Raphael K Didham

Summary

Affiliation: University of Canterbury
Country: New Zealand

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Avian extinction and mammalian introductions on oceanic islands"
    Raphael K Didham
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Science 307:1412; author reply 1412. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of habitat modification and species invasion on native species decline
    Raphael K Didham
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:489-96. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint The effect of fragment shape and species' sensitivity to habitat edges on animal population size
    Robert M Ewers
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conserv Biol 21:926-36. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Synergistic interactions between edge and area effects in a heavily fragmented landscape
    Robert M Ewers
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Ecology 88:96-106. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation
    Robert M Ewers
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 81:117-42. 2006
  6. doi request reprint Disentangling the mechanistic drivers of ecosystem-size effects on species diversity
    Tanya J Blakely
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    J Anim Ecol 79:1204-14. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Global change and species interactions in terrestrial ecosystems
    Jason M Tylianakis
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Ecol Lett 11:1351-63. 2008
  8. doi request reprint High-resolution DNA melt-curve analysis for cost-effective mass screening of pairwise species interactions
    James K McCarthy
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Mol Ecol Resour 13:908-17. 2013
  9. pmc An experimental test of insect-mediated colonisation of damaged Pinus radiata trees by sapstain fungi
    James K McCarthy
    Scion New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 8:e55692. 2013
  10. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Why are there so many species of herbivorous insects in tropical rainforests?"
    David A Norton
    School of Forestry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Science 315:1666; author reply 1666. 2007

Detail Information

Publications16

  1. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Avian extinction and mammalian introductions on oceanic islands"
    Raphael K Didham
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Science 307:1412; author reply 1412. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of habitat modification and species invasion on native species decline
    Raphael K Didham
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:489-96. 2007
    ..Our framework is a first step toward building a better quantitative understanding of how interactions between drivers might mitigate or exacerbate the net effects of global environmental change on biotic communities in the future...
  3. ncbi request reprint The effect of fragment shape and species' sensitivity to habitat edges on animal population size
    Robert M Ewers
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Conserv Biol 21:926-36. 2007
    ..Fragment shape played a strong role in determining population size in fragmented landscapes; thus, habitat restoration efforts may be more effective if they focus on connecting disjunct cores rather than isolated fragments...
  4. ncbi request reprint Synergistic interactions between edge and area effects in a heavily fragmented landscape
    Robert M Ewers
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Ecology 88:96-106. 2007
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation
    Robert M Ewers
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 81:117-42. 2006
    ..To conclude, we emphasise that anthropogenic fragmentation is a recent phenomenon in evolutionary time and suggest that the final, long-term impacts of habitat fragmentation may not yet have shown themselves...
  6. doi request reprint Disentangling the mechanistic drivers of ecosystem-size effects on species diversity
    Tanya J Blakely
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    J Anim Ecol 79:1204-14. 2010
    ..5. Our results imply that the universally accepted relationship between ecosystem size and biodiversity can be reversed by nutrient enrichment, an increasingly observed human-induced driver of global environmental change...
  7. ncbi request reprint Global change and species interactions in terrestrial ecosystems
    Jason M Tylianakis
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Ecol Lett 11:1351-63. 2008
    ....
  8. doi request reprint High-resolution DNA melt-curve analysis for cost-effective mass screening of pairwise species interactions
    James K McCarthy
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
    Mol Ecol Resour 13:908-17. 2013
    ..It is anticipated that this method can be readily applied to explore other cryptic species interactions, or other studies requiring rapid generation of large data sets and/or high-throughput efficiency. ..
  9. pmc An experimental test of insect-mediated colonisation of damaged Pinus radiata trees by sapstain fungi
    James K McCarthy
    Scion New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 8:e55692. 2013
    ..We discuss the implications of these findings for forest management and the effective salvage-harvest of trees damaged by stochastic climate events such as storm and fire damage...
  10. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Why are there so many species of herbivorous insects in tropical rainforests?"
    David A Norton
    School of Forestry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Science 315:1666; author reply 1666. 2007
    ..However, if host specificity is related to host abundance, differences in relative host abundance between tropical and temperate regions may limit any general conclusion that herbivore diversity scales directly with host-plant diversity...
  11. pmc The Trojan female technique: a novel, effective and humane approach for pest population control
    Neil J Gemmell
    Centre for Reproduction and Genomics and Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution, Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Perth, Western Australia 6009, Australia, Science and Risk Assessment Directorate, Ministry for Primary Industries, PO Box 2526, Wellington, New Zealand, Landcare Research, Private Bag 1930, Dunedin, New Zealand
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20132549. 2013
    ..The extensive conservation of mtDNA among eukaryotes suggests this approach could have broad utility for pest control. ..
  12. pmc Establishment success of sooty beech scale insects, Ultracoelostoma sp., on different host tree species in New Zealand
    Carl W Wardhaugh
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    J Insect Sci 6:1-9. 2006
    ..The results of this study indicate that beech scale insects perform better on mountain beech at this site, although crawlers did not preferentially establish on mountain beech...
  13. ncbi request reprint An experimental assessment of biodiversity and species turnover in terrestrial vs canopy leaf litter
    Laura L Fagan
    Crop and Food Research, Canterbury Agriculture and Science Centre, Gerald Street, Private Bag 4704, Lincoln, New Zealand
    Oecologia 147:335-47. 2006
    ..While ground and canopy assemblages are similar in total biodiversity, it appears that local mite richness (alpha diversity) is higher on the ground, whereas species turnover between sites (beta diversity) is higher in the canopy...
  14. ncbi request reprint Habitat fragmentation: panchreston or paradigm?
    Robert M Ewers
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:511; author reply 512. 2007
  15. ncbi request reprint Rapid recovery of an insect-plant interaction following habitat loss and experimental wetland restoration
    Corinne H Watts
    Landcare Research, Private Bag 3127, Hamilton, New Zealand
    Oecologia 148:61-9. 2006
    ..These results suggest that some insect-plant interactions can recover rapidly from habitat loss with restoration management...
  16. pmc Pervasive impact of large-scale edge effects on a beetle community
    Robert M Ewers
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:5426-9. 2008
    ....