Beate Ditzen

Summary

Affiliation: University of Zurich
Country: Switzerland

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Intranasal oxytocin increases positive communication and reduces cortisol levels during couple conflict
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Biol Psychiatry 65:728-31. 2009
  2. pmc Sex-specific effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic nervous system and emotional responses to couple conflict
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Binzmuhlestrasse 14 Box 26, CH 8050 Zurich, Switzerland
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 8:897-902. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Assisting couples to develop healthy relationships: effects of couples relationship education on cortisol
    Beate Ditzen
    University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Zurich, Switzerland
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 36:597-607. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Dyadic coping, insecure attachment, and cortisol stress recovery following experimentally induced stress
    Nathalie Meuwly
    Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    J Fam Psychol 26:937-47. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Testosterone and relationship quality across the transition to fatherhood
    Tiziana Perini
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Switzerland
    Biol Psychol 90:186-91. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects of different kinds of couple interaction on cortisol and heart rate responses to stress in women
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Binzmuhlestrasse 14 Box 26, CH 8050 Zurich, Switzerland
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 32:565-74. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Positive couple interactions and daily cortisol: on the stress-protecting role of intimacy
    Beate Ditzen
    Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Institute of Psychology, Zurich, Switzerland
    Psychosom Med 70:883-9. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Adult attachment and social support interact to reduce psychological but not cortisol responses to stress
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    J Psychosom Res 64:479-86. 2008
  9. doi request reprint Increased psychological and attenuated cortisol and alpha-amylase responses to acute psychosocial stress in female patients with borderline personality disorder
    Urs M Nater
    University of Zurich, Institute of Psychology, Dept of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Switzerland
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 35:1565-72. 2010
  10. doi request reprint Sensation seeking in fathers: the impact on testosterone and paternal investment
    Tiziana Perini
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, CH 8044 Zurich, Switzerland
    Horm Behav 61:191-5. 2012

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. doi request reprint Intranasal oxytocin increases positive communication and reduces cortisol levels during couple conflict
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Biol Psychiatry 65:728-31. 2009
    ..However, to date there have been no studies investigating the effects of central oxytocin mechanisms on behavior and physiology in human couple interaction...
  2. pmc Sex-specific effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic nervous system and emotional responses to couple conflict
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Binzmuhlestrasse 14 Box 26, CH 8050 Zurich, Switzerland
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 8:897-902. 2013
    ..Our results imply sex-specific effects of oxytocin on sympathetic activity, to negative couple interaction, with the neuropeptide reducing sAA responses and emotional arousal in women while increasing them in men. ..
  3. doi request reprint Assisting couples to develop healthy relationships: effects of couples relationship education on cortisol
    Beate Ditzen
    University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Zurich, Switzerland
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 36:597-607. 2011
    ..We considered cortisol to be of particular interest in this context, as it mediates endocrine and immune responses to stress, and thus might influence couples' health...
  4. doi request reprint Dyadic coping, insecure attachment, and cortisol stress recovery following experimentally induced stress
    Nathalie Meuwly
    Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    J Fam Psychol 26:937-47. 2012
    ..This study highlights the value of examining the interplay between partners' behaviors and attachment orientations in order to understand the impact of stress on close relationships and partners' health...
  5. doi request reprint Testosterone and relationship quality across the transition to fatherhood
    Tiziana Perini
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Switzerland
    Biol Psychol 90:186-91. 2012
    ..We interpret our results as being in line with the "challenge hypothesis" in humans, according to which T levels are positively associated with mating effort and negatively related to paternal activities...
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects of different kinds of couple interaction on cortisol and heart rate responses to stress in women
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Binzmuhlestrasse 14 Box 26, CH 8050 Zurich, Switzerland
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 32:565-74. 2007
    ..More importantly, these findings imply a direct protective effect of touch on stress-related neurobiological systems as a possible underlying mechanism of health beneficial effects of positive couple interaction...
  7. doi request reprint Positive couple interactions and daily cortisol: on the stress-protecting role of intimacy
    Beate Ditzen
    Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Institute of Psychology, Zurich, Switzerland
    Psychosom Med 70:883-9. 2008
    ..To determine whether intimacy might be associated with reduced daily salivary cortisol levels in couples, thereby adding to the epidemiologic literature on reduced health burden in happy couples...
  8. doi request reprint Adult attachment and social support interact to reduce psychological but not cortisol responses to stress
    Beate Ditzen
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    J Psychosom Res 64:479-86. 2008
    ..The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adult attachment and social support on psychological and endocrine responses to psychosocial stress...
  9. doi request reprint Increased psychological and attenuated cortisol and alpha-amylase responses to acute psychosocial stress in female patients with borderline personality disorder
    Urs M Nater
    University of Zurich, Institute of Psychology, Dept of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Switzerland
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 35:1565-72. 2010
    ..The objective was to assess both psychological and endocrinological responses to a standardized psychosocial stressor in female BPD patients and healthy controls...
  10. doi request reprint Sensation seeking in fathers: the impact on testosterone and paternal investment
    Tiziana Perini
    Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, CH 8044 Zurich, Switzerland
    Horm Behav 61:191-5. 2012
    ..These data suggest that adaptation processes of the transition to fatherhood are influenced by individual differences in personality traits...
  11. doi request reprint Effects of orthostasis on endocrine responses to psychosocial stress
    Urs M Nater
    Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Biopsychology, Philipps University of Marburg, Germany Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zurich, Switzerland Electronic address
    Int J Psychophysiol 90:341-6. 2013
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Psychobiology of social support: The social dimension of stress buffering
    Beate Ditzen
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 32:149-62. 2014
    ..Thus, theories of socially-driven emotional learning and memory, as presented in this review, might eventually lead to psychobiology-based treatment concepts for mental disorders involving social deficits. ..