Daniel Schwekendiek

Summary

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Recent growth of children in the two Koreas: a meta-analysis
    Daniel Schwekendiek
    Institute of Cross Cultural Studies, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
    Econ Hum Biol 7:109-12. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Regional variations in living conditions during the North Korean food crisis of the 1990s
    Daniel Schwekendiek
    Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University, South Korea
    Asia Pac J Public Health 22:460-76. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Variations in the birth-season effects on height attainment in the two Koreas
    Daniel Schwekendiek
    Institute of Cross Cultural Studies, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
    Ann Hum Biol 36:421-30. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. doi request reprint Recent growth of children in the two Koreas: a meta-analysis
    Daniel Schwekendiek
    Institute of Cross Cultural Studies, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
    Econ Hum Biol 7:109-12. 2009
    ..and 3 kg (6.6 pounds), and the BMI gap was about 1. North Korean boys and girls escaping to South Korea were also found to be on average about 3-4 cm (1-1.6 in.) shorter and 1 kg (2.2 pounds) lighter than their Southern peers...
  2. doi request reprint Regional variations in living conditions during the North Korean food crisis of the 1990s
    Daniel Schwekendiek
    Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University, South Korea
    Asia Pac J Public Health 22:460-76. 2010
    ..When controlling for further variables, they find that boys and older children suffered more during the crisis, although cohorts born before the onset of the famine were significantly better-off...
  3. doi request reprint Variations in the birth-season effects on height attainment in the two Koreas
    Daniel Schwekendiek
    Institute of Cross Cultural Studies, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
    Ann Hum Biol 36:421-30. 2009
    ..Previous studies have reported a consistent link between birth season and height in northern and southern hemisphere humans, creating a pattern in which spring birth cohorts are the tallest, and autumn birth cohorts are the shortest...