G Reaven

Summary

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The kidney: an unwilling accomplice in syndrome X
    G M Reaven
    Shaman Pharmaceuticals, Inc, South San Francisco, CA 94080 4812, USA
    Am J Kidney Dis 30:928-31. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint Insulin resistance and human disease: a short history
    G M Reaven
    Stanford University School of Medicine, South San Francisco, CA, USA
    J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol 9:387-406. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Insulin resistance: a chicken that has come to roost
    G M Reaven
    Stanford University School of Medicine, California 93405, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 892:45-57. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Effect of orlistat-assisted weight loss in decreasing coronary heart disease risk in patients with syndrome X
    G Reaven
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Am J Cardiol 87:827-31. 2001
  5. doi request reprint Persistence of improvement in insulin sensitivity following a dietary weight loss programme
    T McLaughlin
    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Diabetes Obes Metab 10:1186-94. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue: relationship to adipose cell size
    T McLaughlin
    Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Rm S025, Stanford, CA 94305 5103, USA
    Diabetologia 53:369-77. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Metabolic abnormalities characteristic of dysmetabolic syndrome predict the development of transplant coronary artery disease: a prospective study
    H Valantine
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Circulation 103:2144-52. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Relationship between insulin resistance, weight loss, and coronary heart disease risk in healthy, obese women
    T McLaughlin
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA, USA
    Metabolism 50:795-800. 2001
  9. pmc Insulin resistance is associated with a modest increase in inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue of moderately obese women
    T McLaughlin
    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5103, USA
    Diabetologia 51:2303-8. 2008

Collaborators

  • F Abbasi
  • H S Kim
  • J Hauptman
  • T McLaughlin
  • C Lamendola
  • A Sherman
  • P S Tsao
  • A Deng
  • S W Cushman
  • G Yee
  • H Valantine
  • P Schweitzer
  • C G Yen
  • O Gonzales
  • S Carter
  • A J Connolly
  • M Aillaud
  • E B Stinson
  • P Rickenbacker
  • S Hunt
  • P Schaaf
  • M Kemna
  • Y D Chen

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint The kidney: an unwilling accomplice in syndrome X
    G M Reaven
    Shaman Pharmaceuticals, Inc, South San Francisco, CA 94080 4812, USA
    Am J Kidney Dis 30:928-31. 1997
    ..As such, it is possible that a normal kidney response to the compensatory hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance in nondiabetic subjects contributes to the development of hyperuricemia and hypertension in such individuals...
  2. ncbi request reprint Insulin resistance and human disease: a short history
    G M Reaven
    Stanford University School of Medicine, South San Francisco, CA, USA
    J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol 9:387-406. 1998
    ..In this review an effort has been made to trace a brief history of insulin resistance from its inception to its current position as the fundamental abnormality in both type 2 diabetes and Syndrome X...
  3. ncbi request reprint Insulin resistance: a chicken that has come to roost
    G M Reaven
    Stanford University School of Medicine, California 93405, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 892:45-57. 1999
    ..I resistance is a physiological characteristic, genetically determined, that helped primitive humans to survive. It is greatly aggravated by obesity and physical inactivity, and represents a modern scourge...
  4. ncbi request reprint Effect of orlistat-assisted weight loss in decreasing coronary heart disease risk in patients with syndrome X
    G Reaven
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Am J Cardiol 87:827-31. 2001
    ..In conclusion, weight loss attenuates coronary heart disease risk factors in obese persons with syndrome X, and the risk factor reduction is enhanced with administration of orlistat...
  5. doi request reprint Persistence of improvement in insulin sensitivity following a dietary weight loss programme
    T McLaughlin
    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Diabetes Obes Metab 10:1186-94. 2008
    ..We sought to quantify the degree to which maintenance of weight loss after a short-term dietary intervention was associated with persistent metabolic benefits...
  6. doi request reprint Inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue: relationship to adipose cell size
    T McLaughlin
    Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Rm S025, Stanford, CA 94305 5103, USA
    Diabetologia 53:369-77. 2010
    ..We sought to determine whether increased size of adipose cells is associated with localised inflammation in weight-stable, moderately obese humans...
  7. ncbi request reprint Metabolic abnormalities characteristic of dysmetabolic syndrome predict the development of transplant coronary artery disease: a prospective study
    H Valantine
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Circulation 103:2144-52. 2001
    ..3 mm than with IT </=0.3 mm. TxCAD incidence was higher in patients with high plasma TG and VLDL and low HDL. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that insulin resistance plays a role in TXCAD:..
  8. ncbi request reprint Relationship between insulin resistance, weight loss, and coronary heart disease risk in healthy, obese women
    T McLaughlin
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA, USA
    Metabolism 50:795-800. 2001
    ..Given these data, it seems obvious that attempts to reduce CHD risk factors by weight loss should focus on obese individuals who are also insulin-resistant...
  9. pmc Insulin resistance is associated with a modest increase in inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue of moderately obese women
    T McLaughlin
    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5103, USA
    Diabetologia 51:2303-8. 2008
    ..To determine whether other biological properties also differ between IR and IS obese individuals, we quantified markers of inflammatory activity in adipose tissue from overweight IR and IS individuals...