A Kelber

Summary

Country: Sweden

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Polarisation-dependent colour vision in Papilio butterflies
    A Kelber
    Department of Zoology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 204:2469-80. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Scotopic colour vision in nocturnal hawkmoths
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Nature 419:922-5. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Sugar preferences and feeding strategies in the hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum
    A Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 189:661-6. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Color discrimination in the red range with only one long-wavelength sensitive opsin
    Guillermo Zaccardi
    Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 209:1944-55. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Colour preferences influences odour learning in the hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum
    Anna Balkenius
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Naturwissenschaften 93:255-8. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Crepuscular and nocturnal illumination and its effects on color perception by the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:789-800. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint The relative importance of olfaction and vision in a diurnal and a nocturnal hawkmoth
    Anna Balkenius
    Vision Group Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 192:431-7. 2006
  8. pmc Alternative use of chromatic and achromatic cues in a hawkmoth
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Zoology Building, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2143-7. 2005
  9. pmc Nocturnal colour vision in geckos
    Lina S V Roth
    University of Lund, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S485-7. 2004
  10. pmc Pattern discrimination in a hawkmoth: innate preferences, learning performance and ecology
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22642 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 269:2573-7. 2002

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. ncbi request reprint Polarisation-dependent colour vision in Papilio butterflies
    A Kelber
    Department of Zoology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 204:2469-80. 2001
    ..and what adaptational value such a system might have for the butterflies. Finally, we give examples for other eyes that have a similar structure...
  2. ncbi request reprint Scotopic colour vision in nocturnal hawkmoths
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Nature 419:922-5. 2002
    ..Taken together, our results show that colour vision occurs at nocturnal intensities in a biologically relevant context...
  3. ncbi request reprint Sugar preferences and feeding strategies in the hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum
    A Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 189:661-6. 2003
    ..A week later they chose yellow more frequently than blue indicating that they had learned to associate a colour with the preferred type of sugar...
  4. ncbi request reprint Color discrimination in the red range with only one long-wavelength sensitive opsin
    Guillermo Zaccardi
    Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 209:1944-55. 2006
    ..The comparison of the signals between the two new receptor types makes color discrimination in the red range possible. To our knowledge, this is the first behavioral proof of color vision based on receptors expressing the same opsin...
  5. ncbi request reprint Colour preferences influences odour learning in the hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum
    Anna Balkenius
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Naturwissenschaften 93:255-8. 2006
    ..stellatarum can use more than one modality in their foraging behaviour and that the system is plastic. By manipulating the preferences for the different colours, their influence on odour learning could be changed...
  6. ncbi request reprint Crepuscular and nocturnal illumination and its effects on color perception by the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:789-800. 2006
    ..Given this, color vision may be more common in crepuscular and nocturnal species than previously considered...
  7. ncbi request reprint The relative importance of olfaction and vision in a diurnal and a nocturnal hawkmoth
    Anna Balkenius
    Vision Group Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 192:431-7. 2006
    ..Since a nocturnal lifestyle is ancestral for sphingids, the diurnal species, M. stellatarum, has evolved from nocturnal moths that primarily used olfaction. During bright daylight visual cues may have became more important than odour...
  8. pmc Alternative use of chromatic and achromatic cues in a hawkmoth
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Zoology Building, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2143-7. 2005
    ..e. moths do not learn to choose the longer or shorter of two wavelengths, but it is possible that they learn to choose the darker or brighter shade of a colour, and thereby its relative intensities...
  9. pmc Nocturnal colour vision in geckos
    Lina S V Roth
    University of Lund, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S485-7. 2004
    ..Experiments were performed at 0.002 cd m(-2), a light intensity similar to dim moonlight. We conclude that nocturnal geckos can use cone-based colour vision at very dim light levels when humans rely on colour-blind rod vision...
  10. pmc Pattern discrimination in a hawkmoth: innate preferences, learning performance and ecology
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22642 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Biol Sci 269:2573-7. 2002
    ..Hovering pollinators strongly depend on these guides and should therefore: (i). have rigid pattern preferences; and (ii). not be motivated to abolish these preferences as easily as their innate preferences for colours...
  11. ncbi request reprint Animal colour vision--behavioural tests and physiological concepts
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 78:81-118. 2003
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Nocturnal vision and landmark orientation in a tropical halictid bee
    Eric J Warrant
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Zoology Building, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    Curr Biol 14:1309-18. 2004
    ..The insensitive optics of apposition eyes are not well suited for nocturnal vision. How well then do nocturnal bees and wasps see? What optical and neural adaptations have they evolved for nocturnal vision?..
  13. ncbi request reprint Colour constancy in diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths
    Anna Balkenius
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 207:3307-16. 2004
    ..Even if colour constancy can be explained by a von Kries adaptation mechanism, the fact that the animals discriminate between different illuminations indicates that some additional process must be involved...
  14. ncbi request reprint Nocturnal colour vision--not as rare as we might think
    Almut Kelber
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 209:781-8. 2006
    ..It can be expected that nocturnal animals other than moths and geckos make use of the highly reliable colour signals in dim light...
  15. ncbi request reprint Colour perception in a dichromat
    Lina S V Roth
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Vision Group, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, S 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Exp Biol 210:2795-800. 2007
    ..This study suggests that dichromats perceive their chromatic space as a continuous scale of colours, treating the colour at the neutral point as any other colour they can distinguish...
  16. ncbi request reprint Brightness discrimination in the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina)
    Christine Scholtyssek
    General Zoology and Neurobiology, University of Bochum, ND 6 33, D 44780 Bochum, Germany
    Vision Res 48:96-103. 2008
    ..The calculated Weber fraction is 0.14. This result indicates that the brightness discrimination ability of the harbor seal is comparable to that of humans...
  17. ncbi request reprint Visual ecology of Indian carpenter bees I: light intensities and flight activity
    Hema Somanathan
    Department of Cell and Organism Biology Zoology, Lund University, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 194:97-107. 2008
    ..tranquebarica in extremely dim light. We hypothesise that additional adaptations must confer extreme nocturnality in X. tranquebarica...
  18. doi request reprint The lycaenid butterfly Polyommatus icarus uses a duplicated blue opsin to see green
    Marilou P Sison-Mangus
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:361-9. 2008
    ..Our results suggest that lateral filtering pigments may not always influence color vision in insects...
  19. doi request reprint Why do Manduca sexta feed from white flowers? Innate and learnt colour preferences in a hawkmoth
    Joaquín Goyret
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
    Naturwissenschaften 95:569-76. 2008
    ....