Geraldine Butler

Summary

Affiliation: University College Dublin
Country: Ireland

Publications

  1. pmc Evolution of pathogenicity and sexual reproduction in eight Candida genomes
    Geraldine Butler
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Nature 459:657-62. 2009
  2. pmc Fungal sex and pathogenesis
    Geraldine Butler
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Clin Microbiol Rev 23:140-59. 2010
  3. pmc Chromosomal G + C content evolution in yeasts: systematic interspecies differences, and GC-poor troughs at centromeres
    Denise B Lynch
    Conway Institute of Biomedical and Biomolecular Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Genome Biol Evol 2:572-83. 2010
  4. pmc Conserved and divergent roles of Bcr1 and CFEM proteins in Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans
    Chen Ding
    School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
    PLoS ONE 6:e28151. 2011
  5. pmc Evidence of recent interkingdom horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and Candida parapsilosis
    David A Fitzpatrick
    School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College, Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    BMC Evol Biol 8:181. 2008
  6. pmc Evolution of mating within the Candida parapsilosis species group
    Sixiang Sai
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 10:578-87. 2011
  7. pmc Candida albicans transcription factor Ace2 regulates metabolism and is required for filamentation in hypoxic conditions
    Siobhan M Mulhern
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 5:2001-13. 2006
  8. pmc Regulation of the hypoxic response in Candida albicans
    John M Synnott
    Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 9:1734-46. 2010
  9. pmc Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser
    David A Fitzpatrick
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    BMC Genomics 11:290. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint The Candida albicans CaACE2 gene affects morphogenesis, adherence and virulence
    Mary T Kelly
    Department of Biochemistry, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Mol Microbiol 53:969-83. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. pmc Evolution of pathogenicity and sexual reproduction in eight Candida genomes
    Geraldine Butler
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Nature 459:657-62. 2009
    ..Analysis of the CUG leucine-to-serine genetic-code change reveals that 99% of ancestral CUG codons were erased and new ones arose elsewhere. Lastly, we revise the Candida albicans gene catalogue, identifying many new genes...
  2. pmc Fungal sex and pathogenesis
    Geraldine Butler
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Clin Microbiol Rev 23:140-59. 2010
    ..I provide an overview of how sex is suppressed in different species and discuss the potential associations with pathogenesis...
  3. pmc Chromosomal G + C content evolution in yeasts: systematic interspecies differences, and GC-poor troughs at centromeres
    Denise B Lynch
    Conway Institute of Biomedical and Biomolecular Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Genome Biol Evol 2:572-83. 2010
    ....
  4. pmc Conserved and divergent roles of Bcr1 and CFEM proteins in Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans
    Chen Ding
    School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
    PLoS ONE 6:e28151. 2011
    ..parapsilosis. Our data suggest that the role of the CFEM family in iron acquisition is conserved between C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, but their role in biofilm formation is not...
  5. pmc Evidence of recent interkingdom horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and Candida parapsilosis
    David A Fitzpatrick
    School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College, Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    BMC Evol Biol 8:181. 2008
    ..We refer to these as CTG species because they translate the CTG codon as serine rather than leucine, and share a recent common ancestor...
  6. pmc Evolution of mating within the Candida parapsilosis species group
    Sixiang Sai
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 10:578-87. 2011
    ..It is therefore likely either that mating of C. orthopsilosis takes place under certain unidentified conditions or that the mating pathway has been adapted for other functions, such as cross-species communication...
  7. pmc Candida albicans transcription factor Ace2 regulates metabolism and is required for filamentation in hypoxic conditions
    Siobhan M Mulhern
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 5:2001-13. 2006
    ..We suggest that filamentation is induced in wild-type cells by reducing respiration (using low oxygen or respiratory drugs) and that mutants with increased respiratory activity fail to undergo filamentation under these conditions...
  8. pmc Regulation of the hypoxic response in Candida albicans
    John M Synnott
    Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 9:1734-46. 2010
    ..albicans is complex and is signaled both via lowered sterol levels and other unstudied mechanisms. We also show that induction of filamentation under hypoxic conditions requires the Ras1- and Cdc35-dependent pathway...
  9. pmc Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser
    David A Fitzpatrick
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    BMC Genomics 11:290. 2010
    ..Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome...
  10. ncbi request reprint The Candida albicans CaACE2 gene affects morphogenesis, adherence and virulence
    Mary T Kelly
    Department of Biochemistry, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Mol Microbiol 53:969-83. 2004
    ..The CaAce2 protein is localized to the daughter nucleus of large budded cells at the end of mitosis. C. albicans Ace2p therefore plays a major role in morphogenesis and adherence and resembles S. cerevisiae Ace2p in function...
  11. pmc A genome sequence survey shows that the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis has a defective MTLa1 allele at its mating type locus
    Mary E Logue
    Department of Biochemistry, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 4:1009-17. 2005
    ..It is therefore likely that all (or at least the majority) of C. parapsilosis isolates have a mating pathway that is either defective or substantially different from that of C. albicans...
  12. pmc Development of a gene knockout system in Candida parapsilosis reveals a conserved role for BCR1 in biofilm formation
    Chen Ding
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Eukaryot Cell 6:1310-9. 2007
    ..parapsilosis does not generate true hyphae and that BCR1 regulates the expression of many hypha-specific adhesins in C. albicans...
  13. pmc Using RNA-seq to determine the transcriptional landscape and the hypoxic response of the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis
    Alessandro Guida
    School of Medicine and Medical Science, Conway Institute, UniversityCollege Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    BMC Genomics 12:628. 2011
    ..The transcriptional response of C. parapsilosis to hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions, such as those encountered in the host, is also relatively unexplored...
  14. pmc A fungal phylogeny based on 42 complete genomes derived from supertree and combined gene analysis
    David A Fitzpatrick
    School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    BMC Evol Biol 6:99. 2006
    ..As a tool for future comparative, phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies, we used both supertrees and concatenated alignments to infer relationships between 42 species of fungi for which complete genome sequences are available...
  15. pmc Comparative Genome Analysis and Gene Finding in Candida Species Using CGOB
    Sarah L Maguire
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
    Mol Biol Evol 30:1281-91. 2013
    ..passalidarum and S. stipitis are homothallic. As well as hosting the browser, the CGOB website (http://cgob.ucd.ie) gives direct access to all the underlying genome annotations, sequences, and curated orthology data...
  16. pmc Sequence and analysis of the genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida orthopsilosis
    Alessandro Riccombeni
    School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
    PLoS ONE 7:e35750. 2012
    ..orthopsilosis but not C. parapsilosis, and has a patchy distribution in Candida species. Our results suggest that the difference in virulence between C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis may be associated with expansion of gene families...
  17. pmc Transcriptional response of Candida parapsilosis following exposure to farnesol
    Tristan Rossignol
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 51:2304-12. 2007
    ..There is no effect on expression of C. parapsilosis orthologs of genes involved in hyphal growth in C. albicans. Farnesol therefore differs significantly in its effects on C. parapsilosis and C. albicans...
  18. ncbi request reprint Phenotype switching affects biofilm formation by Candida parapsilosis
    Sean F Laffey
    Department of Biochemistry, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Microbiology 151:1073-81. 2005
    ..The smooth phenotype, however, grows significantly faster than the others. The quorum-sensing molecule farnesol inhibits formation of biofilms by the crepe, concentric and crater phenotypes...
  19. pmc Evolution of the MAT locus and its Ho endonuclease in yeast species
    Geraldine Butler
    Department of Biochemistry, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:1632-7. 2004
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Genomic differences between Candida glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae around the MRPL28 and GCN3 loci
    David W Walsh
    Department of Biochemistry and Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
    Yeast 19:991-4. 2002
    ..cerevisiae chromosome XI (including GCN3) followed by a four-gene cluster similar to chromosome XV (including HIS3). A small-scale rearrangement of gene order has occurred in the chromosome XI-like section...