William S Helton

Summary

Affiliation: University of Canterbury
Country: New Zealand

Publications

  1. doi Physical size matters in the domestic dog's (Canis lupus familiaris) ability to use human pointing cues
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
    Behav Processes 85:77-9. 2010
  2. doi Natural disaster induced cognitive disruption: impacts on action slips
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 20:1732-7. 2011
  3. doi Visuospatial and verbal working memory load: effects on visuospatial vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 224:429-36. 2013
  4. ncbi Earthquakes on the mind: implications of disasters for human performance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Hum Factors 54:189-94. 2012
  5. doi Brief mental breaks and content-free cues may not keep you focused
    William S Helton
    University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 219:37-46. 2012
  6. doi Working memory load and the vigilance decrement
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 212:429-37. 2011
  7. doi Reliable- and unreliable-warning cues in the Sustained Attention to Response Task
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 209:401-7. 2011
  8. doi Feature absence-presence and two theories of lapses of sustained attention
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Psychol Res 75:384-92. 2011
  9. doi Performance constraints in strength events in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris)
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
    Behav Processes 86:149-51. 2011
  10. ncbi The effects of arousing negative and neutral picture stimuli on target detection in a vigilance task
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Hum Factors 53:132-41. 2011

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. doi Physical size matters in the domestic dog's (Canis lupus familiaris) ability to use human pointing cues
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
    Behav Processes 85:77-9. 2010
    ..Larger dogs did perform better on this task than smaller dogs (P=.03). Researchers need to be careful when making comparisons between breeds to first consider physical differences before assuming any inherent cognitive differences...
  2. doi Natural disaster induced cognitive disruption: impacts on action slips
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 20:1732-7. 2011
    ..Post-disaster assessments need to include the impact of the events directly on cognitive self-regulation and conscious thoughts, in addition to more clinical constructs, such as anxiety and depression...
  3. doi Visuospatial and verbal working memory load: effects on visuospatial vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 224:429-36. 2013
    ..There may, however, be domain specific interference, and this may be exacerbated for two visuospatial tasks...
  4. ncbi Earthquakes on the mind: implications of disasters for human performance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Hum Factors 54:189-94. 2012
    ..The present study explored the impact a natural disaster has on human performance...
  5. doi Brief mental breaks and content-free cues may not keep you focused
    William S Helton
    University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 219:37-46. 2012
    ....
  6. doi Working memory load and the vigilance decrement
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 212:429-37. 2011
    ..Overall, these results support the view that the vigilance decrement results from high cognitive resource demands (e.g., hard work), not from cognitive under-load (e.g., boredom or mindlessness)...
  7. doi Reliable- and unreliable-warning cues in the Sustained Attention to Response Task
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 209:401-7. 2011
    ..These results, overall, support the view that the SART is primarily a measure of response strategy, not sustained attention per se...
  8. doi Feature absence-presence and two theories of lapses of sustained attention
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Psychol Res 75:384-92. 2011
    ..The decrement was more pronounced with the targets more analogous to a feature absent search. Overall, the results of both studies support a resource theory of sustained attention lapses, not the mindlessness theory...
  9. doi Performance constraints in strength events in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris)
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
    Behav Processes 86:149-51. 2011
    ..Morphological trade-offs between power and running ability may be an important constraint on the evolution of canines and other terrestrial vertebrates...
  10. ncbi The effects of arousing negative and neutral picture stimuli on target detection in a vigilance task
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Hum Factors 53:132-41. 2011
    ....
  11. doi Post-disaster depression and vigilance: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 226:357-62. 2013
    ..Including the case there was a correlation between depressivity and right hemisphere oxygenation. These results provide some support for a relationship between moderate depressivity and sustained attention difficulties...
  12. doi Text-speak processing and the sustained attention to response task
    James Head
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 216:103-11. 2012
    ....
  13. doi Does perceived trainability of dog (Canis lupus familiaris) breeds reflect differences in learning or differences in physical ability?
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand Deak
    Behav Processes 83:315-23. 2010
    ..Overall, the results of these studies are more supportive of a physical capability interpretation of perceived breed differences in trainability, than a more cognitive interpretation...
  14. doi Search asymmetry, sustained attention, and response inhibition
    Hugh Stevenson
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Brain Cogn 77:215-22. 2011
    ..Overall, the results suggest the SART places high response inhibition, not necessarily sustained attention, demands on participants...
  15. doi Target predictability, sustained attention, and response inhibition
    Leonie Carter
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Brain Cogn 82:35-42. 2013
    ..Elevated levels of task-related thoughts during the SART format condition in comparison to the TFT condition does not appear to be in accord with the claim that the SART induces mindlessness...
  16. doi Increased attentiveness is associated with hemispheric asymmetry measured with lateral tympanic membrane temperature in humans and dogs
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 219:321-6. 2012
    ..There was no discernable relationship between hyperactivity and lateralized T(Ty). Differences in T(Ty) may be an useful tool for investigating species comparisons of cerebral lateralization...
  17. doi Global interference and spatial uncertainty in the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART)
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 19:77-85. 2010
    ..The results, overall, support the view that the SART is a better measure of response strategy than lapses in sustained attention or mindlessness...
  18. doi The effects of emotional stimuli on target detection: indirect and direct resource costs
    Ulrike Ossowski
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 20:1649-58. 2011
    ..These results provide support for indirect cost models of negative emotional stimuli on target detection performance...
  19. doi Cerebral lateralization of vigilance: a function of task difficulty
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Neuropsychologia 48:1683-8. 2010
    ..Unilateral hemispheric activation in vigilance may be a result of employing relatively easy/simple tasks, not vigilance per se...
  20. doi Natural scene stimuli and lapses of sustained attention
    James Head
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 21:1617-25. 2012
    ..Participants thought the task was demanding and they were actively engaged with the task. Overall, the results of both studies support a resource theory of sustained attention lapses, not a mindlessness theory...
  21. ncbi Novel word processing
    James Head
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand
    Am J Psychol 126:323-33. 2013
    ....
  22. doi Conscious thought and the sustained attention to response task
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 18:600-7. 2009
    ..Overall, the results support the view that the SART is a better measure of impulsive responding than sustained attention...
  23. doi Dual-task performance during a climbing traverse
    Alexander L Green
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 215:307-13. 2011
    ..These results could be expanded on in future research to examine the physical and cognitive demands of high-angle climbing in greater detail...
  24. doi Dissociative tendencies and right-hemisphere processing load: effects on vigilance performance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 20:696-702. 2011
    ..As both the vigilance task and negative picture processing are right lateralized, this result provides support for a right-hemisphere dysfunction in high dissociators, at least in negative conditions...
  25. doi The relationship between lateral differences in tympanic membrane temperature and behavioral impulsivity
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Brain Cogn 74:75-8. 2010
    ..This finding is in line with previous research and theory indicating a hemispheric bias for active and passive behavior. T(Ty) may be a useful addition to the techniques employed by neuropsychologists...
  26. doi A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study of sustained attention to local and global target features
    Neil De Joux
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Brain Cogn 81:370-5. 2013
    ..Both the performance and physiological results of this study indicate increased utilization of bilateral cerebral resources with time-on-task in the local, but not the global discrimination vigil...
  27. doi Stress state mediation between environmental variables and performance: the case of noise and vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 130:204-13. 2009
    ..Moreover, structural equation model analyses were used to examine stress state mediation between the experimental variables and performance. These analyses indicated Engagement mediates between noise and vigilance performance...
  28. doi The effect of investigator gender on lateral tympanic membrane temperature
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Laterality 16:156-63. 2011
    ..When measured by a male investigator, both male and female participants had similar right and left TMT. These lateral TMT results correspond with neuropsychological theories regarding threat appraisal...
  29. doi Cephalic index and perceived dog trainability
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
    Behav Processes 82:355-8. 2009
    ..Dog breeds rated as highly trainable are instead mesocephalic, morphological generalists. Looking trainable in dogs may reflect differences in physical morphology...
  30. doi Exceptional running skill in dogs requires extensive experience
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    J Gen Psychol 136:323-32. 2009
    ..The author discusses the benefit of future research on motor-skill acquisition in nonhuman athletes...
  31. doi Practice does not make perfect in a modified sustained attention to response task
    James Head
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 232:565-73. 2014
    ..Commission errors in the SART may be better measures of executive motor control and response strategy than perceptual decoupling. ..
  32. doi Perceptual decoupling or motor decoupling?
    James Head
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
    Conscious Cogn 22:913-9. 2013
    ..The results suggest that the majority of SART commission errors are likely to be indicators of motor decoupling not necessarily perceptual decoupling. ..
  33. doi Frontal cerebral oxygen response as an indicator of initial attention effort during perceptual learning
    Michael Ong
    Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Exp Brain Res 229:571-8. 2013
    ..The initial spike in frontal oxygen response declined with time on task, perhaps due to shifts towards automaticity. The results suggest perceptual learning is influenced by individual differences in attention effort...