M Dacke

Summary

Affiliation: Lund University
Country: Sweden

Publications

  1. pmc Lunar orientation in a beetle
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 271:361-5. 2004
  2. pmc How dim is dim? Precision of the celestial compass in moonlight and sunlight
    M Dacke
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:697-702. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Vision and visual navigation in nocturnal insects
    Eric Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:239-54. 2011
  4. pmc Fog-basking behaviour and water collection efficiency in Namib Desert Darkling beetles
    Thomas Nørgaard
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Sölvegatan 35, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Front Zool 7:23. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Two odometers in honeybees?
    M Dacke
    ARC Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia
    J Exp Biol 211:3281-6. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Animal behaviour: insect orientation to polarized moonlight
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Nature 424:33. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Twilight orientation to polarised light in the crepuscular dung beetle Scarabaeus zambesianus
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 206:1535-43. 2003
  8. doi request reprint Evidence for counting in insects
    Marie Dacke
    ARC Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, P O Box 475, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia
    Anim Cogn 11:683-9. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Honeybee navigation: distance estimation in the third dimension
    M Dacke
    Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, PO Box 475, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    J Exp Biol 210:845-53. 2007
  10. pmc Honeybee navigation: following routes using polarized-light cues
    P Kraft
    Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:703-8. 2011

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. pmc Lunar orientation in a beetle
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 271:361-5. 2004
    ..7 and 12.9, similar to values recorded in diurnal navigators. These results agree with earlier results suggesting that the detection and analysis of polarized skylight is similar in diurnal and nocturnal insects...
  2. pmc How dim is dim? Precision of the celestial compass in moonlight and sunlight
    M Dacke
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:697-702. 2011
    ..This indicates that, in nocturnal species, the sensitivity of the optical polarization compass can be greatly increased without any loss of precision...
  3. doi request reprint Vision and visual navigation in nocturnal insects
    Eric Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:239-54. 2011
    ..Exactly where in the visual system this summation takes place, and the nature of the neural circuitry that is involved, is currently unknown but provides a promising avenue for future research...
  4. pmc Fog-basking behaviour and water collection efficiency in Namib Desert Darkling beetles
    Thomas Nørgaard
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Sölvegatan 35, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Front Zool 7:23. 2010
    ..Here we describe the beetles' fog-basking behaviour, the details of their elytra structures, and determine how efficient their dorsal surface areas are at harvesting water from fog...
  5. doi request reprint Two odometers in honeybees?
    M Dacke
    ARC Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia
    J Exp Biol 211:3281-6. 2008
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Animal behaviour: insect orientation to polarized moonlight
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Nature 424:33. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Twilight orientation to polarised light in the crepuscular dung beetle Scarabaeus zambesianus
    Marie Dacke
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 206:1535-43. 2003
    ..The fan-shaped arrangement of receptors over the dorsal rim area was previously believed to be an adaptation to polarised light analysis, but here we argue that it is simply a consequence of the way that the eye is built...
  8. doi request reprint Evidence for counting in insects
    Marie Dacke
    ARC Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, P O Box 475, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia
    Anim Cogn 11:683-9. 2008
    ..It appears that bees can navigate to food sources by maintaining a running count of prominent landmarks that are passed en route, provided this number does not exceed four...
  9. ncbi request reprint Honeybee navigation: distance estimation in the third dimension
    M Dacke
    Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, PO Box 475, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    J Exp Biol 210:845-53. 2007
    ..These findings raise important questions about how honeybee recruits navigate reliably to find the food sources that are advertised by scouts...
  10. pmc Honeybee navigation: following routes using polarized-light cues
    P Kraft
    Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:703-8. 2011
    ..The results show that bees can learn this task, thus demonstrating directly, and for the first time, that bees are indeed capable of using the polarized-light information in the sky as a compass to steer their way to a food source...
  11. doi request reprint Honeybee navigation: critically examining the role of the polarization compass
    C Evangelista
    Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 369:20130037. 2014
    ..Furthermore, they deal with the directional ambiguity that is inherent in polarized light by signalling all of the possible locations of the food source in their dances, thus maximizing the chances of recruitment to it. ..
  12. doi request reprint Visual orientation and navigation in nocturnal arthropods
    Eric Warrant
    Department of Biology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden
    Brain Behav Evol 75:156-73. 2010
    ..These four classes of orientation--and their visual basis--are reviewed here, with special emphasis given to the best-understood animal systems that are representative of each...
  13. ncbi request reprint Visual training improves underwater vision in children
    Anna Gislén
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Vision Res 46:3443-50. 2006
    ..The achieved performance can be explained by the combined effect of pupil constriction and strong accommodation...
  14. doi request reprint Minimum viewing angle for visually guided ground speed control in bumblebees
    Emily Baird
    Lund University, Department of Biology, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 213:1625-32. 2010
    ..By measuring optic flow over a visual field that has a low minimum viewing angle, bumblebees are able to detect and respond to changes in the proximity of the environment well before they are encountered...
  15. doi request reprint Bearing selection in ball-rolling dung beetles: is it constant?
    Emily Baird
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, 22362, Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 196:801-6. 2010
    ..This strategy allows beetles to make an efficient escape from the dung pile while minimizing the chance of encountering competition...
  16. ncbi request reprint Superior underwater vision in a human population of sea gypsies
    Anna Gislén
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, Sweden
    Curr Biol 13:833-6. 2003
    ..This extreme reaction-which is routine in Moken children-is completely absent in European children. Because they are completely dependent on the sea, the Moken are very likely to derive great benefit from this strategy...
  17. doi request reprint The moment before touchdown: landing manoeuvres of the honeybee Apis mellifera
    C Evangelista
    Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia
    J Exp Biol 213:262-70. 2010
    ..Touchdown on inverted surfaces is most likely triggered by a mechanosensory signal from the antennae. Evidently, bees use a landing strategy that is flexibly tailored to the varying topography of the terrain...
  18. ncbi request reprint A specialized dorsal rim area for polarized light detection in the compound eye of the scarab beetle Pachysoma striatum
    M Dacke
    Department of Zoology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 188:211-6. 2002
    ..We argue that in this insect an optically unspecialised area for polarized light detection allows it not be used exclusively for polarized light navigation...
  19. ncbi request reprint Polarized light detection in spiders
    M Dacke
    Department of Zoology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 54 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 204:2481-90. 2001
    ..Built-in polarizers help to improve signal purity. Similar organisation in the eyes of several other spider families suggests that these two mechanisms are not restricted to only a few families...
  20. doi request reprint The role of the sun in the celestial compass of dung beetles
    M Dacke
    Department of Biology, Lund Vision Group, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 369:20130036. 2014
    ..In conclusion, ball-rolling dung beetles possess a dynamic celestial compass system in which the orientation precision and the relative influence of the solar compass cues change over the course of the day. ..
  21. ncbi request reprint Visual cues used by ball-rolling dung beetles for orientation
    Marcus Byrne
    Ecophysiological Studies Research Group, School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, South Africa
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 189:411-8. 2003
    ..It is probable that phototactic orientation using the sun, which is widespread amongst arthropods, has been incorporated in the straight-line foraging behaviour that has evolved in ball-rolling dung beetles...
  22. ncbi request reprint Eye structure correlates with distinct foraging-bout timing in primitive ants
    Birgit Greiner
    Curr Biol 17:R879-80. 2007