M Sponheimer

Summary

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Do "savanna" chimpanzees consume C4 resources?
    M Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, 80309, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:128-33. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Differential resource utilization by extant great apes and australopithecines: towards solving the C4 conundrum
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:27-34. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Sr/Ca and early hominin diets revisited: new data from modern and fossil tooth enamel
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:147-56. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Hominins, sedges, and termites: new carbon isotope data from the Sterkfontein valley and Kruger National Park
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:301-12. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Turnover of stable carbon isotopes in the muscle, liver, and breath CO2 of alpacas (Lama pacos)
    M Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 20:1395-9. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Combining isotopic and ecomorphological data to refine bovid paleodietary reconstruction: a case study from the Makapansgat Limeworks hominin locality
    M Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 1414, USA
    J Hum Evol 36:705-18. 1999
  7. ncbi request reprint Turnover of carbon isotopes in tail hair and breath CO2 of horses fed an isotopically varied diet
    L K Ayliffe
    Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Oecologia 139:11-22. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Isotopic evidence for dietary variability in the early hominin Paranthropus robustus
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Science 314:980-2. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Craniofacial biomechanics and functional and dietary inferences in hominin paleontology
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:293-308. 2010
  10. doi request reprint Using carbon isotopes to track dietary change in modern, historical, and ancient primates
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:661-70. 2009

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. ncbi request reprint Do "savanna" chimpanzees consume C4 resources?
    M Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, 80309, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:128-33. 2006
    ..This trophic flexibility, or willingness to consume C(4) savanna resources, may make Papio a more profitable ecological analog for australopiths than chimpanzees...
  2. ncbi request reprint Differential resource utilization by extant great apes and australopithecines: towards solving the C4 conundrum
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:27-34. 2003
    ..Here we discuss which C(4) resources were most likely consumed by australopithecines, as well as the potential nutritional, physiological, and social consequences of eating these foods...
  3. ncbi request reprint Sr/Ca and early hominin diets revisited: new data from modern and fossil tooth enamel
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:147-56. 2005
    ..The consumption of underground resources or insects are among the possible explanations for the highly elevated Sr/Ca in Australopithecus...
  4. ncbi request reprint Hominins, sedges, and termites: new carbon isotope data from the Sterkfontein valley and Kruger National Park
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:301-12. 2005
    ..Lastly, we suggest that the consumption of C4 foods is a fundamental hominin trait that, along with bipedalism, allowed australopiths to pioneer increasingly open and seasonal environments...
  5. ncbi request reprint Turnover of stable carbon isotopes in the muscle, liver, and breath CO2 of alpacas (Lama pacos)
    M Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 20:1395-9. 2006
    ..In contrast, breath CO2 turnover does not scale readily with body mass. We also note that the breath CO2 and liver data are better described using a multiple-pool exponential decay model than a single-pool model...
  6. ncbi request reprint Combining isotopic and ecomorphological data to refine bovid paleodietary reconstruction: a case study from the Makapansgat Limeworks hominin locality
    M Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 1414, USA
    J Hum Evol 36:705-18. 1999
    ..Gazella vanhoepeni and Aepyceros sp., however, were almost exclusive browsers, and not mixed feeders like their living counterparts...
  7. ncbi request reprint Turnover of carbon isotopes in tail hair and breath CO2 of horses fed an isotopically varied diet
    L K Ayliffe
    Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Oecologia 139:11-22. 2004
    ..Consequently, the isotope composition of blood bicarbonate appears to be much more responsive to dietary isotope changes, whereas the amino acids in the blood exhibit considerable isotopic inertia...
  8. ncbi request reprint Isotopic evidence for dietary variability in the early hominin Paranthropus robustus
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Science 314:980-2. 2006
    ..8 million years ago, savanna-based foods such as grasses or sedges or animals eating these foods made up an important but highly variable part of its diet...
  9. doi request reprint Craniofacial biomechanics and functional and dietary inferences in hominin paleontology
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:293-308. 2010
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Using carbon isotopes to track dietary change in modern, historical, and ancient primates
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:661-70. 2009
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Indications of habitat association of Australopithecus robustus in the Bloubank Valley, South Africa
    Darryl J De Ruiter
    Department of Anthropology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 4352, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:1015-30. 2008
    ..robustus do not necessarily indicate the habitat preference of the hominins. Rather, it would appear that in addition to being dietary generalists, A. robustus were also likely to have been habitat generalists...
  12. ncbi request reprint Intraspecific variation in hair delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) with known individual histories, behavior, and feeding ecology
    James E Loudon
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 0233, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 133:978-85. 2007
    ..Moreover, lemurs that had emigrated between 2003 and 2004 had different delta(13)C and delta(15)N compositions than their original groups...
  13. ncbi request reprint Tracking changing environments using stable carbon isotopes in fossil tooth enamel: an example from the South African hominin sites
    Julia A Lee-Thorp
    Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Bradford, BD7 1DP, UK
    J Hum Evol 53:595-601. 2007
    ..Mean (13)C/(12)C for large felids also mirrored this trend...
  14. ncbi request reprint Significance of diet type and diet quality for ecological diversity of African ungulates
    Daryl Codron
    Department of Archaeology, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch, RSA
    J Anim Ecol 76:526-37. 2007
    ..We discuss the implications of this study for future approaches to achieve a more cohesive understanding of the evolutionary outcomes of herbivore nutrition...
  15. ncbi request reprint Contributions of biogeochemistry to understanding hominin dietary ecology
    Julia Lee-Thorp
    Archaeological Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD1 7DP, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol . 2006
    ..Nevertheless, we argue that more contextual data from modern ecosystem and experimental studies are needed if we are to fully realize their potential...
  16. ncbi request reprint Inter- and intrahabitat dietary variability of chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) in South African savannas based on fecal delta13C, delta15N, and %N
    Daryl Codron
    Quaternary Research Centre, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa
    Am J Phys Anthropol 129:204-14. 2006
    ..These data suggest that chacma baboons adapt their dietary behavior so as to maximize protein intake, regardless of their environment...
  17. ncbi request reprint The effect of dietary protein quality on nitrogen isotope discrimination in mammals and birds
    Charles T Robbins
    Department of Natural Resource Sciences and School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 4236, USA
    Oecologia 144:534-40. 2005
    ..We caution about the care needed in developing studies to understand variation in discrimination and subsequently applying those discrimination factors to estimate assimilated diets of wild animals...