May Britt Drugli

Summary

Affiliation: Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Country: Norway

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Children aged 4-8 years treated with parent training and child therapy because of conduct problems: generalisation effects to day-care and school settings
    May Britt Drugli
    Section of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Dept of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7489 Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 15:392-9. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Changes in social competence in young children treated because of conduct problems as viewed by multiple informants
    May Britt Drugli
    Section of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7489 Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 16:370-8. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Characteristics of young children with persistent conduct problems 1 year after treatment with the Incredible Years program
    May Britt Drugli
    Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 7489, Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 19:559-65. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Five- to six-year outcome and its prediction for children with ODD/CD treated with parent training
    May Britt Drugli
    Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 51:559-66. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Treatment of oppositional defiant and conduct problems in young Norwegian children : results of a randomized controlled trial
    Bo Larsson
    Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, N 7489, Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 18:42-52. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Symptom changes of oppositional defiant disorder after treatment with the Incredible Years Program
    Sara Hobbel
    Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Nord J Psychiatry 67:97-103. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Associations between high levels of conduct problems and co-occurring problems among the youngest boys and girls in schools: a cross-sectional study
    Bente Kirkhaug
    Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Institute of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway
    Nord J Psychiatry 67:225-32. 2013
  8. ncbi request reprint Childhood disruptive behaviors and family functioning in clinically referred children: are girls different from boys?
    Sturla Fossum
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway
    Scand J Psychol 48:375-82. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Children aged 4-8 years treated with parent training and child therapy because of conduct problems: generalisation effects to day-care and school settings
    May Britt Drugli
    Section of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Dept of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7489 Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 15:392-9. 2006
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Changes in social competence in young children treated because of conduct problems as viewed by multiple informants
    May Britt Drugli
    Section of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7489 Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 16:370-8. 2007
    ..A broad perspective using multiple informants from different settings is needed when effects of treatment of young children with conduct problems are evaluated and should include various aspects of social competence...
  3. doi request reprint Characteristics of young children with persistent conduct problems 1 year after treatment with the Incredible Years program
    May Britt Drugli
    Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 7489, Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 19:559-65. 2010
    ..Clinicians and researchers need to closely monitor and identify children with conduct problems not responding to parent training programs. These individuals and their families are likely to need further support...
  4. doi request reprint Five- to six-year outcome and its prediction for children with ODD/CD treated with parent training
    May Britt Drugli
    Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 51:559-66. 2010
    ..While short-term effects of parent training (PT) have been extensively evaluated, long-term outcome and present predictors of a diagnosis for children with ODD/CD treated with parent training are very limited...
  5. doi request reprint Treatment of oppositional defiant and conduct problems in young Norwegian children : results of a randomized controlled trial
    Bo Larsson
    Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, N 7489, Trondheim, Norway
    Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 18:42-52. 2009
    ..The findings and usefulness of the Incredible Years program in the present Norwegian replication study further support and extend positive outcomes of previous controlled trials conducted primarily in Anglo-Saxon countries...
  6. doi request reprint Symptom changes of oppositional defiant disorder after treatment with the Incredible Years Program
    Sara Hobbel
    Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Nord J Psychiatry 67:97-103. 2013
    ..To examine changes in symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) after treatment with the Incredible Years Program. The frequency of symptoms was also calculated...
  7. doi request reprint Associations between high levels of conduct problems and co-occurring problems among the youngest boys and girls in schools: a cross-sectional study
    Bente Kirkhaug
    Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Institute of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway
    Nord J Psychiatry 67:225-32. 2013
    ..In particular, there is a lack of studies that differentiate between boys and girls in terms of such problems...
  8. ncbi request reprint Childhood disruptive behaviors and family functioning in clinically referred children: are girls different from boys?
    Sturla Fossum
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway
    Scand J Psychol 48:375-82. 2007
    ..Nevertheless, the level of stress was higher in girls' than in boys' families, and mothers of girls reported of higher levels of depressive symptoms. Girls and boys did not differ regarding diagnostic status...