A F Kopman

Summary

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Residual postoperative paralysis. Pancuronium versus mivacurium, does it matter?
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, USA
    Anesthesiology 85:1253-9. 1996
  2. ncbi request reprint Molar potency is not predictive of the speed of onset of atracurium
    A F Kopman
    Department of Anesthesiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, USA
    Anesth Analg 89:1046-9. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Molar potency is predictive of the speed of onset of neuromuscular block for agents of intermediate, short, and ultrashort duration
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, New York, USA
    Anesthesiology 90:425-31. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Relationship of the train-of-four fade ratio to clinical signs and symptoms of residual paralysis in awake volunteers
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, USA
    Anesthesiology 86:765-71. 1997
  5. ncbi request reprint An alternate method for estimating the dose-response relationships of neuromuscular blocking drugs
    A F Kopman
    Department of Clinical Anesthesiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
    Anesth Analg 90:1191-7. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint The staircase phenomenon: implications for monitoring of neuromuscular transmission
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, USA
    Anesthesiology 95:403-7. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Reexamined: the recommended endotracheal intubating dose for nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers of rapid onset
    A F Kopman
    Department of Anesthesiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
    Anesth Analg 93:954-9. 2001

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint Residual postoperative paralysis. Pancuronium versus mivacurium, does it matter?
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, USA
    Anesthesiology 85:1253-9. 1996
    ..The authors reexamined the incidence of postoperative weakness after the administration of long- and short-acting neuromuscular blockers because few, if any, such comparative studies are available...
  2. ncbi request reprint Molar potency is not predictive of the speed of onset of atracurium
    A F Kopman
    Department of Anesthesiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, USA
    Anesth Analg 89:1046-9. 1999
    ..Potency of a relaxant may not be a reliable predictor of its time to peak effect, when the drug administered is a mixture of isomers with widely different neuromuscular activities...
  3. ncbi request reprint Molar potency is predictive of the speed of onset of neuromuscular block for agents of intermediate, short, and ultrashort duration
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, New York, USA
    Anesthesiology 90:425-31. 1999
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Relationship of the train-of-four fade ratio to clinical signs and symptoms of residual paralysis in awake volunteers
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, USA
    Anesthesiology 86:765-71. 1997
    ..70 to 0.90...
  5. ncbi request reprint An alternate method for estimating the dose-response relationships of neuromuscular blocking drugs
    A F Kopman
    Department of Clinical Anesthesiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
    Anesth Analg 90:1191-7. 2000
    ..Averaging of single-dose estimates of neuromuscular potency provides a useful adjunct and reasonable alternative to conventional regression analysis...
  6. ncbi request reprint The staircase phenomenon: implications for monitoring of neuromuscular transmission
    A F Kopman
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, USA
    Anesthesiology 95:403-7. 2001
    ..If these units are to be used as scientific tools or clinical monitors, additional information regarding how to achieve proper baseline stabilization and calibration is needed...
  7. ncbi request reprint Reexamined: the recommended endotracheal intubating dose for nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers of rapid onset
    A F Kopman
    Department of Anesthesiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
    Anesth Analg 93:954-9. 2001
    ..For muscle relaxants of low potency, doses only 1.5 times the 95% effective dose can provide very satisfactory conditions for intubation if laryngoscopy is delayed to 75 s after drug administration...