Anna Lartey

Summary

Affiliation: University of Ghana
Country: Ghana

Publications

  1. ncbi Assessment of gross motor development in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study
    Trudy M Wijnhoven
    Department of Nutrition, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
    Food Nutr Bull 25:S37-45. 2004
  2. ncbi Implementation of the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study in Ghana
    Anna Lartey
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon
    Food Nutr Bull 25:S60-5. 2004
  3. ncbi Infant weight-for-length is positively associated with subsequent linear growth across four different populations
    Kathryn G Dewey
    Department of Nutrition, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, 95616 8669, USA
    Matern Child Nutr 1:11-20. 2005
  4. doi Maternal and child nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa: challenges and interventions
    Anna Lartey
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
    Proc Nutr Soc 67:105-8. 2008
  5. doi Acceptability of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) among Ghanaian infants and pregnant or lactating women
    Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana
    Matern Child Nutr 7:344-56. 2011
  6. ncbi Complementary feeding strategies to improve child growth in developing countries
    Anna Lartey
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon
    Forum Nutr 56:240-3. 2003
  7. ncbi Home fortification of complementary foods with micronutrient supplements is well accepted and has positive effects on infant iron status in Ghana
    Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    Program in International and Community Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 8669, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 87:929-38. 2008
  8. ncbi Lactation counseling increases exclusive breast-feeding rates in Ghana
    Bridget A Aidam
    Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
    J Nutr 135:1691-5. 2005
  9. ncbi Randomized comparison of 3 types of micronutrient supplements for home fortification of complementary foods in Ghana: effects on growth and motor development
    Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    Program in International Nutrition and Community Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 8669, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 86:412-20. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi Assessment of gross motor development in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study
    Trudy M Wijnhoven
    Department of Nutrition, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
    Food Nutr Bull 25:S37-45. 2004
    ..Data collection and data quality control took place simultaneously. Data verification and cleaning were performed until all queries had been satisfactorily resolved...
  2. ncbi Implementation of the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study in Ghana
    Anna Lartey
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon
    Food Nutr Bull 25:S60-5. 2004
    ..Conversely, the high rates of breastfeeding and general support for this practice greatly facilitated the implementation of the MGRS protocol...
  3. ncbi Infant weight-for-length is positively associated with subsequent linear growth across four different populations
    Kathryn G Dewey
    Department of Nutrition, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, 95616 8669, USA
    Matern Child Nutr 1:11-20. 2005
    ..The consistency of this relationship across studies supports the hypothesis that linear growth is partly regulated by initial body mass or fatness in infants...
  4. doi Maternal and child nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa: challenges and interventions
    Anna Lartey
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
    Proc Nutr Soc 67:105-8. 2008
    ..The recent release by WHO of new international growth standards for assessing the growth and nutritional status of children provides the tool for early detection of growth faltering and for appropriate intervention...
  5. doi Acceptability of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) among Ghanaian infants and pregnant or lactating women
    Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana
    Matern Child Nutr 7:344-56. 2011
    ..During the 14-day period, median daily consumption of LNS-20gM was 19.3 g, very close to the recommended 20 g d(-1), while that of LNS-P&L was one sachet, as recommended. We conclude that LNS-20gM and LNS-P&L were well accepted...
  6. ncbi Complementary feeding strategies to improve child growth in developing countries
    Anna Lartey
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon
    Forum Nutr 56:240-3. 2003
  7. ncbi Home fortification of complementary foods with micronutrient supplements is well accepted and has positive effects on infant iron status in Ghana
    Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    Program in International and Community Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 8669, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 87:929-38. 2008
    ..Micronutrient deficiencies are common during infancy, and optimal approaches for their prevention need to be identified...
  8. ncbi Lactation counseling increases exclusive breast-feeding rates in Ghana
    Bridget A Aidam
    Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
    J Nutr 135:1691-5. 2005
    ..5%) than among C (19.6%). The 100% increase in EBF rates can be attributed to the lactation counseling provided. Additional prenatal EBF support may not be needed within a context of strong routine prenatal EBF education...
  9. ncbi Randomized comparison of 3 types of micronutrient supplements for home fortification of complementary foods in Ghana: effects on growth and motor development
    Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    Program in International Nutrition and Community Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 8669, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 86:412-20. 2007
    ..A potential low-cost solution is the home fortification of complementary foods with Sprinkles (SP) powder, crushable Nutritabs (NT) tablets, or energy-dense (108 kcal/d), fat-based Nutributter (NB)...