Jacqueline C Snow

Summary

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Goal-driven selective attention in patients with right hemisphere lesions: how intact is the ipsilesional field?
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Brain 129:168-81. 2006
  2. pmc Bringing the real world into the fMRI scanner: repetition effects for pictures versus real objects
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, N6A 5C2
    Sci Rep 1:130. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Impaired visual sensitivity within the ipsilesional hemifield following parietal lobe damage
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Department of Psychology, The Centre for Brain and Mind, Natural Science Centre 207, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
    Cortex 49:158-71. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Central perceptual load does not reduce ipsilesional flanker interference in parietal extinction
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Department of Psychology, Behavioural and Brain Sciences Centre, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Neuropsychology 22:371-82. 2008
  5. pmc Impaired attentional selection following lesions to human pulvinar: evidence for homology between human and monkey
    Jacqueline C Snow
    School of Psychology, Behavioural Brain Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:4054-9. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Are visual texture-selective areas recruited during haptic texture discrimination?
    Samantha K Podrebarac
    The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada
    Neuroimage 94:129-37. 2014
  7. doi request reprint Gender-selective neural populations: evidence from event-related fMRI repetition suppression
    Samantha K Podrebarac
    The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 226:241-52. 2013
  8. ncbi request reprint Stimulus- and goal-driven biases of selective attention following unilateral brain damage: implications for rehabilitation of spatial neglect and extinction
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 24:233-45. 2006

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Goal-driven selective attention in patients with right hemisphere lesions: how intact is the ipsilesional field?
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Brain 129:168-81. 2006
    ..Attentional selection for ipsilesional stimuli in disorders such as spatial neglect and extinction may not therefore be entirely normal, as previously assumed...
  2. pmc Bringing the real world into the fMRI scanner: repetition effects for pictures versus real objects
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, N6A 5C2
    Sci Rep 1:130. 2011
    ..These preliminary results suggest the need for further research with ecologically valid stimuli in other imaging designs to broaden our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying human vision...
  3. doi request reprint Impaired visual sensitivity within the ipsilesional hemifield following parietal lobe damage
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Department of Psychology, The Centre for Brain and Mind, Natural Science Centre 207, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
    Cortex 49:158-71. 2013
    ..Conversely, healthy matched controls were unaffected by distracters. These results indicate that parietal cortex damage can influence visual perception within both the ipsi- as well as the contralesional field...
  4. doi request reprint Central perceptual load does not reduce ipsilesional flanker interference in parietal extinction
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Department of Psychology, Behavioural and Brain Sciences Centre, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Neuropsychology 22:371-82. 2008
    ..Rather, selectivity is strongly influenced by the strength of representations in brain areas that code salience across the visual field...
  5. pmc Impaired attentional selection following lesions to human pulvinar: evidence for homology between human and monkey
    Jacqueline C Snow
    School of Psychology, Behavioural Brain Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:4054-9. 2009
    ..These observations provide the first evidence that the human pulvinar plays a necessary role in modulating physical saliency in attentional selection, and supports a homology in global pulvinar structure between humans and monkey...
  6. ncbi request reprint Are visual texture-selective areas recruited during haptic texture discrimination?
    Samantha K Podrebarac
    The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada
    Neuroimage 94:129-37. 2014
    ..Although areas of ventromedial temporal cortex are recruited during visual and haptic texture perception, these areas appear to be spatially distinct and modality-specific. ..
  7. doi request reprint Gender-selective neural populations: evidence from event-related fMRI repetition suppression
    Samantha K Podrebarac
    The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 226:241-52. 2013
    ..Our results indicate that in addition to the face-selective FFA, cortical areas that are not traditionally considered to be "face-selective" are involved in the perception of gender-based facial cues...
  8. ncbi request reprint Stimulus- and goal-driven biases of selective attention following unilateral brain damage: implications for rehabilitation of spatial neglect and extinction
    Jacqueline C Snow
    Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 24:233-45. 2006
    ..Examples are drawn from the neuropsychological literature and recent experiments conducted within our own laboratory. The implications of ipsilesional spatial selection deficits for rehabilitation are discussed...