John Parsch

Summary

Country: Germany

Publications

  1. pmc Population and sex differences in Drosophila melanogaster brain gene expression
    Ana Catalan
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, Grosshaderner Str 2, Planegg Martinsried 82152, Germany
    BMC Genomics 13:654. 2012
  2. doi request reprint The evolutionary causes and consequences of sex-biased gene expression
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, Grosshaderner Strasse 2, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Nat Rev Genet 14:83-7. 2013
  3. pmc On the utility of short intron sequences as a reference for the detection of positive and negative selection in Drosophila
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich, Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 27:1226-34. 2010
  4. doi request reprint The influence of demography and weak selection on the McDonald-Kreitman test: an empirical study in Drosophila
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology, University of Munich, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 26:691-8. 2009
  5. pmc Molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in the Drosophila ananassae subgroup
    Sonja Grath
    Department of Biology, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany
    BMC Evol Biol 9:291. 2009
  6. pmc Effects of X-linkage and sex-biased gene expression on the rate of adaptive protein evolution in Drosophila
    John F Baines
    Section of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Biology, University of Munich, 82152 Munich, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 25:1639-50. 2008
  7. pmc Population transcriptomics of Drosophila melanogaster females
    Lena Müller
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    BMC Genomics 12:81. 2011
  8. pmc Gene expression variation in African and European populations of Drosophila melanogaster
    Stephan Hutter
    Section of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Biology, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Strasse, Planegg Martinsried 82152, Germany
    Genome Biol 9:R12. 2008
  9. pmc Functional analysis of Drosophila melanogaster gene regulatory sequences by transgene coplacement
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, Section of Evolutionary Biology, University of Munich LMU, 80333, Germany
    Genetics 168:559-61. 2004
  10. doi request reprint Selective sweep of a cis-regulatory sequence in a non-African population of Drosophila melanogaster
    Sarah S Saminadin-Peter
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich, Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 29:1167-74. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. pmc Population and sex differences in Drosophila melanogaster brain gene expression
    Ana Catalan
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, Grosshaderner Str 2, Planegg Martinsried 82152, Germany
    BMC Genomics 13:654. 2012
    ....
  2. doi request reprint The evolutionary causes and consequences of sex-biased gene expression
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, Grosshaderner Strasse 2, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Nat Rev Genet 14:83-7. 2013
    ..Here we highlight new findings regarding the causes of sex-biased expression, including sexual antagonism and incomplete dosage compensation. We also discuss how sex-biased expression can accelerate the evolution of sex-linked genes...
  3. pmc On the utility of short intron sequences as a reference for the detection of positive and negative selection in Drosophila
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich, Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 27:1226-34. 2010
    ..Although there is little signal of selection on the primary sequence of short introns, patterns of insertion-deletion polymorphism and divergence suggest that both positive and negative selection act to maintain an optimal intron length...
  4. doi request reprint The influence of demography and weak selection on the McDonald-Kreitman test: an empirical study in Drosophila
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology, University of Munich, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 26:691-8. 2009
    ..This is inconsistent with currently accepted demographic scenarios and may reflect female-specific changes in selective constraint following the colonization of non-African habitats...
  5. pmc Molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in the Drosophila ananassae subgroup
    Sonja Grath
    Department of Biology, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany
    BMC Evol Biol 9:291. 2009
    ..For 43 of these genes we surveyed DNA sequence polymorphism in a natural population of D. ananassae and determined divergence to the sister species D. atripex and D. phaeopleura...
  6. pmc Effects of X-linkage and sex-biased gene expression on the rate of adaptive protein evolution in Drosophila
    John F Baines
    Section of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Biology, University of Munich, 82152 Munich, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 25:1639-50. 2008
    ....
  7. pmc Population transcriptomics of Drosophila melanogaster females
    Lena Müller
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    BMC Genomics 12:81. 2011
    ..Gene expression variation among males of the same strains was reported previously...
  8. pmc Gene expression variation in African and European populations of Drosophila melanogaster
    Stephan Hutter
    Section of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Biology, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Strasse, Planegg Martinsried 82152, Germany
    Genome Biol 9:R12. 2008
    ..However, previous expression surveys in this species generally focused on a small number of laboratory strains established from derived populations. Thus, these studies were not ideal for population genetic analyses...
  9. pmc Functional analysis of Drosophila melanogaster gene regulatory sequences by transgene coplacement
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, Section of Evolutionary Biology, University of Munich LMU, 80333, Germany
    Genetics 168:559-61. 2004
    ..This method shows that a sequence in the Adh 3'-untranslated region negatively regulates expression, independent of gene or chromosomal context...
  10. doi request reprint Selective sweep of a cis-regulatory sequence in a non-African population of Drosophila melanogaster
    Sarah S Saminadin-Peter
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich, Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 29:1167-74. 2012
    ..Selection appears to have favored a quantitative increase in gene expression in the Malphigian tubule, the tissue where CG9509 is predominantly expressed...
  11. pmc Patterns of synonymous codon usage in Drosophila melanogaster genes with sex-biased expression
    Tina M Hambuch
    Section of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, 82152 Munich, Germany
    Genetics 170:1691-700. 2005
    ..We propose that the observed codon bias differences result from differences in selection at synonymous and/or linked nonsynonymous sites between genes with male- and female-biased expression...
  12. ncbi request reprint Molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in Drosophila
    Zhi Zhang
    Department of Biology II, Section of Evolutionary Biology, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 21:2130-9. 2004
    ..melanogaster, and comparisons of polymorphism/divergence ratios suggest that the rapid evolution of male-biased genes is caused by positive selection...
  13. pmc Pleiotropic effect of disrupting a conserved sequence involved in a long-range compensatory interaction in the Drosophila Adh gene
    John F Baines
    Department of Biology II, Section of Evolutionary Biology, University of Munich, 80333 Munich, Germany
    Genetics 166:237-42. 2004
    ..We find that a classical result was not observed due to the pleiotropic effect of changing a nucleotide involved in both long-range base pairing and the negative regulation of gene expression...
  14. pmc X chromosome inactivation during Drosophila spermatogenesis
    Winfried Hense
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich, Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    PLoS Biol 5:e273. 2007
    ..These results are consistent with global inactivation of the X chromosome in the male germline and support a selective explanation for X chromosome avoidance of genes with beneficial effects late in spermatogenesis...
  15. pmc Selective constraints on intron evolution in Drosophila
    John Parsch
    Department of Biology II, Section of Evolutionary Biology, University of Munich LMU, Munich 80333, Germany
    Genetics 165:1843-51. 2003
    ..This indicates that intron-specific selective constraints have been maintained following gene duplication, which preceded the divergence of the D. melanogaster species subgroup...
  16. pmc Widespread adaptive evolution of Drosophila genes with sex-biased expression
    Matthias Pröschel
    Section of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, 82152 Munich, Germany
    Genetics 174:893-900. 2006
    ..melanogaster and D. simulans. This suggests that sexual selection and intersexual coevolution are the major forces driving genetic differentiation between species...
  17. doi request reprint Fine-scale analysis of X chromosome inactivation in the male germ line of Drosophila melanogaster
    Claus Kemkemer
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany
    Mol Biol Evol 28:1561-3. 2011
    ..There was no evidence for regions of the X chromosome escaping inactivation, including cytological region 19, which appears to be a hot spot for newly evolved, testis-expressed genes...
  18. pmc Dissecting gene expression in mosquito
    Rayna Stamboliyska
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich, Grosshaderner Str 2, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    BMC Genomics 12:297. 2011
    ..gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster...
  19. pmc Inter- and intraspecific variation in Drosophila genes with sex-biased expression
    Lena Müller
    Department of Biology II, University of Munich LMU, 82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany
    Int J Evol Biol 2012:963976. 2012
    ..In D. ananassae, there is no increased rate of adaptation of male-biased genes, suggesting that the type or strength of selection acting on sex-biased genes differs between lineages...