M Tomasello

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The emergence of social cognition in three young chimpanzees
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 70:vii-132. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Origins of human cooperation and morality
    Michael Tomasello
    Department of Developmental Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Annu Rev Psychol 64:231-55. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Why be nice? Better not think about it
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Trends Cogn Sci 16:580-1. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Do young children have adult syntactic competence?
    M Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstrasse 22, D 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 74:209-53. 2000
  5. ncbi request reprint Understanding and sharing intentions: the origins of cultural cognition
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Behav Brain Sci 28:675-91; discussion 691-735. 2005
  6. doi request reprint Assessing the validity of ape-human comparisons: a reply to Boesch (2007)
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    J Comp Psychol 122:449-52. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint The role of humans in the cognitive development of apes revisited
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 7:213-5. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Syntax or semantics? Response to Lidz et al
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstrasse 22, Leipzig D04102, Germany
    Cognition 93:139-40; discussion 157-65. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Sampling children's spontaneous speech: how much is enough?
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Child Lang 31:101-21. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Reliance on head versus eyes in the gaze following of great apes and human infants: the cooperative eye hypothesis
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 52:314-20. 2007

Detail Information

Publications87

  1. ncbi request reprint The emergence of social cognition in three young chimpanzees
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 70:vii-132. 2005
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Origins of human cooperation and morality
    Michael Tomasello
    Department of Developmental Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Annu Rev Psychol 64:231-55. 2013
    ..Human morality arose evolutionarily as a set of skills and motives for cooperating with others, and the ontogeny of these skills and motives unfolds in part naturally and in part as a result of sociocultural contexts and interactions...
  3. doi request reprint Why be nice? Better not think about it
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Trends Cogn Sci 16:580-1. 2012
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Do young children have adult syntactic competence?
    M Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstrasse 22, D 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 74:209-53. 2000
    ..The framework of an alternative, usage-based theory of child language acquisition - relying explicitly on new models from Cognitive-Functional Linguistics - is presented...
  5. ncbi request reprint Understanding and sharing intentions: the origins of cultural cognition
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Behav Brain Sci 28:675-91; discussion 691-735. 2005
    ..The developmental outcome is children's ability to construct dialogic cognitive representations, which enable them to participate in earnest in the collectivity that is human cognition...
  6. doi request reprint Assessing the validity of ape-human comparisons: a reply to Boesch (2007)
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    J Comp Psychol 122:449-52. 2008
    ..Although difficult, with appropriate methodological care, experimental cross-species comparisons may be validly made...
  7. ncbi request reprint The role of humans in the cognitive development of apes revisited
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 7:213-5. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Syntax or semantics? Response to Lidz et al
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstrasse 22, Leipzig D04102, Germany
    Cognition 93:139-40; discussion 157-65. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Sampling children's spontaneous speech: how much is enough?
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Child Lang 31:101-21. 2004
    ..Implications of these results for various issues in the study of child language acquisition are discussed...
  10. ncbi request reprint Reliance on head versus eyes in the gaze following of great apes and human infants: the cooperative eye hypothesis
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 52:314-20. 2007
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Methodological challenges in the study of primate cognition
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Science 334:1227-8. 2011
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint A tale of two theories: response to Fisher
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstrasse 22, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 83:207-14. 2002
  13. ncbi request reprint A new look at infant pointing
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 78:705-22. 2007
    ..g., joint intentions and attention with others). Children's early linguistic skills are built on this already existing platform of prelinguistic communication...
  14. ncbi request reprint Shared intentionality
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 10:121-5. 2007
    ..We conclude by highlighting the role that shared intentionality may play in integrating more biologically based and more culturally based theories of human development...
  15. ncbi request reprint What paradox? A response to Naigles (2002)
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstrasse 22, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 88:317-23; author's reply: 325-9. 2003
  16. doi request reprint Collaboration in young children
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 65:1-12. 2012
    ..This form of collaborative interaction is underlain by species-unique skills and motivations for shared intentionality that make possible, ultimately, such things as complex cultural institutions...
  17. ncbi request reprint Understanding attention: 12- and 18-month-olds know what is new for other persons
    Michael Tomasello
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 39:906-12. 2003
    ..Infants at both ages did this successfully, lending support to the hypothesis that 1-year-old infants possess a genuine understanding of other persons as intentional and attentional agents...
  18. doi request reprint Young German children's early syntactic competence: a preferential looking study
    Miriam Dittmar
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland
    Dev Sci 11:575-82. 2008
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Young children's understanding of joint commitments
    Maria Gräfenhain
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 45:1430-43. 2009
    ..By 3 years of age, children thus recognize both when an adult is committed and when they themselves are committed to a joint activity...
  20. ncbi request reprint Great apes' understanding of other individuals' line of sight
    Sanae Okamoto-Barth
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Psychol Sci 18:462-8. 2007
    ..Great apes' perspective-taking skills seem to have increased in the evolutionary lineage leading to bonobos, chimpanzees, and humans...
  21. doi request reprint Can chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) discriminate appearance from reality?
    Carla Krachun
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 112:435-50. 2009
    ..5-year-olds passed. Our study constitutes the first direct investigation of appearance-reality understanding in chimpanzees and the first cross-species comparison of this capacity...
  22. doi request reprint A competitive nonverbal false belief task for children and apes
    Carla Krachun
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 12:521-35. 2009
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint German children's productivity with tense morphology: the Perfekt (present perfect)
    Angelika Wittek
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Inselstr 22, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Child Lang 29:567-89. 2002
    ....
  24. doi request reprint Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind? 30 years later
    Josep Call
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Trends Cogn Sci 12:187-92. 2008
    ..Our conclusion for the moment is, thus, that chimpanzees understand others in terms of a perception-goal psychology, as opposed to a full-fledged, human-like belief-desire psychology...
  25. pmc Chimpanzees know that others make inferences
    Martin Schmelz
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:3077-9. 2011
    ..Chimpanzees can determine the inferences that a conspecific is likely to make and then adjust their competitive strategies accordingly...
  26. doi request reprint Are apes inequity averse? New data on the token-exchange paradigm
    Juliane Bräuer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 71:175-81. 2009
    ..Thus, with an improved methodology we failed to reproduce the findings of Brosnan et al. [Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences 272:253-258, 2005] that apes show inequity aversion...
  27. doi request reprint An experimental study of nettle feeding in captive gorillas
    Claudio Tennie
    Department of Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 70:584-93. 2008
    ..e. single actions) of this complex skill may be owing to social learning, at the program level gorilla nettle feeding derives mostly from genetic predispositions and individual learning of plant affordances...
  28. ncbi request reprint Infants' visual and auditory communication when a partner is or is not visually attending
    Ulf Liszkowski
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Infant Behav Dev 31:157-67. 2008
    ..However, there was little evidence that infants used their vocalizations to direct attention to their gestures when the recipient was not attending to them...
  29. ncbi request reprint Fourteen-month-olds know what others experience only in joint engagement
    Henrike Moll
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 10:826-35. 2007
    ..In combination with other studies, these results suggest that to know what others have experienced 14-month-old infants must do more than just perceive others perceiving something; they must engage with them actively in joint engagement...
  30. doi request reprint Do great apes use emotional expressions to infer desires?
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 12:688-98. 2009
    ..These findings suggest that great apes understand both the directedness and the valence of some human emotional expressions, and can use this understanding to infer desires...
  31. ncbi request reprint Humans have evolved specialized skills of social cognition: the cultural intelligence hypothesis
    Esther Herrmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, D 04103, Germany
    Science 317:1360-6. 2007
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Two-year-olds use primary sentence accent to learn new words
    Susanne Grassmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Child Lang 34:677-87. 2007
    ..They did not learn the nonce verb in any condition. These results suggest that from early in linguistic development, young children understand that prosodic salience in a sentence indicates referential newness...
  33. pmc Helping and cooperation in children with autism
    Kristin Liebal
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:224-38. 2008
    ..These results are discussed in terms of the prerequisite cognitive and motivational skills and propensities underlying social behavior...
  34. doi request reprint Rational tool use and tool choice in human infants and great apes
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 79:609-26. 2008
    ..Only some apes thus show an understanding of others' intentions as rational choices of action plans...
  35. doi request reprint Young children selectively avoid helping people with harmful intentions
    Amrisha Vaish
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 81:1661-9. 2010
    ..Children's prosocial behavior was thus mediated by the intentions behind the actor's moral behavior, irrespective of outcome. Children thus selectively avoid helping those who cause--or even intend to cause--others harm...
  36. pmc Ratcheting up the ratchet: on the evolution of cumulative culture
    Claudio Tennie
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:2405-15. 2009
    ..Together, these unique processes of social learning and cooperation lead to humans' unique form of cumulative cultural evolution...
  37. doi request reprint Domestic dogs comprehend human communication with iconic signs
    Juliane Kaminski
    Sub Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Madingley, Cambridge, UK
    Dev Sci 12:831-7. 2009
    ....
  38. doi request reprint Two-year-olds exclude novel objects as potential referents of novel words based on pragmatics
    Susanne Grassmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 112:488-93. 2009
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Young children understand multiple pretend identities in their object play
    Emily Wyman
    Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig D 04103, Germany
    Br J Dev Psychol 27:385-404. 2009
    ..Thus, using an inferential action methodology, these studies provide early and particularly convincing evidence that children can track the multiple pretend identities of objects...
  40. doi request reprint Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 112:337-42. 2009
    ..Results for 16-month-olds were in the same direction but less clear. These results represent by far the youngest age of false belief understanding in a task with an active behavioral measure...
  41. doi request reprint Sympathy through affective perspective taking and its relation to prosocial behavior in toddlers
    Amrisha Vaish
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 45:534-43. 2009
    ..Very young children can sympathize with a victim even in the absence of overt emotional signals, possibly by some form of affective perspective taking...
  42. doi request reprint Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures
    Kristin Liebal
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 12:264-71. 2009
    ..Infants just beginning to learn language thus already show a complex understanding of the pragmatics of cooperative communication in which shared experience with particular individuals plays a crucial role...
  43. doi request reprint The roots of human altruism
    Felix Warneken
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Br J Psychol 100:455-71. 2009
    ....
  44. doi request reprint The structure of individual differences in the cognitive abilities of children and chimpanzees
    Esther Herrmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Psychol Sci 21:102-10. 2010
    ....
  45. pmc Differences in the cognitive skills of bonobos and chimpanzees
    Esther Herrmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    PLoS ONE 5:e12438. 2010
    ..These species differences support the role of ecological and socio-ecological pressures in shaping cognitive skills over relatively short periods of evolutionary time...
  46. doi request reprint Extrinsic rewards undermine altruistic tendencies in 20-month-olds
    Felix Warneken
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 44:1785-8. 2008
    ..This so-called overjustification effect suggests that even the earliest helping behaviors of young children are intrinsically motivated and that socialization practices involving extrinsic rewards can undermine this tendency...
  47. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees are rational maximizers in an ultimatum game
    Keith Jensen
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Science 318:107-9. 2007
    ..These results support the hypothesis that other-regarding preferences and aversion to inequitable outcomes, which play key roles in human social organization, distinguish us from our closest living relatives...
  48. pmc Spontaneous altruism by chimpanzees and young children
    Felix Warneken
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    PLoS Biol 5:e184. 2007
    ..These results indicate that chimpanzees share crucial aspects of altruism with humans, suggesting that the roots of human altruism may go deeper than previous experimental evidence suggested...
  49. ncbi request reprint Understanding "prior intentions" enables two-year-olds to imitatively learn a complex task
    Malinda Carpenter
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 73:1431-41. 2002
    ..Children opened the box themselves more often in each of these three conditions than in the two No Prior Intention conditions, even though children in all five conditions saw the exact same demonstration of how to open the box...
  50. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) conceal visual and auditory information from others
    Alicia P Melis
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Comp Psychol 120:154-62. 2006
    ..These results suggest that chimpanzees can, in some circumstances, actively manipulate the visual and auditory perception of others by concealing information from them...
  51. ncbi request reprint Cooperative activities in young children and chimpanzees
    Felix Warneken
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 77:640-63. 2006
    ..These results are interpreted as evidence for a uniquely human form of cooperative activity involving shared intentionality that emerges in the second year of life...
  52. pmc What's in it for me? Self-regard precludes altruism and spite in chimpanzees
    Keith Jensen
    The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 273:1013-21. 2006
    ..The main result across all studies was that chimpanzees made their choices based solely on personal gain, with no regard for the outcomes of a conspecific. These results raise questions about the origins of human cooperative behaviour...
  53. ncbi request reprint Making inferences about the location of hidden food: social dog, causal ape
    Juliane Bräuer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Comp Psychol 120:38-47. 2006
    ..This result is discussed in terms of apes' adaptations for complex, extractive foraging and dogs' adaptations, during the domestication process, for cooperative communication with humans...
  54. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees recruit the best collaborators
    Alicia P Melis
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, D 04103, Germany
    Science 311:1297-300. 2006
    ....
  55. ncbi request reprint All great ape species follow gaze to distant locations and around barriers
    Juliane Bräuer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Comp Psychol 119:145-54. 2005
    ..These results support the hypothesis that great apes do not just orient to a target that another is oriented to, but they actually attempt to take the visual perspective of the other...
  56. ncbi request reprint Unwilling versus unable: infants' understanding of intentional action
    Tanya Behne
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 41:328-37. 2005
    ....
  57. ncbi request reprint Twelve-month-olds point to share attention and interest
    Ulf Liszkowski
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 7:297-307. 2004
    ..Results suggest that 12-month-olds point declaratively and understand that others have psychological states that can be directed and shared...
  58. ncbi request reprint 'Unwilling' versus 'unable': chimpanzees' understanding of human intentional action
    Josep Call
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 7:488-98. 2004
    ..experimenter These data together with other recent studies on chimpanzees' knowledge about others' visual perception show that chimpanzees know more about the intentional actions and perceptions of others than previously demonstrated..
  59. ncbi request reprint Social communication in siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus): use of gestures and facial expressions
    Katja Liebal
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Primates 45:41-57. 2004
    ..These observations are discussed in the context of siamang ecology, social structure, and cognition...
  60. ncbi request reprint Gestural communication in young gorillas (Gorilla gorilla): gestural repertoire, learning, and use
    Simone Pika
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 60:95-111. 2003
    ..The possibility of assigning Seyfarth and Cheney's [1997] model for nonhuman primate vocal development to the development of nonhuman primate gestural communication is discussed...
  61. ncbi request reprint Apes' and children's understanding of cooperative and competitive motives in a communicative situation
    Esther Herrmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 9:518-29. 2006
    ..Success in the Informing condition requires subjects to understand a cooperative communicative motive - which apparently apes and young infants find difficult...
  62. pmc Are apes really inequity averse?
    Juliane Bräuer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 273:3123-8. 2006
    ..The most plausible explanation for these results is the food expectation hypothesis - seeing another individual receive high-quality food creates the expectation of receiving the same food oneself - and not inequity aversion...
  63. ncbi request reprint Two-year-olds grasp the intentional structure of pretense acts
    Hannes Rakoczy
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 9:557-64. 2006
    ..These findings are discussed in the light of recent debates about children's developing understanding of pretense and theory of mind...
  64. pmc Chimpanzees do not take into account what others can hear in a competitive situation
    Juliane Bräuer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 11:175-8. 2008
    ..Results suggested that the chimpanzees did not take what the competitor had heard into account, despite being able to locate the hiding place themselves by the noise...
  65. ncbi request reprint Reference and attitude in infant pointing
    Ulf Liszkowski
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Child Lang 34:1-20. 2007
    ..These results suggest that by twelve months of age infant declarative pointing is a full communicative act aimed at sharing with others both attention to a referent and a specific attitude about that referent...
  66. ncbi request reprint Enculturated chimpanzees imitate rationally
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 10:F31-8. 2007
    ..Enculturated chimpanzees thus have some understanding of the rationality of others' intentional actions, and use this understanding when imitating others...
  67. ncbi request reprint Behavioral cues that great apes use to forage for hidden food
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 11:117-28. 2008
    ..Thus, great apes were able to use a variety of experimenter-given cues associated with foraging actions to locate hidden food and thereby were partially sensitive to the general purpose underlying these actions...
  68. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees really know what others can see in a competitive situation
    Juliane Bräuer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 10:439-48. 2007
    ..Differences in spatial arrangement may therefore account for the conflicting results of past studies...
  69. ncbi request reprint Gestural communication in subadult bonobos (Pan paniscus): repertoire and use
    Simone Pika
    Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
    Am J Primatol 65:39-61. 2005
    ..Differences from and similarities to the other African ape species are discussed...
  70. ncbi request reprint The development of the ability to recognize the meaning of iconic signs
    Tammy D Tolar
    Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 3979, USA
    J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ 13:225-40. 2008
    ..Implications of these findings for sign language development, receptive signed vocabulary tests, and the development of the ability to interpret iconic symbols are discussed...
  71. ncbi request reprint Copying results and copying actions in the process of social learning: chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and human children (Homo sapiens)
    Josep Call
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 8:151-63. 2005
    ....
  72. ncbi request reprint 12- and 18-month-old infants follow gaze to spaces behind barriers
    Henrike Moll
    Department of Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 7:F1-9. 2004
    ..They also add to growing evidence that 12-month-olds have some understanding of the looking behaviors of others as an act of seeing...
  73. ncbi request reprint Young children know that trying is not pretending: a test of the "behaving-as-if" construal of children's early concept of pretense
    Hannes Rakoczy
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 40:388-99. 2004
    ..The findings of the 3 studies demonstrate that by 2 to 3 years of age, children have a concept of pretense as a specific type of intentional activity...
  74. ncbi request reprint Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) are sensitive to the attentional state of humans
    Josep Call
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    J Comp Psychol 117:257-63. 2003
    ..Results are discussed in terms of domestic dogs' social-cognitive skills and their unique evolutionary and ontogenetic histories...
  75. ncbi request reprint The domestication of social cognition in dogs
    Brian Hare
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Science 298:1634-6. 2002
    ..These findings suggest that during the process of domestication, dogs have been selected for a set of social-cognitive abilities that enable them to communicate with humans in unique ways...
  76. doi request reprint The sources of normativity: young children's awareness of the normative structure of games
    Hannes Rakoczy
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Psychol 44:875-81. 2008
    ..These studies demonstrate in a particularly strong way that even very young children have some grasp of the normative structure of conventional activities...
  77. ncbi request reprint A dense corpus study of past tense and plural overregularization in English
    Robert J C Maslen
    Max Planck Child Study Centre, Department of Psychology, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
    J Speech Lang Hear Res 47:1319-33. 2004
    ..The implications of these findings for blocking and other accounts of OR are discussed...
  78. doi request reprint Twelve-month-olds communicate helpfully and appropriately for knowledgeable and ignorant partners
    Ulf Liszkowski
    Communication Before Language Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Wundtlaan 1, 6525 XD Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Cognition 108:732-9. 2008
    ....
  79. doi request reprint The acquisition of German relative clauses: a case study
    Silke Brandt
    Max Planck Institut für evolutionaere Anthropologie, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Child Lang 35:325-48. 2008
    ..We argue that German relative clauses develop in an incremental fashion from simple non-embedded sentences that gradually evolve into complex sentence constructions...
  80. ncbi request reprint Pointing out new news, old news, and absent referents at 12 months of age
    Ulf Liszkowski
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 10:F1-7. 2007
    ..These findings provide strong support for a mentalistic and prosocial interpretation of infants' prelinguistic communication...
  81. pmc Cooperation and human cognition: the Vygotskian intelligence hypothesis
    Henrike Moll
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:639-48. 2007
    ..We argue, finally, that regular participation in cooperative, cultural interactions during ontogeny leads children to construct uniquely powerful forms of perspectival cognitive representation...
  82. ncbi request reprint Altruistic helping in human infants and young chimpanzees
    Felix Warneken
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Science 311:1301-3. 2006
    ..This requires both an understanding of others' goals and an altruistic motivation to help. In addition, we demonstrate similar though less robust skills and motivations in three young chimpanzees...
  83. ncbi request reprint How toddlers and preschoolers learn to uniquely identify referents for others: a training study
    Danielle Matthews
    Max Planck Child Study Centre, School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
    Child Dev 78:1744-59. 2007
    ..Four-year-olds additionally demonstrated learning effects in a transfer task. These results suggest that young children's communication skills develop best in response to feedback about their own attempts at reference...
  84. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees deceive a human competitor by hiding
    Brian Hare
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cognition 101:495-514. 2006
    ....
  85. ncbi request reprint One-year-olds comprehend the communicative intentions behind gestures in a hiding game
    Tanya Behne
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 8:492-9. 2005
    ..Children at all three ages successfully used both types of cues. We conclude that infants as young as 14 months of age can, in some situations, interpret an adult behaviour as a relevant communicative act done for them...
  86. ncbi request reprint Human-like social skills in dogs?
    Brian Hare
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Trends Cogn Sci 9:439-44. 2005
    ..The study of convergent evolution provides an exciting opportunity to gain further insights into the evolutionary processes leading to human-like forms of cooperation and communication...
  87. pmc Chimpanzees are vengeful but not spiteful
    Keith Jensen
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:13046-50. 2007
    ..Like humans, chimpanzees retaliate against personally harmful actions, but unlike humans, they are indifferent to simply personally disadvantageous outcomes and are therefore not spiteful...