Michael Krützen

Summary

Affiliation: University of Zurich
Country: Switzerland

Publications

  1. pmc Cultural transmission of tool use in bottlenose dolphins
    Michael Krützen
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:8939-43. 2005
  2. ncbi 'O father: where art thou?'--Paternity assessment in an open fission-fusion society of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia
    Michael Krützen
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Mol Ecol 13:1975-90. 2004
  3. pmc Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free-living dolphin population
    Celine H Frère
    School of Biological Earth and Ecological Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:19949-54. 2010
  4. pmc Contrasting relatedness patterns in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) with different alliance strategies
    Michael Krützen
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 270:497-502. 2003
  5. pmc Inbreeding tolerance and fitness costs in wild bottlenose dolphins
    Celine H Frère
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2667-73. 2010
  6. pmc Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins
    Anna M Kopps
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia, Evolutionary Genetics Group, Anthropological Institute and Museum, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich 8057, Switzerland, Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit, Centre for Fish, Fisheries and Aquatic Ecosystems Research, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20133245. 2014
  7. pmc Cultural transmission of tool use by Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) provides access to a novel foraging niche
    Michael Krützen
    Evolutionary Genetics Group, Anthropological Institute and Museum, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich 8057, Switzerland, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK, Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia, Marine Scotland Science, Marine Laboratory, PO Box 101, 375 Victoria Road, Aberdeen AB11 9DB, UK, Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20140374. 2014

Collaborators

  • Janet Mann
  • Richard Connor
  • Celine H Frère
  • Anna M Kopps
  • William B Sherwin
  • Lars Bejder
  • Corinne Y Ackermann
  • Simon J Allen
  • Patrick Ward

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc Cultural transmission of tool use in bottlenose dolphins
    Michael Krützen
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:8939-43. 2005
    ....
  2. ncbi 'O father: where art thou?'--Paternity assessment in an open fission-fusion society of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia
    Michael Krützen
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Mol Ecol 13:1975-90. 2004
    ..01). Our study suggests that the reproductive success of both allied males, and of nonallied juveniles, needs to be incorporated into an adaptive framework that seeks to explain alliance formation in male bottlenose dolphins...
  3. pmc Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free-living dolphin population
    Celine H Frère
    School of Biological Earth and Ecological Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:19949-54. 2010
    ..Therefore, our study represents a major methodological advance, and provides critical insights into the interplay of genetic and social parameters of fitness...
  4. pmc Contrasting relatedness patterns in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) with different alliance strategies
    Michael Krützen
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 270:497-502. 2003
    ..Thus, within one population and one sex, it appears that there may be simultaneous operation of more than one mode of group formation...
  5. pmc Inbreeding tolerance and fitness costs in wild bottlenose dolphins
    Celine H Frère
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2667-73. 2010
    ....
  6. pmc Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins
    Anna M Kopps
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia, Evolutionary Genetics Group, Anthropological Institute and Museum, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich 8057, Switzerland, Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit, Centre for Fish, Fisheries and Aquatic Ecosystems Research, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20133245. 2014
    ....
  7. pmc Cultural transmission of tool use by Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) provides access to a novel foraging niche
    Michael Krützen
    Evolutionary Genetics Group, Anthropological Institute and Museum, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich 8057, Switzerland, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK, Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia, Marine Scotland Science, Marine Laboratory, PO Box 101, 375 Victoria Road, Aberdeen AB11 9DB, UK, Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20140374. 2014
    ..Our results indicate that sponge use by bottlenose dolphins is linked to significant differences in diet. It appears that cultural transmission of tool use in dolphins, as in humans, allows the exploitation of an otherwise unused niche. ..