Matthew R Goddard

Summary

Affiliation: University of Auckland
Country: New Zealand

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Sex increases the efficacy of natural selection in experimental yeast populations
    Matthew R Goddard
    NERC Centre for Population Biology and Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot SL5 7PY, UK
    Nature 434:636-40. 2005
  2. pmc Invasion and persistence of a selfish gene in the Cnidaria
    Matthew R Goddard
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand National Environment Research Council Centre for Population Biology, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 1:e3. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Quantifying the complexities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae's ecosystem engineering via fermentation
    Matthew R Goddard
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    Ecology 89:2077-82. 2008
  4. doi request reprint A distinct population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in New Zealand: evidence for local dispersal by insects and human-aided global dispersal in oak barrels
    Matthew R Goddard
    The School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    Environ Microbiol 12:63-73. 2010
  5. pmc Quantifying variation in the ability of yeasts to attract Drosophila melanogaster
    Loida Palanca
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 8:e75332. 2013
  6. pmc Population genetics of the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus
    Louise J Johnson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College at Silwood Park, Ascot SL5 7PY, United Kingdom
    Genetics 166:43-52. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Adaptation for horizontal transfer in a homing endonuclease
    Vassiliki Koufopanou
    Department of Biology, Imperial College, Silwood Park, Ascot, Berkshire, UK
    Mol Biol Evol 19:239-46. 2002
  8. doi request reprint A database of microsatellite genotypes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Keith D Richards
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 96:355-9. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Saccharomyces paradoxus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae reside on oak trees in New Zealand: evidence for migration from Europe and interspecies hybrids
    Hanyao Zhang
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    FEMS Yeast Res 10:941-7. 2010
  10. pmc A parasitic selfish gene that affects host promiscuity
    Paulina Giraldo-Perez
    The School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92109, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, New Zealand
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20131875. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi request reprint Sex increases the efficacy of natural selection in experimental yeast populations
    Matthew R Goddard
    NERC Centre for Population Biology and Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot SL5 7PY, UK
    Nature 434:636-40. 2005
    ..We show that, as predicted by the theory, sex increases the rate of adaptation to a new harsh environment but has no measurable effect on fitness in a new benign environment where there is little selection...
  2. pmc Invasion and persistence of a selfish gene in the Cnidaria
    Matthew R Goddard
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand National Environment Research Council Centre for Population Biology, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 1:e3. 2006
    ..Although HEGs are found in a variety of microbes, we found the previous discovery of this type of selfish genetic element in the mitochondria of a sea anemone surprising...
  3. ncbi request reprint Quantifying the complexities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae's ecosystem engineering via fermentation
    Matthew R Goddard
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    Ecology 89:2077-82. 2008
    ..cerevisiae, and other organisms that access the fruit resource, including humans, are exposed to...
  4. doi request reprint A distinct population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in New Zealand: evidence for local dispersal by insects and human-aided global dispersal in oak barrels
    Matthew R Goddard
    The School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    Environ Microbiol 12:63-73. 2010
    ..It seems some strains have been globally dispersed by humans in oak barrels while some are locally vectored by insects. These data suggest geography is more important than ecology in shaping S. cerevisiae's population structure...
  5. pmc Quantifying variation in the ability of yeasts to attract Drosophila melanogaster
    Loida Palanca
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 8:e75332. 2013
    ....
  6. pmc Population genetics of the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus
    Louise J Johnson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College at Silwood Park, Ascot SL5 7PY, United Kingdom
    Genetics 166:43-52. 2004
    ..1% on the basis of heterozygosity. Thus, all three modes of reproduction known in the lab (clonal replication, inbreeding, and outcrossing) have been important in molding genetic variation in this species...
  7. ncbi request reprint Adaptation for horizontal transfer in a homing endonuclease
    Vassiliki Koufopanou
    Department of Biology, Imperial College, Silwood Park, Ascot, Berkshire, UK
    Mol Biol Evol 19:239-46. 2002
    ..The frequency of horizontal transmission must therefore be a key feature constraining the distribution and abundance of these genes...
  8. doi request reprint A database of microsatellite genotypes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Keith D Richards
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 96:355-9. 2009
    ..The genotyping system provides a rapid and valuable system for strain identification as well as studying population genetics of S. cerevisiae...
  9. doi request reprint Saccharomyces paradoxus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae reside on oak trees in New Zealand: evidence for migration from Europe and interspecies hybrids
    Hanyao Zhang
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    FEMS Yeast Res 10:941-7. 2010
    ..We show that S. paradoxus is associated with acorns and thus provide a potential mechanism for the unwitting global dispersal of S. paradoxus by humans...
  10. pmc A parasitic selfish gene that affects host promiscuity
    Paulina Giraldo-Perez
    The School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92109, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, New Zealand
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20131875. 2013
    ..Demonstration that selfish genes are correlated with increased promiscuity in eukaryotes connects with ideas suggesting that selfish genes promoted the evolution of sex initially. ..
  11. pmc Geographic delineations of yeast communities and populations associated with vines and wines in New Zealand
    Velimir Gayevskiy
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, New Zealand
    ISME J 6:1281-90. 2012
    ..We believe this is the first demonstration of regional delineations of yeast populations and communities worldwide...
  12. doi request reprint Optimized fermentation of grape juice by laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Michael J Harsch
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    FEMS Yeast Res 10:72-82. 2010
    ..Fermentation in media based on grape juice will allow the suite of molecular genetic tools developed for these laboratory strains to be used in investigations of complex ferment characteristics and products...
  13. doi request reprint Gene-flow between niches facilitates local adaptation in sexual populations
    Jeremy C Gray
    The School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand
    Ecol Lett 15:955-62. 2012
    ..This experiment shows that sex may be of benefit in heterogeneous environments, and thus helps explain why sex has been maintained more generally...
  14. pmc Sex enhances adaptation by unlinking beneficial from detrimental mutations in experimental yeast populations
    Jeremy C Gray
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
    BMC Evol Biol 12:43. 2012
    ....
  15. pmc ObStruct: a method to objectively analyse factors driving population structure using Bayesian ancestry profiles
    Velimir Gayevskiy
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 9:e85196. 2014
    ....