David Bishop

Summary

Affiliation: University of Verona
Country: Italy

Publications

  1. ncbi An applied research model for the sport sciences
    David Bishop
    Faculty of Motor Science, University of Verona, Via Casorati 43, Verona, Italy
    Sports Med 38:253-63. 2008
  2. ncbi The effect of an intermittent, high-intensity warm-up on supramaximal kayak ergometer performance
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    J Sports Sci 21:13-20. 2003
  3. ncbi The relationship between the VO2 slow component, muscle metabolites and performance during very-heavy exhaustive exercise
    Rob Duffield
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 10:127-34. 2007
  4. ncbi Effects of active versus passive recovery on thermoregulatory strain and performance in intermittent-sprint exercise
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, UWA, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 39:872-9. 2007
  5. ncbi Effects of active warm up on thermoregulation and intermittent-sprint performance in hot conditions
    David Bishop
    Facoltà di Scienze Motorie, Universita degli Studi di Verona, Italy
    J Sci Med Sport 12:196-204. 2009
  6. ncbi Effects of high-intensity training on muscle lactate transporters and postexercise recovery of muscle lactate and hydrogen ions in women
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 295:R1991-8. 2008
  7. ncbi Effects of chronic NaHCO3 ingestion during interval training on changes to muscle buffer capacity, metabolism, and short-term endurance performance
    Johann Edge
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 101:918-25. 2006
  8. ncbi Metabolism and performance in repeated cycle sprints: active versus passive recovery
    Matt Spencer
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:1492-9. 2006
  9. doi Performance and metabolism in repeated sprint exercise: effect of recovery intensity
    Matt Spencer
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 103:545-52. 2008
  10. ncbi High-intensity exercise decreases muscle buffer capacity via a decrease in protein buffering in human skeletal muscle
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
    Pflugers Arch 458:929-36. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications42

  1. ncbi An applied research model for the sport sciences
    David Bishop
    Faculty of Motor Science, University of Verona, Via Casorati 43, Verona, Italy
    Sports Med 38:253-63. 2008
    ....
  2. ncbi The effect of an intermittent, high-intensity warm-up on supramaximal kayak ergometer performance
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    J Sports Sci 21:13-20. 2003
    ..The results of this study indicate that 2 min all-out kayak ergometer performance is significantly better after an intermittent rather than a continuous warm-up...
  3. ncbi The relationship between the VO2 slow component, muscle metabolites and performance during very-heavy exhaustive exercise
    Rob Duffield
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 10:127-34. 2007
    ..Furthermore, it is possible that a reduced perturbation of anaerobic energy sources, as a result of a faster tau(1), may have contributed to a longer t(exh)...
  4. ncbi Effects of active versus passive recovery on thermoregulatory strain and performance in intermittent-sprint exercise
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, UWA, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 39:872-9. 2007
    ..However, team sports are often performed in hot environments for prolonged periods. Therefore, the aim was to investigate the thermal strain of AR versus PR during prolonged, intermittent-sprint exercise...
  5. ncbi Effects of active warm up on thermoregulation and intermittent-sprint performance in hot conditions
    David Bishop
    Facoltà di Scienze Motorie, Universita degli Studi di Verona, Italy
    J Sci Med Sport 12:196-204. 2009
    ..As active warm up did not improve performance (<40min), team-sport athletes may minimise changes in T(re) (and the likelihood of heat illness) by avoiding excessive warm up when competing in the heat...
  6. ncbi Effects of high-intensity training on muscle lactate transporters and postexercise recovery of muscle lactate and hydrogen ions in women
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 295:R1991-8. 2008
    ....
  7. ncbi Effects of chronic NaHCO3 ingestion during interval training on changes to muscle buffer capacity, metabolism, and short-term endurance performance
    Johann Edge
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 101:918-25. 2006
    ....
  8. ncbi Metabolism and performance in repeated cycle sprints: active versus passive recovery
    Matt Spencer
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:1492-9. 2006
    ..To compare active versus passive recovery on performance and metabolism during a test of repeated-sprint ability...
  9. doi Performance and metabolism in repeated sprint exercise: effect of recovery intensity
    Matt Spencer
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 103:545-52. 2008
    ....
  10. ncbi High-intensity exercise decreases muscle buffer capacity via a decrease in protein buffering in human skeletal muscle
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
    Pflugers Arch 458:929-36. 2009
    ....
  11. ncbi Determinants of repeated-sprint ability in females matched for single-sprint performance
    David Bishop
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 97:373-9. 2006
    ..05) to r = -0.50 (p < 0.05). These results indicate that VO2max does contribute to performance during repeated-sprint efforts. However, the small variance in W(dec) explained by VO2max suggests that other factors also play a role...
  12. ncbi Effects of induced metabolic alkalosis on prolonged intermittent-sprint performance
    David Bishop
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 37:759-67. 2005
    ..The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of NaHCO3 ingestion on a prolonged, intermittent-sprint test (IST)...
  13. ncbi Muscle buffer capacity and aerobic fitness are associated with repeated-sprint ability in women
    David Bishop
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 Crawley, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 92:540-7. 2004
    ..This study is the first to identify a relationship between betamin vivo and RSA. This suggests that the ability to buffer H+ may be important for maintaining performance during brief, repeated sprints...
  14. ncbi High-intensity exercise acutely decreases the membrane content of MCT1 and MCT4 and buffer capacity in human skeletal muscle
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The Univ of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 102:616-21. 2007
    ..The implications that these findings have for lactate (and H+) transport following acute, exhaustive exercise warrant further investigation...
  15. ncbi Effects of resistance training on H+ regulation, buffer capacity, and repeated sprints
    Johann Edge
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:2004-11. 2006
    ..We investigated the effects of resistance training on muscle buffer capacity, H regulation, and repeated-sprint ability (RSA)...
  16. ncbi The effects of training intensity on muscle buffer capacity in females
    Johann Edge
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 96:97-105. 2006
    ..This suggests that training intensity is an important determinant of changes to beta m(in vitro)...
  17. ncbi Effects of caffeine on prolonged intermittent-sprint ability in team-sport athletes
    Knut Thomas Schneiker
    Laboratory, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, West Australia, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:578-85. 2006
    ..Little evidence, however, supports an ergogenic effect of caffeine on intermittent-sprint performance. Hence, this study was conducted to examine the effects of acute caffeine ingestion on prolonged intermittent-sprint performance...
  18. ncbi The effects of warm-up on intermittent sprint performance in a hot and humid environment
    Pongson Yaicharoen
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
    J Sports Sci 30:967-74. 2012
    ..Active warm-up did not impair prolonged intermittent-sprint performance in the heat compared with thermoneutral conditions...
  19. ncbi Fatigue in repeated-sprint exercise is related to muscle power factors and reduced neuromuscular activity
    Alberto Mendez-Villanueva
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 103:411-9. 2008
    ..Additionally, a suboptimal net motor unit activity might also impair the ability to repeatedly generate maximum power outputs...
  20. ncbi Reproducibility of a 6-s maximal cycling sprint test
    Alberto Mendez-Villanueva
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, WA, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 10:323-6. 2007
    ..However, the inclusion of an extra familiarization session ensured more stable power outputs. Therefore, two trials should allow adequate familiarization with the maximal 6-s cycling test...
  21. doi Combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity
    Robert Suriano
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 110:753-60. 2010
    ..62:40 ± 5:30, 59:53 ± 4:41 and 58:29 ± 4:40 min; P < 0.05). The results suggest that combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity...
  22. ncbi Physiological and metabolic responses of repeated-sprint activities:specific to field-based team sports
    Matt Spencer
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    Sports Med 35:1025-44. 2005
    ..Assessment of RSA, as a training and research tool, is also discussed...
  23. ncbi Physiological aspects of surfboard riding performance
    Alberto Mendez-Villanueva
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Sports Med 35:55-70. 2005
    ..Further research is needed in all areas of surfing performance in order to gain an understanding of the sport and eventually to bring surfing to the next level of performance...
  24. ncbi Effects of high-intensity interval training on the VO2 response during severe exercise
    Rob Duffield
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 9:249-55. 2006
    ..In contrast to previous moderate-intensity research, a high-intensity interval training program increased A1 and VO2 EE for the same absolute exercise intensity, decreasing the AOD during a severe-intensity CT...
  25. ncbi Physical fitness and performance. Fatigue responses during repeated sprints matched for initial mechanical output
    Alberto Mendez-Villanueva
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 39:2219-25. 2007
    ..To compare muscle fatigability during two sets of repeated cycling sprints matched for initial mechanical output in a nonfatigued and fatigued state...
  26. ncbi Sprint training in preadolescent soccer players
    Massimo Venturelli
    Neuroscienze, Università degli Studi de Verona, Verona, Italy
    Int J Sports Physiol Perform 3:558-62. 2008
    ..It can be hypothesized that running speed with ball improved more in CTG because this particular action requires improvements in coordination...
  27. ncbi Warm up II: performance changes following active warm up and how to structure the warm up
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    Sports Med 33:483-98. 2003
    ..Further research is required to investigate the role of warm up in different environmental conditions, especially for endurance events where a critical core temperature may limit performance...
  28. doi Injury risk factors in young soccer players detected by a multivariate survival model
    Massimo Venturelli
    Department of Neurological, Neuropsychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, University of Verona, Italy
    J Sci Med Sport 14:293-8. 2011
    ..This could be explained by poor player coordination, influencing jumping ability, which may be even more evident in tall young players...
  29. ncbi Induced metabolic alkalosis affects muscle metabolism and repeated-sprint ability
    David Bishop
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 36:807-13. 2004
    ..The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of induced metabolic alkalosis, via sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) ingestion, on muscle metabolism and power output during repeated short-duration cycle sprints...
  30. ncbi Warm up I: potential mechanisms and the effects of passive warm up on exercise performance
    David Bishop
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    Sports Med 33:439-54. 2003
    ..Passive warm up, although not practical for most athletes, also allows one to test the hypothesis that many of the performance changes associated with active warm up can be largely attributed to temperature-related mechanisms...
  31. ncbi Activity profile of world-class professional surfers during competition: a case study
    Alberto Mendez-Villanueva
    Team Sport Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA, Australia
    J Strength Cond Res 20:477-82. 2006
    ..This information can be used to assist in the development of fitness training programs and physiological testing for competitive surfers...
  32. doi Factors modulating post-activation potentiation and its effect on performance of subsequent explosive activities
    Neale Anthony Tillin
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    Sports Med 39:147-66. 2009
    ..Future research should aim to better understand the effect of different conditions on the interaction between PAP and fatigue, with an aim of establishing the specific application (if any) of PAP to sport...
  33. doi Science and medicine of triathlon
    David J Bentley
    J Sci Med Sport 11:361-2. 2008
  34. ncbi Changes in markers of muscle damage, inflammation and HSP70 after an Ironman Triathlon race
    Katsuhiko Suzuki
    Faculty of Human Sciences, Waseda University, 2 579 15 Mikajima Saitama, Tokorozawa, Saitama, Japan
    Eur J Appl Physiol 98:525-34. 2006
    ..HSP70 is released into the circulation as a function of exercise duration...
  35. ncbi Morning versus evening power output and repeated-sprint ability
    Sebastien Racinais
    Laboratoire ACTES, UPRES EA 3596, UFR STAPS U A G, Campus de Fouillole, Pointe A Pitre cedex, Guadeloupe, France
    Chronobiol Int 22:1029-39. 2005
    ..This suggests that the beneficial effect of time-of-day may be limited to a single expression of muscular power and fails to advantage performance during repeated sprints...
  36. ncbi Vitamin and mineral supplementation and neuromuscular recovery after a running race
    Elodie Gauche
    Laboratory of Biomechanics and Physiology, National Institute of the Sport and Physical Education, Paris, France
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:2110-7. 2006
    ..This double-blind study investigated the effects of vitamin and mineral complex supplementation on the neuromuscular function of the knee-extensor muscles after a prolonged trail running race...
  37. ncbi Dynamic pacing strategies during the cycle phase of an Ironman triathlon
    Chris R Abbiss
    School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:726-34. 2006
    ..A nonlinear dynamic systems model has previously been proposed to explain pacing strategies employed during exercise...
  38. ncbi The influence of pacing strategy on VO2 and supramaximal kayak performance
    David Bishop
    Department of Human Movement and Exercise Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 34:1041-7. 2002
    ..The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of manipulating pacing strategy on VO2 and kayak ergometer performance in well-trained paddlers...
  39. ncbi Incremental exercise test design and analysis: implications for performance diagnostics in endurance athletes
    David J Bentley
    School of Medical Sciences, Health and Exercise Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Sports Med 37:575-86. 2007
    ..Sports scientists and coaches should consider these factors when conducting incremental exercise testing for the purposes of performance diagnostics...
  40. ncbi Effects of high- and moderate-intensity training on metabolism and repeated sprints
    Johann Edge
    School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 37:1975-82. 2005
    ..We compared the effects of high-intensity interval (HIT) and moderate-intensity continuous (MIT) training (matched for total work) on changes in repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and muscle metabolism...
  41. ncbi Relation between maximal aerobic power and the ability to repeat sprints in young basketball players
    Carlo Castagna
    School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
    J Strength Cond Res 21:1172-6. 2007
    ..The high blood lactate concentrations found at the end of the repeated-sprint ability protocol suggest its use for building lactate tolerance in conditioned basketball players...
  42. ncbi Comparison of muscle buffer capacity and repeated-sprint ability of untrained, endurance-trained and team-sport athletes
    Johann Edg E
    Team Spart Research Group, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth
    Eur J Appl Physiol 96:225-34. 2006
    ..The greater total work by team-sport athletes was predominantly due to a better performance during the early sprints of the repeated-sprint bout...