Eric Warrant

Summary

Affiliation: Lund University
Country: Sweden

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Visual ecology: hiding in the dark
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 17:R209-11. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Nocturnal bees
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 17:R991-2. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Seeing in the dark: vision and visual behaviour in nocturnal bees and wasps
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 211:1737-46. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Vision in the dimmest habitats on earth
    Eric Warrant
    Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 190:765-89. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Vision in the deep sea
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 79:671-712. 2004
  6. doi request reprint Mammalian vision: rods are a bargain
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 19:R69-71. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Nocturnal vision and landmark orientation in a tropical halictid bee
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 14:1309-18. 2004
  8. doi request reprint Polarisation vision: beetles see circularly polarised light
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Sölvegatan 35, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 20:R610-2. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Visual orientation and navigation in nocturnal arthropods
    Eric Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden
    Brain Behav Evol 75:156-73. 2010
  10. doi request reprint Dung beetles ignore landmarks for straight-line orientation
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Biology, Lund Vision Group, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 199:17-23. 2013

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. ncbi request reprint Visual ecology: hiding in the dark
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 17:R209-11. 2007
    ..The ability of many animals to camouflage themselves against a background is a well-known daytime phenomenon. Now it has even been found to occur at night, highlighting the reality of nocturnal visual predation...
  2. ncbi request reprint Nocturnal bees
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 17:R991-2. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Seeing in the dark: vision and visual behaviour in nocturnal bees and wasps
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 211:1737-46. 2008
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Vision in the dimmest habitats on earth
    Eric Warrant
    Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 190:765-89. 2004
    ..The same is certainly true of deep-sea animals, as future research will no doubt reveal...
  5. ncbi request reprint Vision in the deep sea
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 79:671-712. 2004
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Mammalian vision: rods are a bargain
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 19:R69-71. 2009
    ..But in brighter light, rods become energetically 'cheaper' than cones, which might explain the evolution of the vertebrate duplex retina...
  7. ncbi request reprint Nocturnal vision and landmark orientation in a tropical halictid bee
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 14:1309-18. 2004
    ..The insensitive optics of apposition eyes are not well suited for nocturnal vision. How well then do nocturnal bees and wasps see? What optical and neural adaptations have they evolved for nocturnal vision?..
  8. doi request reprint Polarisation vision: beetles see circularly polarised light
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Sölvegatan 35, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 20:R610-2. 2010
    ..It has long been known that the iridescent cuticle of many scarab beetles reflects circularly polarised light. It now turns out that scarabs can also see this light, potentially using it as a covert visual signal...
  9. doi request reprint Visual orientation and navigation in nocturnal arthropods
    Eric Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden
    Brain Behav Evol 75:156-73. 2010
    ..These four classes of orientation--and their visual basis--are reviewed here, with special emphasis given to the best-understood animal systems that are representative of each...
  10. doi request reprint Dung beetles ignore landmarks for straight-line orientation
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Biology, Lund Vision Group, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 199:17-23. 2013
    ..To our knowledge, this is the only animal with a visual compass system that ignores the extra orientation precision that landmarks can offer...
  11. pmc Hornets can fly at night without obvious adaptations of eyes and ocelli
    Almut Kelber
    Lund Vision Group, Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
    PLoS ONE 6:e21892. 2011
    ..We propose that neural pooling strategies and behavioural adaptations precede anatomical adaptations in the eyes and ocelli when insects with apposition compound eyes turn to dim light activity...
  12. pmc Nocturnal insects use optic flow for flight control
    Emily Baird
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
    Biol Lett 7:499-501. 2011
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Vision and visual navigation in nocturnal insects
    Eric Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:239-54. 2011
    ..Exactly where in the visual system this summation takes place, and the nature of the neural circuitry that is involved, is currently unknown but provides a promising avenue for future research...
  14. doi request reprint Visual reliability and information rate in the retina of a nocturnal bee
    Rikard Frederiksen
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 18:349-53. 2008
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Visual ecology of Indian carpenter bees I: light intensities and flight activity
    Hema Somanathan
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology Zoology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 194:97-107. 2008
    ..tranquebarica in extremely dim light. We hypothesise that additional adaptations must confer extreme nocturnality in X. tranquebarica...
  16. ncbi request reprint Anatomical and physiological evidence for polarisation vision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis
    Birgit Greiner
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 193:591-600. 2007
    ..Intracellular recordings within the dorsal rim area show very high polarisation sensitivity and a sensitivity peak within the ultraviolet part of the spectrum...
  17. doi request reprint Visual sensitivity in the crepuscular owl butterfly Caligo memnon and the diurnal blue morpho Morpho peleides: a clue to explain the evolution of nocturnal apposition eyes?
    Rikard Frederiksen
    Lund University, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 211:844-51. 2008
    ..memnon than in M. peleides, showing that adaptations that improve sensitivity can be found not only in nocturnal apposition eyes, but also on a smaller scale in crepuscular apposition eyes...
  18. ncbi request reprint Form vision in the insect dorsal ocelli: an anatomical and optical analysis of the dragonfly median ocellus
    Richard P Berry
    Centre for Visual Sciences, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Vision Res 47:1394-409. 2007
    ..It is concluded that dragonfly ocelli employ a number of simple, yet elegant, anatomical and optical strategies to ensure high sensitivity, fast transduction speed, wide fields of views and a modicum of spatial resolving power...
  19. ncbi request reprint Scotopic colour vision in nocturnal hawkmoths
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Nature 419:922-5. 2002
    ..Taken together, our results show that colour vision occurs at nocturnal intensities in a biologically relevant context...
  20. ncbi request reprint Superior underwater vision in a human population of sea gypsies
    Anna Gislén
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, Sweden
    Curr Biol 13:833-6. 2003
    ..This extreme reaction-which is routine in Moken children-is completely absent in European children. Because they are completely dependent on the sea, the Moken are very likely to derive great benefit from this strategy...
  21. ncbi request reprint Animal behaviour: insect orientation to polarized moonlight
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Nature 424:33. 2003
  22. ncbi request reprint Retinal and optical adaptations for nocturnal vision in the halictid bee Megalopta genalis
    Birgit Greiner
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Cell Tissue Res 316:377-90. 2004
    ..New evidence suggests that additional neuronal spatial summation within the first optic ganglion, the lamina, is involved...
  23. pmc Lunar orientation in a beetle
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 271:361-5. 2004
    ..7 and 12.9, similar to values recorded in diurnal navigators. These results agree with earlier results suggesting that the detection and analysis of polarized skylight is similar in diurnal and nocturnal insects...
  24. ncbi request reprint Neural organisation in the first optic ganglion of the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis
    Birgit Greiner
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Cell Tissue Res 318:429-37. 2004
    ..genalis indicates a potential role for these neurons in the spatial summation of photons from large groups of ommatidia. This specific adaptation in the nocturnal bee could significantly improve reliability of vision in dim light...
  25. ncbi request reprint Warm eyes provide superior vision in swordfishes
    Kerstin A Fritsches
    Vision, Touch and Hearing Research Centre, Queensland Brain Institute, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    Curr Biol 15:55-8. 2005
    ..The enhanced temporal resolution allowed by heated eyes provides warm-blooded and highly visual oceanic predators, such as swordfishes, tunas, and sharks, with a crucial advantage over their agile, cold-blooded prey...
  26. ncbi request reprint A neural network to improve dim-light vision? Dendritic fields of first-order interneurons in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis
    Birgit Greiner
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Cell Tissue Res 322:313-20. 2005
    ..Theoretical and future physiological work should further elucidate the roles that this lateral spreading plays to improve dim-light vision in nocturnal insects...
  27. ncbi request reprint Visual summation in night-flying sweat bees: a theoretical study
    Jamie Carroll Theobald
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Helgonavagen 3, Lund University, S 223 62, Lund, Sweden
    Vision Res 46:2298-309. 2006
    ..Improved reliability costs acuity, but dark adapted bees already suffer optical blurring, and summation further degrades vision only slightly...
  28. ncbi request reprint Visual training improves underwater vision in children
    Anna Gislén
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Vision Res 46:3443-50. 2006
    ..The achieved performance can be explained by the combined effect of pupil constriction and strong accommodation...
  29. ncbi request reprint A "bright zone" in male hoverfly (Eristalis tenax) eyes and associated faster motion detection and increased contrast sensitivity
    Andrew D Straw
    Discipline of Physiology, School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
    J Exp Biol 209:4339-54. 2006
    ..Additionally, local neural properties vary across the visual world in a way not expected if HS cells serve purely as matched filters to measure yaw-induced visual motion...
  30. ncbi request reprint Form vision in the insect dorsal ocelli: an anatomical and optical analysis of the Locust Ocelli
    Richard P Berry
    Centre for Visual Sciences, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Vision Res 47:1382-93. 2007
    ..Contrary to the classical view it is concluded that some capacity for resolution is present in the locust ocelli...
  31. ncbi request reprint Visual field structure in the Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae): dimensions and regional variation in acuity
    Ronald L Rutowski
    Department of Biology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 1501, USA
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 188:1-12. 2002
    ..This study also suggests that perched males direct their most acute vision where females are likely to appear but show no eye modifications that appear clearly related to a mate-locating tactic...
  32. ncbi request reprint The eyes of Macrosoma sp. (Lepidoptera: Hedyloidea): a nocturnal butterfly with superposition optics
    Jayne E Yack
    Department of Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada
    Arthropod Struct Dev 36:11-22. 2007
    ..The results are discussed in relation to the evolution of lepidopteran eyes, and the sensory ecology of this poorly understood butterfly superfamily...
  33. ncbi request reprint Flight performance in night-flying sweat bees suffers at low light levels
    Jamie Carroll Theobald
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Helgonavagen 3, Lund University, S 223 62, Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 210:4034-42. 2007
    ..These data agree well with the premise that Megalopta uses visual summation, sacrificing acuity in order to see and fly at the very dimmest light intensities that its visual system allows...