M Resti

Summary

Country: Italy

Publications

  1. ncbi Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis C virus
    M Resti
    III Paediatric Clinic, Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Meyer Hospital, Italy
    Ital J Gastroenterol Hepatol 31:489-93. 1999
  2. ncbi Maternal drug use is a preeminent risk factor for mother-to-child hepatitis C virus transmission: results from a multicenter study of 1372 mother-infant pairs
    Massimo Resti
    Pediatric Clinic III, University of Florence and Pediatric Hospital A Meyer, Via Luca Giordano 13, I 50132 Florence, Italy
    J Infect Dis 185:567-72. 2002
  3. ncbi TT virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected mothers and their infants
    M De Martino
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
    J Med Virol 61:347-51. 2000
  4. ncbi Vertical hepatitis C virus transmission is not related to mother-child class-1 HLA concordance
    C Azzari
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children s Hospital, Florence, Italy
    Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol 20:827-31. 2007
  5. ncbi Lack of transmission of TT virus through immunoglobulins
    C Azzari
    Pediatric Clinic III, University of Florence, and the A Meyer Pediatric Hospital, Florence, Italy
    Transfusion 41:1505-8. 2001
  6. ncbi SEN virus co-infection among HCV-RNA-positive mothers, risk of transmission to the offspring and outcome of child infection during a 1-year follow-up
    M Moriondo
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Italy and Paediatric Hospital Anna Meyer, Florence, Italy
    J Viral Hepat 14:355-9. 2007
  7. ncbi Guidelines for the screening and follow-up of infants born to anti-HCV positive mothers
    M Resti
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
    Dig Liver Dis 35:453-7. 2003
  8. ncbi Macrophage activation syndrome in a child affected by malaria: the choice of steroid
    S Trapani
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children s University Hospital, Florence, Italy
    Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol 26:535-9. 2013
  9. ncbi Acute febrile cholestasis as an inaugural manifestation of Kawasaki's disease
    F Falcini
    Rheumatology Unit, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
    Clin Exp Rheumatol 18:779-80. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis C virus
    M Resti
    III Paediatric Clinic, Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Meyer Hospital, Italy
    Ital J Gastroenterol Hepatol 31:489-93. 1999
    ..Progression to chronicity occurs in the majority of perinatally infected children, although hepatitis C virus associated liver disease is usually mild throughout infancy and childhood...
  2. ncbi Maternal drug use is a preeminent risk factor for mother-to-child hepatitis C virus transmission: results from a multicenter study of 1372 mother-infant pairs
    Massimo Resti
    Pediatric Clinic III, University of Florence and Pediatric Hospital A Meyer, Via Luca Giordano 13, I 50132 Florence, Italy
    J Infect Dis 185:567-72. 2002
    ..51; 95% CI, 1.19-1.92; P =.0006), but no association was found with HIV-1 coinfection (AOR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.73-1.33; P =.93). IDU, but not HIV-1 coinfection, seems to be a preeminent risk factor for vertical HCV transmission...
  3. ncbi TT virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected mothers and their infants
    M De Martino
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
    J Med Virol 61:347-51. 2000
    ..TTV infection in HIV 1 infected women is prevalently related to intravenous drug user. The findings suggest that infants may acquire TTV at birth. Infection may persist without evident liver disease...
  4. ncbi Vertical hepatitis C virus transmission is not related to mother-child class-1 HLA concordance
    C Azzari
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children s Hospital, Florence, Italy
    Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol 20:827-31. 2007
    ..30) and when only A and B alleles were evaluated (p=0.59). Mother-infant HLA concordance does not affect HCV vertical transmission...
  5. ncbi Lack of transmission of TT virus through immunoglobulins
    C Azzari
    Pediatric Clinic III, University of Florence, and the A Meyer Pediatric Hospital, Florence, Italy
    Transfusion 41:1505-8. 2001
    ..Viral DNA was demonstrated in commercial preparations of FVIII and F IX, but very few data have been reported on immunoglobulins. The risk of TTV infection associated with intramuscular or IV immunoglobulin administration is unclear...
  6. ncbi SEN virus co-infection among HCV-RNA-positive mothers, risk of transmission to the offspring and outcome of child infection during a 1-year follow-up
    M Moriondo
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Italy and Paediatric Hospital Anna Meyer, Florence, Italy
    J Viral Hepat 14:355-9. 2007
    ..Persistence of SENV infection was demonstrated in 100% of infected children after 1-year follow-up, but none had clinical evidence of liver disease...
  7. ncbi Guidelines for the screening and follow-up of infants born to anti-HCV positive mothers
    M Resti
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
    Dig Liver Dis 35:453-7. 2003
    ....
  8. ncbi Macrophage activation syndrome in a child affected by malaria: the choice of steroid
    S Trapani
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children s University Hospital, Florence, Italy
    Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol 26:535-9. 2013
    ..Clinicians should be aware of this syndrome when malaria does not respond to conventional therapy, since early diagnosis and prompt treatment may dramatically reduce the mortality associated with this condition...
  9. ncbi Acute febrile cholestasis as an inaugural manifestation of Kawasaki's disease
    F Falcini
    Rheumatology Unit, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
    Clin Exp Rheumatol 18:779-80. 2000
    ..We conclude that this syndrome should be suspected in any child with febrile cholestasis of unknown origin, in order that coronary involvement may be prevented by the administration of IVGG...