Natalina Quarto

Summary

Affiliation: Federico II University
Country: Italy

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Molecular cloning and expression study of Xenopus latent TGF-beta binding protein-1 (LTBP-1)
    Natalina Quarto
    Dipartimento di Chimica Biologica, Facoltà di Scienze dell Università di Napoli, Federico II, Napoli, Italy
    Gene 290:53-61. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Age-related changes in the biomolecular mechanisms of calvarial osteoblast biology affect fibroblast growth factor-2 signaling and osteogenesis
    Catherine M Cowan
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:32005-13. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Adipose-derived adult stromal cells heal critical-size mouse calvarial defects
    Catherine M Cowan
    The Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 22:560-7. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Absence of the p53 tumor suppressor gene promotes osteogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells
    Monika Tataria
    Pediatric Surgery Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucille Packard Children s Hospital, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Pediatr Surg 41:624-32; discussion 624-32. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint FGF-2 inhibits osteogenesis in mouse adipose tissue-derived stromal cells and sustains their proliferative and osteogenic potential state
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng 12:1405-18. 2006
  6. doi request reprint Exogenous activation of BMP-2 signaling overcomes TGFβ-mediated inhibition of osteogenesis in Marfan embryonic stem cells and Marfan patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells
    Natalina Quarto
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Stem Cells 30:2709-19. 2012
  7. pmc Skeletogenic phenotype of human Marfan embryonic stem cells faithfully phenocopied by patient-specific induced-pluripotent stem cells
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:215-20. 2012
  8. pmc Origin matters: differences in embryonic tissue origin and Wnt signaling determine the osteogenic potential and healing capacity of frontal and parietal calvarial bones
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 25:1680-94. 2010
  9. pmc Differential FGF ligands and FGF receptors expression pattern in frontal and parietal calvarial bones
    Natalina Quarto
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Cells Tissues Organs 190:158-69. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Temporal and spatial expression of RNases from zebrafish (Danio rerio)
    Natalina Quarto
    Dipartimento di Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Italy
    Gene 427:32-41. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. ncbi request reprint Molecular cloning and expression study of Xenopus latent TGF-beta binding protein-1 (LTBP-1)
    Natalina Quarto
    Dipartimento di Chimica Biologica, Facoltà di Scienze dell Università di Napoli, Federico II, Napoli, Italy
    Gene 290:53-61. 2002
    ..These findings suggest an important role for XLTBP-1 in embryo axis formation...
  2. ncbi request reprint Age-related changes in the biomolecular mechanisms of calvarial osteoblast biology affect fibroblast growth factor-2 signaling and osteogenesis
    Catherine M Cowan
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:32005-13. 2003
    ..Collectively, these findings begin to explain why juvenile, but not adult, osteoblasts successfully heal calvarial defects...
  3. ncbi request reprint Adipose-derived adult stromal cells heal critical-size mouse calvarial defects
    Catherine M Cowan
    The Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 22:560-7. 2004
    ..The contribution of implanted cells to new bone formation was 84-99% by chromosomal detection. These data show that ADAS cells heal critical-size skeletal defects without genetic manipulation or the addition of exogenous growth factors...
  4. ncbi request reprint Absence of the p53 tumor suppressor gene promotes osteogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells
    Monika Tataria
    Pediatric Surgery Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucille Packard Children s Hospital, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Pediatr Surg 41:624-32; discussion 624-32. 2006
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint FGF-2 inhibits osteogenesis in mouse adipose tissue-derived stromal cells and sustains their proliferative and osteogenic potential state
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng 12:1405-18. 2006
    ..These FGF-2 functional characteristics may assist with cell selection and enrichment for the purpose of bone tissue engineering...
  6. doi request reprint Exogenous activation of BMP-2 signaling overcomes TGFβ-mediated inhibition of osteogenesis in Marfan embryonic stem cells and Marfan patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells
    Natalina Quarto
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Stem Cells 30:2709-19. 2012
    ..This study advances our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of bone loss/abnormal skeletogenesis in human diseases caused by mutations in FBN1...
  7. pmc Skeletogenic phenotype of human Marfan embryonic stem cells faithfully phenocopied by patient-specific induced-pluripotent stem cells
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:215-20. 2012
    ....
  8. pmc Origin matters: differences in embryonic tissue origin and Wnt signaling determine the osteogenic potential and healing capacity of frontal and parietal calvarial bones
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 25:1680-94. 2010
    ....
  9. pmc Differential FGF ligands and FGF receptors expression pattern in frontal and parietal calvarial bones
    Natalina Quarto
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Cells Tissues Organs 190:158-69. 2009
    ..Frontal bone also elaborated higher levels of Fgf receptor 1, 2 and 3 transcripts versus parietal bone. Taken together, these data suggest that the frontal bone is a domain with higher FGF-signaling competence than parietal bone...
  10. doi request reprint Temporal and spatial expression of RNases from zebrafish (Danio rerio)
    Natalina Quarto
    Dipartimento di Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Italy
    Gene 427:32-41. 2008
    ..Indeed, taking advantage of zebrafish as an excellent viable model to study gene function, this study opens the way to an investigation of the in vivo role(s) of ZF-RNase-1 during embryonic development, as well as, during organogenesis...
  11. doi request reprint Differential expression of specific FGF ligands and receptor isoforms during osteogenic differentiation of mouse Adipose-derived Stem Cells (mASCs) recapitulates the in vivo osteogenic pattern
    Natalina Quarto
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Gene 424:130-40. 2008
    ..Indeed, this observation further validates ASCs as a suitable resource for skeletal tissue engineering...
  12. doi request reprint Molecular mechanisms of FGF-2 inhibitory activity in the osteogenic context of mouse adipose-derived stem cells (mASCs)
    Natalina Quarto
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Bone 42:1040-52. 2008
    ..Moreover, the present study also indicates that differences exist between mouse and human ASCs in relationship to FGF-2 activity in the osteogenic context...
  13. ncbi request reprint The zebrafish (Danio rerio): a model system for cranial suture patterning
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Cells Tissues Organs 181:109-18. 2005
    ..Indeed, the zebrafish represents a versatile and valuable model system for the study of the biogenesis of cranial sutures...
  14. ncbi request reprint Gene profiling of cells expressing different FGF-2 forms
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Gene 356:49-68. 2005
    ..These results demonstrated that HMWFGF-2 and LMWFGF-2 target the expression of different genes. Particularly, our data suggest that HMWFGF-2 forms may function as inducers of growth inhibition and tumor suppression activities...
  15. doi request reprint Different endogenous threshold levels of Fibroblast Growth Factor-ligands determine the healing potential of frontal and parietal bones
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Bone 47:281-94. 2010
    ..The present study thereby opens new avenues for translational medicine...
  16. doi request reprint Nonintegrating knockdown and customized scaffold design enhances human adipose-derived stem cells in skeletal repair
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Stem Cells 29:2018-29. 2011
    ..This study therefore suggests that genetic targeting of hASCs combined with custom scaffold design can optimize hASCs for skeletal regenerative medicine...
  17. pmc Activation of FGF signaling mediates proliferative and osteogenic differences between neural crest derived frontal and mesoderm parietal derived bone
    Shuli Li
    Department of Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 5:e14033. 2010
    ....
  18. pmc Osteogenic differentiation of mouse adipose-derived adult stromal cells requires retinoic acid and bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB signaling
    Derrick C Wan
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:12335-40. 2006
    ..Our data therefore demonstrate that the osteogenic commitment of multipotent mouse ADAS requires retinoic acid, which enhances expression of the critical BMPR-IB isoform...
  19. ncbi request reprint Sox9 neural crest determinant gene controls patterning and closure of the posterior frontal cranial suture
    David E Sahar
    Department of Surgery, The Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Dev Biol 280:344-61. 2005
    ..These results demonstrate a unique development of the PF suture complex and the role of Sox9 as an important contributor to timely and proper closure of the PF suture through endochondral ossification...
  20. pmc A comparative analysis of the osteogenic effects of BMP-2, FGF-2, and VEGFA in a calvarial defect model
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 18:1079-86. 2012
    ..These data provide a valuable comparative analysis, which can be used to further optimize growth factor-based strategies in skeletal tissue engineering...
  21. pmc CD105 protein depletion enhances human adipose-derived stromal cell osteogenesis through reduction of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 286:39497-509. 2011
    ..These findings thus highlight a potential avenue to promote osteogenesis in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells for skeletal regeneration...
  22. pmc Locally applied vascular endothelial growth factor A increases the osteogenic healing capacity of human adipose-derived stem cells by promoting osteogenic and endothelial differentiation
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Stem Cells 29:286-96. 2011
    ..Thus, locally applied VEGFA might prove to be a valuable growth factor that can mediate both osteogenesis and angiogenesis of multipotent hASCs in the context of bone regeneration...
  23. pmc Differential expression of sclerostin in adult and juvenile mouse calvariae
    Matthew D Kwan
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:595-602. 2011
    ..Thus, the authors compared expression of sclerostin, a bone inhibitor, between the calvariae of juvenile and adult mice...
  24. pmc Integration of multiple signaling regulates through apoptosis the differential osteogenic potential of neural crest-derived and mesoderm-derived Osteoblasts
    Shuli Li
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e58610. 2013
    ..Taken together, our findings demonstrate that integration of multiple signaling pathways contribute to imparting greater osteogenic potential to FOb by decreasing apoptosis...
  25. pmc CD90 (Thy-1)-positive selection enhances osteogenic capacity of human adipose-derived stromal cells
    Michael T Chung
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 19:989-97. 2013
    ..The purpose of the present study was to compare the ability of CD90 (Thy-1) to identify osteoprogenitors relative to CD(105)...
  26. pmc Fgf-18 is required for osteogenesis but not angiogenesis during long bone repair
    Bjorn Behr
    Hagey Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 17:2061-9. 2011
    ..This study provides hints on how to engineering efficiently programmed bony tissue for long bone repair...
  27. pmc Unique modulation of cadherin expression pattern during posterior frontal cranial suture development and closure
    David E Sahar
    Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Cells Tissues Organs 191:401-13. 2010
    ....
  28. pmc Role of GSK-3β in the osteogenic differentiation of palatal mesenchyme
    Emily R Nelson
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e25847. 2011
    ..Using GSK-3ß null mouse embryos, we examine the potential coordinate roles of Wnt and Hedgehog signaling on palatal ossification...
  29. pmc Absence of endochondral ossification and craniosynostosis in posterior frontal cranial sutures of Axin2(-/-) mice
    Bjorn Behr
    Hagey Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 8:e70240. 2013
    ..These data indicated that Axin2(-/-) PF-sutures lack physiological endochondral ossification, contain ectopic cartilage and display delayed suture closure. ..
  30. pmc Chemical control of FGF-2 release for promoting calvarial healing with adipose stem cells
    Matthew D Kwan
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 286:11307-13. 2011
    ..These results suggest that chemically controlled FGF-2 secretion can significantly increase bone formation by ASCs in vivo. This study represents a novel approach toward refining protein delivery for tissue engineering applications...
  31. pmc Opposite spectrum of activity of canonical Wnt signaling in the osteogenic context of undifferentiated and differentiated mesenchymal cells: implications for tissue engineering
    Natalina Quarto
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 16:3185-97. 2010
    ..Indeed, this study has important potential implications for tissue engineering, specifically for repair of juvenile bone defects...
  32. pmc Cranial osteogenesis and suture morphology in Xenopus laevis: a unique model system for studying craniofacial development
    Bethany J Slater
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e3914. 2009
    ..Because of the extended larval period in Xenopus, the molecular basis of these alterations has not been well studied...
  33. ncbi request reprint Dura mater-derived FGF-2 mediates mitogenic signaling in calvarial osteoblasts
    Shuli Li
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 293:C1834-42. 2007
    ....
  34. pmc Fgf-9 is required for angiogenesis and osteogenesis in long bone repair
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:11853-8. 2010
    ..Moreover, this study further supports the embryonic phenotype previously observed in the developing limb, thus promoting the concept that healing processes in adult organisms may recapitulate embryonic skeletal development...
  35. doi request reprint Differential activation of canonical Wnt signaling determines cranial sutures fate: a novel mechanism for sagittal suture craniosynostosis
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Dev Biol 344:922-40. 2010
    ..We propose that regulation of canonical Wnt signaling is of crucial importance during the physiological patterning of PF and SAG sutures. Importantly, dysregulation of this pathway may lead to craniosynostosis...
  36. pmc Integration of multiple signaling pathways determines differences in the osteogenic potential and tissue regeneration of neural crest-derived and mesoderm-derived calvarial bones
    Kshemendra Senarath-Yapa
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Mol Sci 14:5978-97. 2013
    ..Furthermore, we explore recent studies which have provided a tantalizing insight into way these pathways interact, with evidence accumulating for certain transcription factors, such as Runx2, acting as a nexus for cross-talk...
  37. pmc Craniosynostosis of coronal suture in twist1 mice occurs through endochondral ossification recapitulating the physiological closure of posterior frontal suture
    Bjorn Behr
    Hagey Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA, USA
    Front Physiol 2:37. 2011
    ..Moreover, it suggests that haploinsufficiency of Twist1 gene, a target of canonical Wnt-signaling, and inhibitor of chondrogenesis, mimics conditions of inactive canonical Wnt-signaling leading to craniosynostosis...
  38. ncbi request reprint Ribonucleases and angiogenins from fish
    Elio Pizzo
    Department of Structural and Functional Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Complesso M S Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli, Italy
    J Biol Chem 281:27454-60. 2006
    ..They later evolved into both mammalian angiogenins and, through a successful phylogenesis, RNases endowed with digestive features or with diverse bioactivities...