Barnaby J Dixson

Summary

Affiliation: Victoria University of Wellington
Country: New Zealand

Publications

  1. doi Human physique and sexual attractiveness in men and women: a New Zealand-U.S. comparative study
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 39:798-806. 2010
  2. doi Eye-tracking of men's preferences for waist-to-hip ratio and breast size of women
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 40:43-50. 2011
  3. doi Male preferences for female waist-to-hip ratio and body mass index in the highlands of Papua New Guinea
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:620-5. 2010
  4. doi Eye tracking of men's preferences for female breast size and areola pigmentation
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 40:51-8. 2011
  5. doi Men's preferences for women's breast morphology in New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 40:1271-9. 2011
  6. pmc Whatever the weather: ambient temperature does not influence the proportion of males born in New Zealand
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 6:e25064. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. doi Human physique and sexual attractiveness in men and women: a New Zealand-U.S. comparative study
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 39:798-806. 2010
    ..Results indicate very similar preferences for sexually dimorphic physical traits among men and women of European extraction, living in two culturally and geographically different environments...
  2. doi Eye-tracking of men's preferences for waist-to-hip ratio and breast size of women
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 40:43-50. 2011
    ..These results provide quantitative data on eye movements that occur during male judgments of the attractiveness of female images, and indicate that assessments of the female hourglass figure probably occur very rapidly...
  3. doi Male preferences for female waist-to-hip ratio and body mass index in the highlands of Papua New Guinea
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:620-5. 2010
    ..These results show that the hourglass female figure is rated as attractive by men living in a remote, indigenous community, and that when controlling for BMI, WHR plays a crucial role in their attractiveness judgments...
  4. doi Eye tracking of men's preferences for female breast size and areola pigmentation
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 40:51-8. 2011
    ..However, fine-grained measures of men's visual attention to these morphological traits do not correlate, in a simplistic way, with their attractiveness judgments...
  5. doi Men's preferences for women's breast morphology in New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Arch Sex Behav 40:1271-9. 2011
    ..This study highlights the importance of cross-cultural research when testing the role of morphological cues in mate choice...
  6. pmc Whatever the weather: ambient temperature does not influence the proportion of males born in New Zealand
    Barnaby J Dixson
    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 6:e25064. 2011
    ..Given that fluctuations in ambient temperature have previously been shown to affect sex allocation in humans, we examined the hypothesis that ambient temperature predicts fluctuations in the proportion of male births in New Zealand...