Katrin Knittel

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Anaerobic oxidation of methane: progress with an unknown process
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:311-34. 2009
  2. pmc Diversity and distribution of methanotrophic archaea at cold seeps
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Molecular Ecology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:467-79. 2005
  3. pmc Diversity and abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:3348-62. 2007
  4. doi request reprint Endosymbioses between bacteria and deep-sea siboglinid tubeworms from an Arctic Cold Seep (Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea)
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 10:3237-54. 2008
  5. pmc Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia
    Thomas Holler
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 5:1946-56. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink
    Helge Niemann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Nature 443:854-8. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Insights into the genomes of archaea mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane
    Anke Meyerdierks
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 7:1937-51. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Microbial community structure of sandy intertidal sediments in the North Sea, Sylt-Rømø Basin, Wadden Sea
    Niculina Musat
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Syst Appl Microbiol 29:333-48. 2006
  9. pmc Archaea of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group are abundant, diverse and widespread in marine sediments
    Kyoko Kubo
    Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 6:1949-65. 2012
  10. ncbi request reprint Origins and evolutionary flexibility of chemosynthetic symbionts from deep-sea animals
    Jillian M Petersen
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Biol Bull 223:123-37. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. doi request reprint Anaerobic oxidation of methane: progress with an unknown process
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:311-34. 2009
    ..This review summarizes what is known and unknown about AOM on earth and its key catalysts, the ANME clades and their bacterial partners...
  2. pmc Diversity and distribution of methanotrophic archaea at cold seeps
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Molecular Ecology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:467-79. 2005
    ..These variations in the distribution, diversity, and morphology of methanotrophic consortia are discussed with respect to the presence of microbial ecotypes, niche formation, and biogeography...
  3. pmc Diversity and abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:3348-62. 2007
    ..Our results further support the hypothesis of Niemann et al. (54), that high methane availability and different fluid flow regimens at the HMMV provide distinct niches for aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs...
  4. doi request reprint Endosymbioses between bacteria and deep-sea siboglinid tubeworms from an Arctic Cold Seep (Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea)
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 10:3237-54. 2008
    ..In O. haakonmosbiensis, stable carbon isotope values of fatty acids and cholesterol of -70 per thousand are difficult to reconcile with our current knowledge of isotope signatures for chemoautotrophic processes...
  5. pmc Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia
    Thomas Holler
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 5:1946-56. 2011
    ..Hippea maritima) are moderately thermophilic sulfur reducers. Results indicate that AOM and ANME archaea could be of biogeochemical relevance not only in cold to moderate but also in hot marine habitats...
  6. ncbi request reprint Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink
    Helge Niemann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Nature 443:854-8. 2006
    ..This mechanism limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux...
  7. ncbi request reprint Insights into the genomes of archaea mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane
    Anke Meyerdierks
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 7:1937-51. 2005
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Microbial community structure of sandy intertidal sediments in the North Sea, Sylt-Rømø Basin, Wadden Sea
    Niculina Musat
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Syst Appl Microbiol 29:333-48. 2006
    ..2005)...
  9. pmc Archaea of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group are abundant, diverse and widespread in marine sediments
    Kyoko Kubo
    Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 6:1949-65. 2012
    ..This high diversity and widespread distribution in subsurface sediments indicates that this group is globally important in sedimentary processes...
  10. ncbi request reprint Origins and evolutionary flexibility of chemosynthetic symbionts from deep-sea animals
    Jillian M Petersen
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Biol Bull 223:123-37. 2012
    ..The host range within the bathymodiolin symbionts is therefore greater than previously recognized, confirming the remarkable flexibility of these symbiotic associations...
  11. pmc Consumption of methane and CO2 by methanotrophic microbial mats from gas seeps of the anoxic Black Sea
    Tina Treude
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Biogeochemistry, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany corrected
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:2271-83. 2007
    ..However, since considerable methane formation was observed only in the presence of methane and sulfate, the process appeared to be a rereaction of anaerobic oxidation of methane rather than net methanogenesis...
  12. doi request reprint Sulfur-metabolizing bacterial populations in microbial mats of the Nakabusa hot spring, Japan
    Kyoko Kubo
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    Syst Appl Microbiol 34:293-302. 2011
    ..act as highly efficient scavengers of oxygen from the spring water, thus creating a favorable, anoxic environment for Chloroflexus and Thermodesulfobacterium/Thermodesulfatator in deeper layers...
  13. doi request reprint Identification of the dominant sulfate-reducing bacterial partner of anaerobic methanotrophs of the ANME-2 clade
    Lars Schreiber
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 12:2327-40. 2010
    ..SEEP-SRB1a contributed to only 0.3% to 0.7% of all single cells in almost all samples indicating that these bacteria are highly adapted to a symbiotic relationship with ANME-2...
  14. doi request reprint A novel, mat-forming Thiomargarita population associated with a sulfidic fluid flow from a deep-sea mud volcano
    Anne Christin Girnth
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 13:495-505. 2011
    ....
  15. doi request reprint Distribution and in situ abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in diverse marine hydrocarbon seep sediments
    Sara Kleindienst
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 14:2689-710. 2012
    ..Two other uncultured groups, SEEP-SRB3 and SEEP-SRB4, were preferentially detected in surface sediments from mud volcanoes...
  16. ncbi request reprint Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain hydrocarbons by marine sulphate-reducing bacteria
    Olaf Kniemeyer
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Nature 449:898-901. 2007
    ..Our results suggest that diverse SRB are able to thrive in seep areas and gas reservoirs on propane and butane, thus altering the gas composition and contributing to sulphide production...
  17. pmc Subsurface microbial methanotrophic mats in the Black Sea
    Tina Treude
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:6375-8. 2005
    ..This mat was dominated by ANME-1 archaea and consumed methane and sulfate simultaneously. We propose that such subsurface mats represent the initial stage of previously investigated microbial reefs...
  18. ncbi request reprint Thiomicrospira arctica sp. nov. and Thiomicrospira psychrophila sp. nov., psychrophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from marine Arctic sediments
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 55:781-6. 2005
    ..The names Thiomicrospira arctica sp. nov. and Thiomicrospira psychrophila sp. nov. are proposed for SVAL-E(T) (=ATCC 700955(T)=DSM 13458(T)) and SVAL-D(T) (=ATCC 700954(T)=DSM 13453(T)), respectively...
  19. doi request reprint Development of a 16S rRNA-targeted probe set for Verrucomicrobia and its application for fluorescence in situ hybridization in a humic lake
    Julia Arnds
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Molecular Ecology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Syst Appl Microbiol 33:139-48. 2010
    ..were omnipresent in low numbers (<1%). Verrucomicrobial abundance and community composition varied between the seasons, and between more and less humic basins, but were rather stable in oxic and seasonally anoxic waters...
  20. doi request reprint Substantial (13) C/(12) C and D/H fractionation during anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine consortia enriched in vitro
    Thomas Holler
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstraße 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, 27515 Bremerhaven, Germany
    Environ Microbiol Rep 1:370-6. 2009
    ....
  21. pmc SILVA: a comprehensive online resource for quality checked and aligned ribosomal RNA sequence data compatible with ARB
    Elmar Pruesse
    Microbial Genomics Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
    Nucleic Acids Res 35:7188-96. 2007
    ..The latest publicly available database release 91 (August 2007) hosts 547 521 sequences split into 461 823 small subunit and 85 689 large subunit rRNAs...
  22. pmc Diversity and structure of bacterial communities in Arctic versus Antarctic pack ice
    Robin Brinkmeyer
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 69:6610-9. 2003
    ..A terrestrial influence on the arctic pack ice community was suggested by the presence of limnic phylotypes...
  23. ncbi request reprint Microbial reefs in the Black Sea fueled by anaerobic oxidation of methane
    Walter Michaelis
    Institute of Biogeochemistry and Marine Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
    Science 297:1013-5. 2002
    ..Obviously, anaerobic microbial consortia can generate both carbonate precipitation and substantial biomass accumulation, which has implications for our understanding of carbon cycling during earlier periods of Earth's history...