Martin Parniske

Summary

Affiliation: University of Munich
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhiza: the mother of plant root endosymbioses
    Martin Parniske
    Faculty of Biology, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Strasse 2 4, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:763-75. 2008
  2. pmc Lotus japonicus E3 ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA4 destabilizes the symbiosis receptor-like kinase SYMRK and negatively regulates rhizobial infection
    Griet Den Herder
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich, 82152 Martinsried, Germany
    Plant Cell 24:1691-707. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Activation of a Lotus japonicus subtilase gene during arbuscular mycorrhiza is dependent on the common symbiosis genes and two cis-active promoter regions
    Naoya Takeda
    University of Munich, Martinsried, Germany
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 24:662-70. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Polymorphic infection and organogenesis patterns induced by a Rhizobium leguminosarum isolate from Lotus root nodules are determined by the host genotype
    Jasmin A Gossmann
    Faculty of Biology, Genetics, University of Munich LMU, Grosshaderner Strasse 2 4, 82152, Martinsried, Germany
    New Phytol 196:561-73. 2012
  5. pmc Lotus japonicus CASTOR and POLLUX are ion channels essential for perinuclear calcium spiking in legume root endosymbiosis
    Myriam Charpentier
    Ludwig Maximilians Universitat Munchen, Faculty of Biology, Genetics, 80638 Munchen, Germany
    Plant Cell 20:3467-79. 2008
  6. pmc Functional domain analysis of the Remorin protein LjSYMREM1 in Lotus japonicus
    Katalin Toth
    Department of Genetics, University of Munich, Martinsried, Germany
    PLoS ONE 7:e30817. 2012
  7. doi request reprint Apoplastic plant subtilases support arbuscular mycorrhiza development in Lotus japonicus
    Naoya Takeda
    Faculty of Biology, Genetics, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Strasse 2, Martinsried, Germany
    Plant J 58:766-77. 2009
  8. pmc The temperature-sensitive brush mutant of the legume Lotus japonicus reveals a link between root development and nodule infection by rhizobia
    Makoto Maekawa-Yoshikawa
    University of Munich, 82152 Munich Martinsried, Germany
    Plant Physiol 149:1785-96. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Two Lotus japonicus symbiosis mutants impaired at distinct steps of arbuscule development
    Martin Groth
    Faculty of Biology, Genetics, University of Munich, Großhaderner Straße 2 4, 82152, Martinsried, Germany
    Plant J 75:117-29. 2013
  10. doi request reprint Activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), the central regulator of plant root endosymbiosis
    Sylvia Singh
    Genetics, University of Munich, 82152 Martinsried, Germany
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 15:444-53. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. doi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhiza: the mother of plant root endosymbioses
    Martin Parniske
    Faculty of Biology, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Strasse 2 4, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:763-75. 2008
    ....
  2. pmc Lotus japonicus E3 ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA4 destabilizes the symbiosis receptor-like kinase SYMRK and negatively regulates rhizobial infection
    Griet Den Herder
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich, 82152 Martinsried, Germany
    Plant Cell 24:1691-707. 2012
    ..Our results implicate SINA4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in the turnover of SYMRK and provide a conceptual mechanism for its symbiosis-appropriate spatio-temporal containment...
  3. doi request reprint Activation of a Lotus japonicus subtilase gene during arbuscular mycorrhiza is dependent on the common symbiosis genes and two cis-active promoter regions
    Naoya Takeda
    University of Munich, Martinsried, Germany
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 24:662-70. 2011
    ..Sequence-related regions were found in the promoters of AM-induced subtilase genes in Medicago truncatula and rice, consistent with an ancient origin of these elements predating the divergence of the angiosperms...
  4. doi request reprint Polymorphic infection and organogenesis patterns induced by a Rhizobium leguminosarum isolate from Lotus root nodules are determined by the host genotype
    Jasmin A Gossmann
    Faculty of Biology, Genetics, University of Munich LMU, Grosshaderner Strasse 2 4, 82152, Martinsried, Germany
    New Phytol 196:561-73. 2012
    ..loti strains. These contrasting infection and organogenesis phenotypes reveal recent diversification of recognition determinants in Lotus...
  5. pmc Lotus japonicus CASTOR and POLLUX are ion channels essential for perinuclear calcium spiking in legume root endosymbiosis
    Myriam Charpentier
    Ludwig Maximilians Universitat Munchen, Faculty of Biology, Genetics, 80638 Munchen, Germany
    Plant Cell 20:3467-79. 2008
    ..They could either trigger the opening of calcium release channels or compensate the charge release during the calcium efflux as counter ion channels...
  6. pmc Functional domain analysis of the Remorin protein LjSYMREM1 in Lotus japonicus
    Katalin Toth
    Department of Genetics, University of Munich, Martinsried, Germany
    PLoS ONE 7:e30817. 2012
    ..These data provide novel insights into the mechanism of this putative molecular scaffold protein and underline its importance during rhizobial infection...
  7. doi request reprint Apoplastic plant subtilases support arbuscular mycorrhiza development in Lotus japonicus
    Naoya Takeda
    Faculty of Biology, Genetics, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Strasse 2, Martinsried, Germany
    Plant J 58:766-77. 2009
    ..Our data indicate a role for these subtilases during the fungal infection process in particular arbuscule development...
  8. pmc The temperature-sensitive brush mutant of the legume Lotus japonicus reveals a link between root development and nodule infection by rhizobia
    Makoto Maekawa-Yoshikawa
    University of Munich, 82152 Munich Martinsried, Germany
    Plant Physiol 149:1785-96. 2009
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Two Lotus japonicus symbiosis mutants impaired at distinct steps of arbuscule development
    Martin Groth
    Faculty of Biology, Genetics, University of Munich, Großhaderner Straße 2 4, 82152, Martinsried, Germany
    Plant J 75:117-29. 2013
    ..Both mutants formed wild-type-like root nodules upon inoculation with Mesorhizobium loti, indicating that the mutated loci are essential during AM but not during root nodule symbiosis...
  10. doi request reprint Activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), the central regulator of plant root endosymbiosis
    Sylvia Singh
    Genetics, University of Munich, 82152 Martinsried, Germany
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 15:444-53. 2012
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Evolution of root endosymbiosis with bacteria: How novel are nodules?
    Katharina Markmann
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, Ludwig Maximilians Universitat, Munich, Germany
    Trends Plant Sci 14:77-86. 2009
    ..Since RNS uses genetic programs that are widely conserved in land plants, we evaluate the prospects for a transfer to plants that are currently non-nodulating...
  12. doi request reprint The unbearable naivety of legumes in symbiosis
    Griet Den Herder
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich LMU, Martinsried Munchen, Germany
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 12:491-9. 2009
    ..Strategies towards increased nitrogen fixation of legumes in agriculture need to encompass this diversification of mechanisms...
  13. pmc RNA-seq pinpoints a Xanthomonas TAL-effector activated resistance gene in a large-crop genome
    Tina Strauss
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, Ludwig Maximilians University, D 82152 Munich Martinsried, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:19480-5. 2012
    ..These findings demonstrate that TALE-specific R genes can be cloned from large-genome crops with a highly efficient RNA-seq approach...
  14. doi request reprint Receptor kinase signaling pathways in plant-microbe interactions
    Meritxell Antolín-Llovera
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich LMU, 82152 Martinsried, Germany
    Annu Rev Phytopathol 50:451-73. 2012
    ..In this review, we focus on RLKs involved in plant-microbe interactions and contrast the signaling pathways leading to symbiosis and defense...
  15. pmc Functional adaptation of a plant receptor-kinase paved the way for the evolution of intracellular root symbioses with bacteria
    Katharina Markmann
    Genetics, Faculty of Biology, Ludwig Maximilians Universitat, Munich, Germany
    PLoS Biol 6:e68. 2008
    ..Our data support the idea that SYMRK sequence evolution was involved in the recruitment of a pre-existing signalling network from AM, paving the way for the evolution of intracellular root symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria...
  16. pmc SymRK defines a common genetic basis for plant root endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, rhizobia, and Frankiabacteria
    Hassen Gherbi
    Equipe Rhizogenèse, Unité Mixte de Recherche Diversité et Adaptation des Plantes Cultivées DIAPC, Institut de recherche pour le developpement IRD, 911 Avenue Agropolis, 34394 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:4928-32. 2008
    ..Taken together, our results demonstrate that SymRK functions as a vital component of the genetic basis for both plant-fungal and plant-bacterial endosymbioses and is conserved between legumes and actinorhiza-forming Fagales...
  17. pmc NUCLEOPORIN85 is required for calcium spiking, fungal and bacterial symbioses, and seed production in Lotus japonicus
    Katsuharu Saito
    Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332 0012, Japan
    Plant Cell 19:610-24. 2007
    ..Together with symbiotic nucleoporin NUP133, L. japonicus NUP85 might be part of a specific nuclear pore subcomplex that is crucial for fungal and rhizobial colonization and seed production...
  18. ncbi request reprint Identification of symbiotically defective mutants of Lotus japonicus affected in infection thread growth
    Fabien Lombardo
    John Innes Centre, Colney Lane, NR4 7UH, Norwich, UK
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 19:1444-50. 2006
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Evolution of signal transduction in intracellular symbiosis
    Catherine Kistner
    The Sainsbury Laboratory, John Innes Centre, Colney Lane, Norwich, UK NR4 7UH
    Trends Plant Sci 7:511-8. 2002
    ..Analysis of symbiotic mutants of host plants and bacterial microsymbionts has revealed that present-day endosymbioses require the coordinated induction of more than one signalling pathway for development...
  20. ncbi request reprint Plant biology: fixation with regulation
    J Allan Downie
    Nature 420:369-70. 2002
  21. ncbi request reprint Plant biology: locks, keys and symbioses
    Martin Parniske
    Nature 425:569-70. 2003
  22. ncbi request reprint Plastid proteins crucial for symbiotic fungal and bacterial entry into plant roots
    Haruko Imaizumi-Anraku
    National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 2 1 2 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8602, Japan
    Nature 433:527-31. 2005
    ..Surprisingly, both twin proteins are localized in the plastids of root cells, indicating a previously unrecognized role of this ancient endosymbiont in controlling intracellular symbioses that evolved more recently...
  23. ncbi request reprint Plant-fungal associations: cue for the branching connection
    Martin Parniske
    Nature 435:750-1. 2005
  24. ncbi request reprint A plant receptor-like kinase required for both bacterial and fungal symbiosis
    Silke Stracke
    The Sainsbury Laboratory, John Innes Centre, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK
    Nature 417:959-62. 2002
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Common symbiosis genes of Lotus japonicus are not required for intracellular accommodation of the rust fungus Uromyces loti
    Denny Mellersh
    New Phytol 170:641-4. 2006
  26. ncbi request reprint Genetic suppressors of the Lotus japonicus har1-1 hypernodulation phenotype
    Jeremy Murray
    Agriculture and Agri Food Canada, Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, 1391 Sandford Street, London, Ontario N5V 4T3, Canada
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 19:1082-91. 2006
    ..japonicus. To facilitate mapping of the latter class of mutants, an introgression line, in which the har1-1 allele was introduced into a polymorphic background of L. japonicus ecotype MG20, was constructed...
  27. ncbi request reprint Transcriptome analysis of Arabidopsis clubroots indicate a key role for cytokinins in disease development
    Johannes Siemens
    Institute für Botanik, Freie Universitat Berlin, Albrecht Thaer Weg 6, 14195 Berlin, Germany
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 19:480-94. 2006
    ..Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase overexpressing lines were disease resistant, clearly indicating the importance of cytokinin as a key factor in clubroot disease development...
  28. pmc A genetic linkage map of the model legume Lotus japonicus and strategies for fast mapping of new loci
    Niels Sandal
    Laboratory of Gene Expression, Department of Molecular and Structural Biology, University of Aarhus, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
    Genetics 161:1673-83. 2002
    ..A fast method to position genetic loci employing three AFLP primer combinations yielding 89 markers was developed and evaluated by mapping three symbiotic loci, Ljsym1, Ljsym5, and Ljhar1-3...
  29. pmc TILLING mutants of Lotus japonicus reveal that nitrogen assimilation and fixation can occur in the absence of nodule-enhanced sucrose synthase
    Irmtraud Horst
    Metabolic Biology, John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UH, United Kingdom
    Plant Physiol 144:806-20. 2007
    ..Thus, nitrogen fixation can occur in L. japonicus nodules even in the absence of LjSUS3 (the major nodule-induced isoform of SUS), so LjSUS1 must also contribute to the maintenance of nitrogen assimilation...
  30. ncbi request reprint Proteases in plant root symbiosis
    Naoya Takeda
    Genetics, Biology Department, University of Munich LMU, Ludwig Maxmilians Universität München, Maria Ward Strasse 1a, D 80638 Munich, Germany
    Phytochemistry 68:111-21. 2007
    ..However, the precise function of these symbiosis-induced proteases remains unknown. Here we present a compilation of the symbiosis-induced proteases identified so far and discuss their possible roles in symbiosis...
  31. pmc Lotus japonicus nodulation requires two GRAS domain regulators, one of which is functionally conserved in a non-legume
    Anne B Heckmann
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, John Innes Centre, Norwich NR4 7UH, United Kingdom
    Plant Physiol 142:1739-50. 2006
    ..These observations suggest that NSP1 is also involved in infection, bacterial release, and normal bacteroid formation in nodule cells...
  32. ncbi request reprint Molecular genetics of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis
    Martin Parniske
    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 7:414-21. 2004
    ..Moreover, evidence of a diffusible fungal signalling factor that triggers gene activation in the root has recently been obtained...
  33. ncbi request reprint Deregulation of a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase leads to spontaneous nodule development
    Leïla Tirichine
    Nature 441:1153-6. 2006
    ..Our results reveal a key regulatory position of CCaMK upstream of all components required for cell-cycle activation, and a phenotypically divergent series of mutant alleles demonstrates positive and negative regulation of the process...
  34. ncbi request reprint Genetics of symbiosis in Lotus japonicus: recombinant inbred lines, comparative genetic maps, and map position of 35 symbiotic loci
    Niels Sandal
    Laboratory of Gene Expression, Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej, Aarhus C, Denmark
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 19:80-91. 2006
    ..Altogether, this establishes a common genetic resource for Lotus spp. A web-based version will enable this resource to be curated and updated regularly...
  35. pmc Seven Lotus japonicus genes required for transcriptional reprogramming of the root during fungal and bacterial symbiosis
    Catherine Kistner
    Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich NR4 7UH, United Kingdom
    Plant Cell 17:2217-29. 2005
    ..By contrast, AM fungus-induced gene repression appeared to be unaffected in mutant backgrounds, which indicates the presence of additional independent signaling pathways...