Kiwako Sakamoto

Summary

Affiliation: National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Country: Japan

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields following stimulation of the tongue in humans
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 119:1664-73. 2008
  2. doi request reprint A difference exists in somatosensory processing between the anterior and posterior parts of the tongue
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Neurosci Res 66:173-9. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Somatotopic representation of the tongue in human secondary somatosensory cortex
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444 8585, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 119:2125-34. 2008
  4. doi request reprint The effect of mastication on human cognitive processing: a study using event-related potentials
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444 8585, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 120:41-50. 2009
  5. doi request reprint The effect of mastication on human motor preparation processing: a study with CNV and MRCP
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neurosci Res 64:259-66. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Negative BOLD during tongue movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Neurosci Lett 466:120-3. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Executive functions with different motor outputs in somatosensory Go/Nogo tasks: an event-related functional MRI study
    Hiroki Nakata
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Gabriele D Annunzio University Foundation, Chieti, Italy
    Brain Res Bull 77:197-205. 2008
  8. doi request reprint The characteristics of no-go potentials with intraepidermal stimulation
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neuroreport 20:1149-54. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Centrifugal modulation of human LEP components to a task-relevant noxious stimulation triggering voluntary movement
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan
    Neuroimage 45:129-42. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Cortical rhythm of No-go processing in humans: an MEG study
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 124:273-82. 2013

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. doi request reprint Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields following stimulation of the tongue in humans
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 119:1664-73. 2008
    ..To clarify the characteristics relating to the temporal dynamics of the tongue primary somatosensory cortex (SI)...
  2. doi request reprint A difference exists in somatosensory processing between the anterior and posterior parts of the tongue
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Neurosci Res 66:173-9. 2010
    ..The activity in BA 40 and ACC may imply that the posterior of the tongue belongs to the visceral system...
  3. doi request reprint Somatotopic representation of the tongue in human secondary somatosensory cortex
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444 8585, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 119:2125-34. 2008
    ..To clarify the somatotopic representation of the tongue secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) in humans...
  4. doi request reprint The effect of mastication on human cognitive processing: a study using event-related potentials
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444 8585, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 120:41-50. 2009
    ..The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of mastication on cognitive processing using reaction time (RT) and event-related potentials (ERPs)...
  5. doi request reprint The effect of mastication on human motor preparation processing: a study with CNV and MRCP
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neurosci Res 64:259-66. 2009
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Negative BOLD during tongue movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Neurosci Lett 466:120-3. 2009
    ..The areas of Negative BOLD in the PPC and precuneus might reflect specific neural networks relating to voluntary tongue movement...
  7. doi request reprint Executive functions with different motor outputs in somatosensory Go/Nogo tasks: an event-related functional MRI study
    Hiroki Nakata
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Gabriele D Annunzio University Foundation, Chieti, Italy
    Brain Res Bull 77:197-205. 2008
    ..In contrast, the VLPFC was more activated during Count than Movement Go trials. Our results suggest that there were two neural networks for the supramodal executive function, common and uncommon, depending on the required response mode...
  8. doi request reprint The characteristics of no-go potentials with intraepidermal stimulation
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neuroreport 20:1149-54. 2009
    ..We suggest that cortical activities relating to response inhibitory processing are not dependent on the sensory modality used...
  9. doi request reprint Centrifugal modulation of human LEP components to a task-relevant noxious stimulation triggering voluntary movement
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan
    Neuroimage 45:129-42. 2009
    ..The present findings indicate a characteristic of pain-motor integration in a movement preparatory period...
  10. doi request reprint Cortical rhythm of No-go processing in humans: an MEG study
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Clin Neurophysiol 124:273-82. 2013
    ..We investigated the characteristics of cortical rhythmic activity in No-go processing during somatosensory Go/No-go paradigms, by using magnetoencephalography (MEG)...
  11. doi request reprint The relationship in gating effects between short-latency and long-latency somatosensory-evoked potentials
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neuroreport 22:1000-4. 2011
    ..We inferred that the neural activities in movement-related cortices affected the sources for the frontal N30 and vertex N140 in the same neuronal network simultaneously...
  12. doi request reprint Effects of the interstimulus interval on somatosensory go/no-go event-related potentials
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neuroreport 21:1040-4. 2010
    ..The reaction time in go trials was longer with increasing interstimulus interval. This study suggests that brain activities associated with go/no-go decisional processes are influenced by the interstimulus interval...
  13. doi request reprint Negative BOLD effect on somato-motor inhibitory processing: an fMRI study
    Hiroki Nakata
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Gabriele D Annunzio University Foundation, Chieti, Italy
    Neurosci Lett 462:101-4. 2009
    ..We hypothesized several possible explanations for the deactivation of the SFG during no-go trials...
  14. doi request reprint Evoked magnetic fields following noxious laser stimulation of the thigh in humans
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Myodaiji, Okazaki, 444 8585, Japan
    Neuroimage 42:858-68. 2008
    ..The mean peak latencies of SI, cSII, iSII and IPL were 152, 170, 181, and 183 ms, respectively. This is the first study to clarify the time course of the activities of SI, SII, and PPC in human pain processing using MEG...
  15. doi request reprint Characteristics of No-go-P300 component during somatosensory Go/No-go paradigms
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Neurosci Lett 478:124-7. 2010
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Somato-motor inhibitory processing in humans: an event-related functional MRI study
    Hiroki Nakata
    ITAB Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Gabriele D Annunzio University Foundation, Chieti, Italy
    Neuroimage 39:1858-66. 2008
    ..Thus, inhibitory processing would involve two neural networks, common and uncommon regions, depending on the required response mode...
  17. doi request reprint The relationship between reaction time and response variability and somatosensory No-go potentials
    Hiroki Nakata
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
    Eur J Appl Physiol 112:207-14. 2012
    ..Our results suggest that response speed and variability for the Go stimulus in Go/No-go paradigms affect No-go-related neural activity for the No-go stimulus...
  18. pmc Somatosensory processing of the tongue in humans
    Kiwako Sakamoto
    Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences Okazaki, Japan
    Front Physiol 1:136. 2010
    ..It is likely that a difference existed in somatosensory processing of the tongue, particularly around primary somatosensory cortex, Brodmann area 40, and the anterior cingulate cortex...