Ian D Simpson

Summary

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Snakebite management in India, the first few hours: a guide for primary care physicians
    Ian D Simpson
    WHO Snakebite Treatment Group, Nayathode
    J Indian Med Assoc 105:324, 326, 328 passim. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Snakes of medical importance in India: is the concept of the "Big 4" still relevant and useful?
    Ian D Simpson
    WHO Snakebite Treatment Group
    Wilderness Environ Med 18:2-9. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Antisnake venom production crisis--who told us it was uneconomic and unsustainable?
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:144-55. 2009
  4. doi request reprint A survey of snakebite management knowledge amongst select physicians in Hong Kong and the implications for snakebite training
    Hin T J Fung
    Emergency Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun, New Territories, Hong Kong, People s Republic of China
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:364-70. 2009
  5. doi request reprint The anti snake venom crisis in Africa: a suggested manufacturers product guide
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:275-82. 2009
  6. doi request reprint The global snakebite crisis--a public health issue misunderstood, not neglected
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:43-56. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Time for an alternative perspective: the eternal problem of supply and quality of anti snake venom in the developing world--"it's the economy, stupid"
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 19:186-94. 2008
  8. doi request reprint The "worldwide shortage" of antisnake venom: is the only right answer "produce more" or is it also "use it smarter?"
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 19:99-107. 2008
  9. doi request reprint A study of the current knowledge base in treating snake bite amongst doctors in the high-risk countries of India and Pakistan: does snake bite treatment training reflect local requirements?
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 102:1108-14. 2008
  10. doi request reprint A preliminary survey of Hong Kong snake shops and the potential snake bite risks for the healthcare system
    Oi Fung Wong
    Tuen Mun Hospital, New Territories, Special Administrative Region Hong Kong, People s Republic of China
    Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 103:931-6. 2009

Collaborators

  • Robert L Norris
  • Roger S M Blaylock
  • C Andrade
  • Ka Keung Lam
  • Oi Fung Wong
  • Hin T J Fung
  • D K Kochar
  • Tommy Shing Kit Lam
  • Kit Sun Tan
  • Paul Crow
  • Gary Ades
  • Tak Lun Que
  • Alessandro Grioni
  • Kenneth Ho Leung Ng
  • Hin Tat Fung
  • Kwok Leung Tsui
  • Kam tong Yip
  • Chak Wah Kam
  • David Christopher Lung
  • Kam Chuen Shek
  • Lam Ka-Keung
  • Lam Shing-Kit-Tommy
  • Chak W Kam
  • Ka K Lam
  • Shing K T Lam
  • Fung Hin-Tat
  • Kam Chak-Wah
  • V P Purohit
  • T D Agrawal
  • M Sabir
  • K C Nayak
  • A Kochar
  • P D Tanwar

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. ncbi request reprint Snakebite management in India, the first few hours: a guide for primary care physicians
    Ian D Simpson
    WHO Snakebite Treatment Group, Nayathode
    J Indian Med Assoc 105:324, 326, 328 passim. 2007
    ..This paper provides guidance for the primary healthcare doctor in identification of medically significant snakes, treatment, referral criteria and equipment necessary to successfully manage snakebite in a primary care environment...
  2. ncbi request reprint Snakes of medical importance in India: is the concept of the "Big 4" still relevant and useful?
    Ian D Simpson
    WHO Snakebite Treatment Group
    Wilderness Environ Med 18:2-9. 2007
    ..It should be replaced by the model introduced in the 1980s by the World Health Organization, which has not received adequate circulation and implementation...
  3. doi request reprint Antisnake venom production crisis--who told us it was uneconomic and unsustainable?
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:144-55. 2009
    ..It is our contention that ASV production can be sustained at affordable prices in the developing world. We recommend that any solution to the ASV shortage must take into account the most cost efficient method(s) of production...
  4. doi request reprint A survey of snakebite management knowledge amongst select physicians in Hong Kong and the implications for snakebite training
    Hin T J Fung
    Emergency Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun, New Territories, Hong Kong, People s Republic of China
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:364-70. 2009
    ..Hong Kong hospitals are equipped according to developed country standards, and knowledge therefore becomes the key factor in successful management...
  5. doi request reprint The anti snake venom crisis in Africa: a suggested manufacturers product guide
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:275-82. 2009
    ....
  6. doi request reprint The global snakebite crisis--a public health issue misunderstood, not neglected
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council
    Wilderness Environ Med 20:43-56. 2009
    ..Further, a lack of implementation of key solutions, such as training doctors in developing countries with relevant protocols, has inevitably led to a lack of improvement in the snakebite arena over the last 30 years...
  7. doi request reprint Time for an alternative perspective: the eternal problem of supply and quality of anti snake venom in the developing world--"it's the economy, stupid"
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 19:186-94. 2008
    ..This paper reviews the economic realities of ASV production and suggests a pragmatic, sustainable approach to the problem of supplying ASV to developing countries...
  8. doi request reprint The "worldwide shortage" of antisnake venom: is the only right answer "produce more" or is it also "use it smarter?"
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Wilderness Environ Med 19:99-107. 2008
    ..Until the high-wastage groups are recognized and resolved with training and local protocols and moved into the low-risk/low-wastage group, the true requirement for ASV worldwide cannot be assessed...
  9. doi request reprint A study of the current knowledge base in treating snake bite amongst doctors in the high-risk countries of India and Pakistan: does snake bite treatment training reflect local requirements?
    Ian D Simpson
    Pakistan Medical Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan
    Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 102:1108-14. 2008
    ..The central conclusion of the paper is that local protocols and training are required to adequately prepare doctors to improve treatment and reduce mortality...
  10. doi request reprint A preliminary survey of Hong Kong snake shops and the potential snake bite risks for the healthcare system
    Oi Fung Wong
    Tuen Mun Hospital, New Territories, Special Administrative Region Hong Kong, People s Republic of China
    Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 103:931-6. 2009
    ..The study identified that non-indigenous species are being imported, capable of delivering a venomous bite, which provide a tangible medical risk as ASV is not available to deal with envenomations...
  11. doi request reprint A cross-sectional survey of snake oral bacterial flora from Hong Kong, SAR, China
    Ka Keung Lam
    Department of Accident and Emergency, Pok Oi Hospital, Au Tau, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, People s Republic of China
    Emerg Med J 28:107-14. 2011
    ..To determine the pattern of oral bacterial flora and their sensitivity to antibiotics in freshly captured native snakes in Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China...
  12. ncbi request reprint Snake antivenom product guidelines in India: "the devil is in the details"
    Ian D Simpson
    Wilderness Environ Med 18:163-8. 2007
    ..It is the intent of this article to point out problems with the current Indian antivenom product guidelines and to encourage these manufacturers to produce new literature to accompany their products based on the best available evidence...
  13. ncbi request reprint Rediscovery of severe saw-scaled viper (Echis sochureki) envenoming in the Thar desert region of Rajasthan, India
    D K Kochar
    S P Medical College Bikaner, Rajasthan, India
    Wilderness Environ Med 18:75-85. 2007
    ..Clinical information is reported on 12 victims bitten by definitively identified E sochureki, and 2 clinical cases are described in greater detail to illustrate the severity of envenoming by this snake...
  14. doi request reprint The Ebbinghaus retention curve: training does not increase the ability to apply pressure immobilisation in simulated snake bite--implications for snake bite first aid in the developing world
    Ian D Simpson
    Tamil Nadu Government Snakebite Taskforce, Chennai, India
    Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 102:451-9. 2008
    ..Neither written instructions nor intense training with feedback adequately prepares individuals to apply PIM with correct pressures under the wrap...