fixed stress in the segmentation of Slovak speech
    Adriana Hanulikova
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 63:555-79. 2010
    ..Knowledge about what constitutes a phonologically acceptable word in a given language therefore determines whether vowelless stretches of speech are or are not treated as acceptable parts of the lexical parse...
  14. ncbi Interference of spoken word recognition through phonological priming from visual objects and printed words
    James M McQueen
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Atten Percept Psychophys 76:190-200. 2014
    ..This suggests that, by default, processing of related pictures and printed words influences how quickly we recognize spoken words. ..
  15. doi Evidence for precategorical extrinsic vowel normalization
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Wundtlaan 1, 6525 XD Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Atten Percept Psychophys 75:576-87. 2013
    ..Extrinsic vowel normalization therefore appears to be a process that takes place at least in part at a precategorical processing level...
  16. doi The bounds on flexibility in speech perception
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 6500 AH Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 36:195-211. 2010
    ....
  17. ncbi Perceptual learning in speech: stability over time
    Frank Eisner
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 119:1950-3. 2006
    ..Equivalent effects were found when listeners heard speech from other talkers in the 12 h interval, and when they had the opportunity to consolidate learning during sleep...
  18. ncbi The effect of voice onset time differences on lexical access in Dutch
    Petra M van Alphen
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 32:178-96. 2006
    ..Phonetic detail appears to influence lexical access only to the extent that it is useful: In Dutch, presence versus absence of prevoicing is more informative than amount of prevoicing...
  19. ncbi The specificity of perceptual learning in speech processing
    Frank Eisner
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Percept Psychophys 67:224-38. 2005
    ..We conclude that perceptual learning about idiosyncratic speech is applied at a segmental level and is, under these exposure conditions, talker specific...
  20. doi Foreign accent strength and listener familiarity with an accent codetermine speed of perceptual adaptation
    Marijt J Witteman
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, PO Box 310, 6500AH, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Atten Percept Psychophys 75:537-56. 2013
    ..Together, these results show that adaptation to foreign-accented speech is rapid but depends on accent strength and on listener familiarity with those strongly accented words...
  21. doi Mean-based neural coding of voices
    Attila Andics
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, PO Box 310, 6500 AH, The Netherlands
    Neuroimage 79:351-60. 2013
    ..e., voice identity) dimension. Voice recognition therefore entails at least two anatomically separable stages, each characterized by neural mechanisms that reference the central tendencies of voice categories...
  22. doi Hemispheric differences in the effects of context on vowel perception
    Matthias J Sjerps
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Wundtlaan 1, 6525 XD Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Brain Lang 120:401-5. 2012
    ..In the left hemisphere, contrastive effects are smaller and largely restricted to speech contexts...
  23. doi Positional effects in the lexical retuning of speech perception
    Alexandra Jesse
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Psychon Bull Rev 18:943-50. 2011
    ..Under these conditions, however, lexically guided retuning was position independent: It generalized across syllabic positions. Lexical retuning can thus benefit future recognition of particular sounds wherever they appear in words...
  24. doi The nature of the visual environment induces implicit biases during language-mediated visual search
    Falk Huettig
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Mem Cognit 39:1068-84. 2011
    ..The nature of the visual environment appears to induce implicit biases toward particular modes of processing during language-mediated visual search...
  25. doi Vowel devoicing and the perception of spoken Japanese words
    Anne Cutler
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:1693-703. 2009
    ..This is consistent with listeners treating consonant sequences as potential realizations of parts of existing lexical candidates wherever possible...
  26. doi Speaking rate from proximal and distal contexts is used during word segmentation
    Eva Reinisch
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 37:978-96. 2011
    ....
  27. ncbi Phonological abstraction without phonemes in speech perception
    Holger Mitterer
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Electronic address
    Cognition 129:356-61. 2013
    ..They also show that context-sensitive allophones can play a role in this process, and hence that context-insensitive phonemes are not necessary. We suggest there may be no one unit of perception. ..
  28. doi Early use of phonetic information in spoken word recognition: lexical stress drives eye movements immediately
    Eva Reinisch
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 63:772-83. 2010
    ..Furthermore, prior to segmental disambiguation, initially stressed words were stronger lexical competitors than noninitially stressed words. Listeners recognize words by immediately using all relevant information in the speech signal...
  29. ncbi Unfolding of phonetic information over time: a database of Dutch diphone perception
    Roel Smits
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Postbus 310, 6500 AH Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 113:563-74. 2003
    ..These data can be used to improve models of how acoustic-phonetic information is mapped onto the mental lexicon during speech comprehension...
  30. ncbi Adapting to foreign-accented speech: The role of delay in testing
    Marijt J Witteman
    MPI for Psycholinguistics, Wundtlaan 1, 6500AH Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2443. 2011
    ..The results will be contrasted with results from an experiment without delayed testing and related to accounts of how listeners maintain adaptation to foreign-accented speech...
  31. ncbi The modulation of lexical competition by segment duration
    Keren B Shatzman
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Psychon Bull Rev 13:966-71. 2006
    ..Lexical competition between stop- and cluster-initial words, therefore, is modulated by segment duration differences of only 30 msec...
  32. ncbi Universality versus language-specificity in listening to running speech
    Anne Cutler
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Psychol Sci 13:258-62. 2002
    ..Thisfinding suggests that the viability constraint which inhibits spurious embedded word candidates is not sensitive to language-specific word structure, but is universal...
  33. ncbi Prosodic knowledge affects the recognition of newly acquired words
    Keren B Shatzman
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Psychol Sci 17:372-7. 2006
    ..Recognition of newly acquired words is influenced by prior prosodic knowledge and is therefore not determined solely on the basis of stored episodes of those words...
  34. ncbi Segment duration as a cue to word boundaries in spoken-word recognition
    Keren B Shatzman
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Percept Psychophys 68:1-16. 2006
    ..In Experiment 2, the participants made more fixations to target pictures when the [s] was shortened than when it was lengthened. Utterance interpretation can therefore be influenced by individual segment duration alone...
  35. ncbi Neural mechanisms for voice recognition
    Attila Andics
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Neuroimage 52:1528-40. 2010
    ..Voice recognition is thus supported by neural voice spaces that are organized around flexible 'mean voice' representations...
  36. ncbi The role of prosodic boundaries in the resolution of lexical embedding in speech comprehension
    Anne Pier Salverda
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Cognition 90:51-89. 2003
    ....
  37. ncbi Bias effects in facilitatory phonological priming
    Dennis Norris
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, England
    Mem Cognit 30:399-411. 2002
    ..The nonstrategic component of phonological facilitation may reflect speech perception processes that operate prior to lexical access...
  38. ncbi Perceptual learning in speech
    Dennis Norris
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 2EF, UK
    Cogn Psychol 47:204-38. 2003
    ..In contrast to on-line feedback, lexical feedback for learning is of benefit to spoken word recognition (e.g., in adapting to a newly encountered dialect)...
  39. ncbi Phonological and conceptual activation in speech comprehension
    Dennis Norris
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK
    Cogn Psychol 53:146-93. 2006
    ..Furthermore, both of these types of representation are distinct from the long-term memory representations of word form and meaning...
  40. ncbi Lexically guided retuning of letter perception
    Dennis Norris
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 59:1505-15. 2006
    ..We argue that lexically guided learning is an efficient general strategy available for exploitation by different specific perceptual tasks...
  41. ncbi Are there really interactive processes in speech perception?
    James M McQueen
    Trends Cogn Sci 10:533; author reply 534. 2006
  42. doi Shortlist B: a Bayesian model of continuous speech recognition
    Dennis Norris
    Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK
    Psychol Rev 115:357-95. 2008
    ..The success of Shortlist B suggests that listeners make optimal Bayesian decisions during spoken-word recognition...