Jason M Tylianakis

Summary

Affiliation: University of Canterbury
Country: New Zealand

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Habitat modification alters the structure of tropical host-parasitoid food webs
    Jason M Tylianakis
    Agroecology, Georg August University, Waldweg 26, Goettingen D 37073, Germany
    Nature 445:202-5. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of habitat modification and species invasion on native species decline
    Raphael K Didham
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:489-96. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Global change and species interactions in terrestrial ecosystems
    Jason M Tylianakis
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Ecol Lett 11:1351-63. 2008
  4. pmc Understanding the web of life: the birds, the bees, and sex with aliens
    Jason M Tylianakis
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    PLoS Biol 6:e47. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Diversity, ecosystem function, and stability of parasitoid-host interactions across a tropical habitat gradient
    Jason M Tylianakis
    Agroecology, Georg August University, Waldweg 26, Göttingen D 37073, Germany
    Ecology 87:3047-57. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Caveats to quantifying ecosystem services: fruit abortion blurs benefits from crop pollination
    Merijn M Bos
    Agroecology, University of Goettingen, Waldweg 26, Goettingen D 37073, Germany
    Ecol Appl 17:1841-9. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Landscape moderation of biodiversity patterns and processes - eight hypotheses
    Teja Tscharntke
    Agroecology, Department of Crop Sciences, Georg August University, Grisebachstrasse 6, 37077 Gottingen, Germany
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:661-85. 2012
  8. ncbi request reprint Plant-mediated and nonadditive effects of two global change drivers on an insect herbivore community
    Claudio de Sassi
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041 New Zealand
    Ecology 93:1892-901. 2012
  9. pmc Warming and nitrogen affect size structuring and density dependence in a host-parasitoid food web
    Claudio de Sassi
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:3033-41. 2012
  10. ncbi request reprint Landscape constraints on functional diversity of birds and insects in tropical agroecosystems
    Teja Tscharntke
    Agroecology, University of Gottingen, Georg August Universitat, Waldweg 26, D 37073 Gottingen, Germany
    Ecology 89:944-51. 2008

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. ncbi request reprint Habitat modification alters the structure of tropical host-parasitoid food webs
    Jason M Tylianakis
    Agroecology, Georg August University, Waldweg 26, Goettingen D 37073, Germany
    Nature 445:202-5. 2007
    ..Altered interaction structure therefore represents an insidious and functionally important hidden effect of habitat modification by humans...
  2. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of habitat modification and species invasion on native species decline
    Raphael K Didham
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:489-96. 2007
    ..Our framework is a first step toward building a better quantitative understanding of how interactions between drivers might mitigate or exacerbate the net effects of global environmental change on biotic communities in the future...
  3. ncbi request reprint Global change and species interactions in terrestrial ecosystems
    Jason M Tylianakis
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Ecol Lett 11:1351-63. 2008
    ....
  4. pmc Understanding the web of life: the birds, the bees, and sex with aliens
    Jason M Tylianakis
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    PLoS Biol 6:e47. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Diversity, ecosystem function, and stability of parasitoid-host interactions across a tropical habitat gradient
    Jason M Tylianakis
    Agroecology, Georg August University, Waldweg 26, Göttingen D 37073, Germany
    Ecology 87:3047-57. 2006
    ..We also show that pooling data over long time periods, as in previous studies, can blur the effect of diversity on parasitism rates, and the appropriate spatiotemporal scale of study must be considered...
  6. ncbi request reprint Caveats to quantifying ecosystem services: fruit abortion blurs benefits from crop pollination
    Merijn M Bos
    Agroecology, University of Goettingen, Waldweg 26, Goettingen D 37073, Germany
    Ecol Appl 17:1841-9. 2007
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Landscape moderation of biodiversity patterns and processes - eight hypotheses
    Teja Tscharntke
    Agroecology, Department of Crop Sciences, Georg August University, Grisebachstrasse 6, 37077 Gottingen, Germany
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:661-85. 2012
    ..Shifting our research focus from local to landscape-moderated effects on biodiversity will be critical to developing solutions for future biodiversity and ecosystem service management...
  8. ncbi request reprint Plant-mediated and nonadditive effects of two global change drivers on an insect herbivore community
    Claudio de Sassi
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041 New Zealand
    Ecology 93:1892-901. 2012
    ....
  9. pmc Warming and nitrogen affect size structuring and density dependence in a host-parasitoid food web
    Claudio de Sassi
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:3033-41. 2012
    ..e. larger) hosts. In summary, we present evidence that climate-mediated bottom-up effects can significantly alter food-web structure through both density- and trait-mediated effects...
  10. ncbi request reprint Landscape constraints on functional diversity of birds and insects in tropical agroecosystems
    Teja Tscharntke
    Agroecology, University of Gottingen, Georg August Universitat, Waldweg 26, D 37073 Gottingen, Germany
    Ecology 89:944-51. 2008
    ..This is important for data-based management of tropical human-dominated landscapes sustaining the capacity of communities to reorganize after disturbance and to ensure ecological functioning...
  11. ncbi request reprint Deforestation homogenizes tropical parasitoid-host networks
    Etienne Laliberté
    School of Forestry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Ecology 91:1740-7. 2010
    ....
  12. pmc Functional group diversity of bee pollinators increases crop yield
    Patrick Hoehn
    Agroecology, University of Gottingen, Waldweg 26, 37073 Gottingen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2283-91. 2008
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Warming, CO2, and nitrogen deposition interactively affect a plant-pollinator mutualism
    Shelley E R Hoover
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Ecol Lett 15:227-34. 2012
    ..Thus, three of the five major drivers of global environmental change have previously unknown interactive effects on plant-pollinator mutualisms that could not be predicted from studies of individual drivers in isolation...
  14. ncbi request reprint Cascading effects of long-term land-use changes on plant traits and ecosystem functioning
    Etienne Laliberté
    School of Forestry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8013, New Zealand
    Ecology 93:145-55. 2012
    ..Our study reveals how human alterations of bottom-up (resources) and top-down (herbivory) forces together interact to control the functioning of grazing systems, the most extensive land use on Earth...
  15. pmc Climate change disproportionately increases herbivore over plant or parasitoid biomass
    Claudio de Sassi
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 7:e40557. 2012
    ..Our findings also provide multitrophic data to support the general concern of increasing herbivore pest outbreaks in a warmer world...
  16. pmc Translocation of threatened New Zealand falcons to vineyards increases nest attendance, brooding and feeding rates
    Sara M Kross
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 7:e38679. 2012
    ..Although agricultural regions globally are rarely associated with raptor conservation, these results suggest that translocating New Zealand falcons into vineyards has potential for the conservation of this species...
  17. doi request reprint Effects of introducing threatened falcons into vineyards on abundance of passeriformes and bird damage to grapes
    Sara M Kross
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conserv Biol 26:142-9. 2012
    ..Our results indicate that, relative to damage in vineyards without falcons, the presence of a falcon could potentially result in savings of US$234/ha for the Sauvignon Blanc variety of grapes and $326/ha for Pinot Noir variety of grapes...
  18. doi request reprint Genetic analyses reveal hybridization but no hybrid swarm in one of the world's rarest birds
    Tammy E Steeves
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Mol Ecol 19:5090-100. 2010
    ..To maximize the evolutionary potential of kakī, we use these data to recommend conservation management activities aimed to maintain the genetic integrity and to maximize the genetic diversity of this iconic rare bird...
  19. ncbi request reprint Spillover edge effects: the dispersal of agriculturally subsidized insect natural enemies into adjacent natural habitats
    Tatyana A Rand
    Agroecology, University of Gottingen, Waldweg 26, 37073 Gottingen, Germany
    Ecol Lett 9:603-14. 2006
    ..More empirical work examining the prevalence and significance of such natural enemy spillover will be critical to a broader understanding of fragmentation impacts on insect predator-prey interactions...
  20. ncbi request reprint Field boundaries as barriers to movement of hover flies (Diptera: Syrphidae) in cultivated land
    Steve D Wratten
    Ecology and Entomology Group, Division of Soi, Plant and Ecological Sciences l, P O Box 84, Lincoln University, New Zealand
    Oecologia 134:605-11. 2003
    ..If field boundaries contribute to a temporal asynchrony between pest and natural enemy populations, this needs to be considered along with the well-established roles of boundaries as refugia for, and sources of, beneficial arthropods...