Bart Kempenaers

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. pmc Sources of individual variation in plasma testosterone levels
    Bart Kempenaers
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, 82305 Seewiesen, Germany
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1711-23. 2008
  2. pmc When the sun never sets: diverse activity rhythms under continuous daylight in free-living arctic-breeding birds
    Silke S Steiger
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20131016. 2013
  3. pmc Drd4 gene polymorphisms are associated with personality variation in a passerine bird
    Andrew E Fidler
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, 82319 Starnberg, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1685-91. 2007
  4. pmc Search for informative polymorphisms in candidate genes: clock genes and circadian behaviour in blue tits
    C Steinmeyer
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology Seewiesen, Postfach 1564, 82305 Starnberg, Seewiesen, Germany
    Genetica 136:109-17. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint A quantitative genetic approach to understanding aggressive behavior
    Bart Kempenaers
    Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Behav Brain Sci 32:282-3; discussion 292-311. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Behavioural ecology: cuckolder eggs come first
    Bart Kempenaers
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, E Gwinnerstr, 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Curr Biol 19:R364-6. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Artificial night lighting affects dawn song, extra-pair siring success, and lay date in songbirds
    Bart Kempenaers
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Curr Biol 20:1735-9. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Haplotype structure, adaptive history and associations with exploratory behaviour of the DRD4 gene region in four great tit (Parus major) populations
    Jakob C Mueller
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 22:2797-809. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Heterozygosity and survival in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus): contrasting effects of presumably functional and neutral loci
    Juanita Olano-Marin
    Department of Behavioral Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, D 82319 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 20:4028-41. 2011
  10. doi request reprint Correlations between heterozygosity and reproductive success in the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus): an analysis of inbreeding and single locus effects
    Juanita Olano-Marin
    Department of Behavioral Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Evolution 65:3175-94. 2011

Detail Information

Publications46

  1. pmc Sources of individual variation in plasma testosterone levels
    Bart Kempenaers
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, 82305 Seewiesen, Germany
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1711-23. 2008
    ..We suggest that studies that use an integrative approach and investigate the relative importance of all potential sources of variation are essential for the interpretation of data on individual plasma T levels...
  2. pmc When the sun never sets: diverse activity rhythms under continuous daylight in free-living arctic-breeding birds
    Silke S Steiger
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20131016. 2013
    ..Our results support the idea that circadian behaviour can be adaptively modified to enable species-specific time-keeping under polar conditions...
  3. pmc Drd4 gene polymorphisms are associated with personality variation in a passerine bird
    Andrew E Fidler
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, 82319 Starnberg, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1685-91. 2007
    ....
  4. pmc Search for informative polymorphisms in candidate genes: clock genes and circadian behaviour in blue tits
    C Steinmeyer
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology Seewiesen, Postfach 1564, 82305 Starnberg, Seewiesen, Germany
    Genetica 136:109-17. 2009
    ..Both strategies showed high success rates with respect to finding homologous gene regions and potentially informative genetic variants in the genes AANAT, ADCYAP1, CKIepsilon, CLOCK, CREB1, NPAS2 and PERIOD2...
  5. ncbi request reprint A quantitative genetic approach to understanding aggressive behavior
    Bart Kempenaers
    Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Behav Brain Sci 32:282-3; discussion 292-311. 2009
    ..As to its heritable component, future studies on the genetic architecture of aggressive behavior across different contexts could shed more light on the evolutionary origins of male-female versus male-male aggression...
  6. doi request reprint Behavioural ecology: cuckolder eggs come first
    Bart Kempenaers
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, E Gwinnerstr, 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Curr Biol 19:R364-6. 2009
    ..This has been interpreted as evidence for genetic benefits of female promiscuity, but a new study shows that the difference in fitness may be largely due to a non-genetic, maternal effect...
  7. doi request reprint Artificial night lighting affects dawn song, extra-pair siring success, and lay date in songbirds
    Bart Kempenaers
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Curr Biol 20:1735-9. 2010
    ..It may have important evolutionary consequences by changing the information embedded in previously reliable quality-indicator traits...
  8. doi request reprint Haplotype structure, adaptive history and associations with exploratory behaviour of the DRD4 gene region in four great tit (Parus major) populations
    Jakob C Mueller
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 22:2797-809. 2013
    ..We therefore hypothesize that variation in exploratory and other dopamine-related behaviour evolves locally by occasional adaptive shifts in the frequency of underlying genetic variants...
  9. doi request reprint Heterozygosity and survival in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus): contrasting effects of presumably functional and neutral loci
    Juanita Olano-Marin
    Department of Behavioral Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, D 82319 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 20:4028-41. 2011
    ..Our results highlight the importance of considering the characteristics of the markers used in HFC studies and confirm the mixed effects of heterozygosity in different contexts (e.g. sex and life-history stage)...
  10. doi request reprint Correlations between heterozygosity and reproductive success in the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus): an analysis of inbreeding and single locus effects
    Juanita Olano-Marin
    Department of Behavioral Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Evolution 65:3175-94. 2011
    ..Thus, the HFC found here cannot be attributed to strong effects of the loci under study...
  11. pmc A comparison of reptilian and avian olfactory receptor gene repertoires: species-specific expansion of group gamma genes in birds
    Silke S Steiger
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    BMC Genomics 10:446. 2009
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Association between DRD4 gene polymorphism and personality variation in great tits: a test across four wild populations
    Peter Korsten
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 19:832-43. 2010
    ..Another important future challenge is the identification of additional loci influencing avian personality traits in the wild...
  13. doi request reprint Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in zebra finches: microsatellite markers can be better than their reputation
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str 8, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 21:3237-49. 2012
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Evidence for adaptive evolution of olfactory receptor genes in 9 bird species
    Silke S Steiger
    Department of Behavioral Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, 82305 Starnberg
    J Hered 101:325-33. 2010
    ....
  15. pmc Avian olfactory receptor gene repertoires: evidence for a well-developed sense of smell in birds?
    Silke S Steiger
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, 82319 Starnberg, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2309-17. 2008
    ..In summary, our findings suggest that olfaction in birds may be a more important sense than generally believed...
  16. doi request reprint Individual variation in sleep-wake rhythms in free-living birds
    Jakob C Mueller
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg, Germany
    Chronobiol Int 29:1216-26. 2012
    ..Blue tits showed longer sleep-wake rhythms when the nights were longer. These observations suggest a genetic basis for the incidence of rhythmic sleep-wake behavior in addition to environmental modifications of their specific expression...
  17. pmc Experimental evidence for adaptive personalities in a wild passerine bird
    Marion Nicolaus
    Evolutionary Ecology of Variation Group, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 279:4885-92. 2012
    ....
  18. doi request reprint QTL and quantitative genetic analysis of beak morphology reveals patterns of standing genetic variation in an Estrildid finch
    Ulrich Knief
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 21:3704-17. 2012
    ..Five QTL do not cover known candidates demonstrating that yet unknown genes or regulatory elements may influence beak morphology in the zebra finch...
  19. doi request reprint Optical properties of the uropygial gland secretion: no evidence for UV cosmetics in birds
    Kaspar Delhey
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Vogelwarte Radolfzell, Schlossallee 2, 78315 Radolfzell, Germany
    Naturwissenschaften 95:939-46. 2008
    ..However, the optical properties of the uropygial secretion may have been selected to interfere as little as possible with visual signaling through plumage reflectance...
  20. ncbi request reprint Females increase offspring heterozygosity and fitness through extra-pair matings
    Katharina Foerster
    Max Planck Research Centre for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Nature 425:714-7. 2003
    ..The cost of inbreeding may therefore be an important factor driving the evolution of female extra-pair mating...
  21. doi request reprint Detection of olfactory receptor transcripts in bird testes
    Silke S Steiger
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, PO Box 1564, 82319 Starnberg, Germany
    J Hered 99:624-8. 2008
    ..Moreover, we show that they belong to the class-gamma OR gene clade. We discuss the potential significance and evolutionary implications of avian testicular OR gene expression...
  22. pmc Evidence for increased olfactory receptor gene repertoire size in two nocturnal bird species with well-developed olfactory ability
    Silke S Steiger
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    BMC Evol Biol 9:117. 2009
    ..Therefore, we hypothesized that nocturnal birds with good olfactory abilities have evolved (i) more OR genes and (ii) more intact OR genes than closely related and presumably less 'olfaction-dependent' day-active avian taxa...
  23. pmc A polymorphism in the oestrogen receptor gene explains covariance between digit ratio and mating behaviour
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3353-61. 2010
    ..Finally, we note that the commonly invoked effect of foetal testosterone on human digit ratio seems to be substantially weaker than the effect described here...
  24. doi request reprint Individual variation in plasma testosterone levels and its relation to badge size in House Sparrows Passer domesticus: it's a night-and-day difference
    Silke Laucht
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Straße, Haus 7 8, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 170:501-8. 2011
    ..Our study highlights that integrative research on the endocrine control of ornament expression needs to take diel variation in hormone levels into account...
  25. ncbi request reprint Plasma steroid hormones in two Arctic-breeding shorebirds: monogamy versus polygyny
    Silke S Steiger
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, 82305 Starnberg, Seewiesen, Germany
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 147:133-40. 2006
    ..Our study also supports previous studies suggesting that the short breeding season in the high Arctic and the importance of male care to nest success may be factors leading to behavioral T insensitivity...
  26. doi request reprint Cosmetic coloration in birds: occurrence, function, and evolution
    Kaspar Delhey
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, D 82305 Seewiesen, Germany
    Am Nat 169:S145-58. 2007
    ..However, more information is required on function, mechanisms, and costs to understand the evolution of cosmetic coloration and to confirm its signaling role...
  27. doi request reprint Biogenic Trace Amine-Associated Receptors (TAARS) are encoded in avian genomes: evidence and possible implications
    Jakob C Mueller
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, 82305 Starnberg, Germany
    J Hered 99:174-6. 2008
    ..We tentatively suggest that avian TAARs may compensate for the lack of an avian equivalent of the mammalian vomeronasal system and therefore may be important mediators of socially important avian chemical cues...
  28. pmc Rock sparrow song reflects male age and reproductive success
    Erwin Nemeth
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Communication and Social Behaviour Group, Seewiesen, Germany
    PLoS ONE 7:e43259. 2012
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Adaptive sleep loss in polygynous pectoral sandpipers
    John A Lesku
    Avian Sleep Group, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Science 337:1654-8. 2012
    ..Males that slept the least sired the most offspring. Our results challenge the view that decreased performance is an inescapable outcome of sleep loss...
  30. pmc Identification of a gene associated with avian migratory behaviour
    Jakob C Mueller
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 82319 Starnberg, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 278:2848-56. 2011
    ..Moreover, the multiple described functions of the gene product indicate that this gene might act at multiple levels modifying the shift between migratory and non-migratory states...
  31. ncbi request reprint Genetic variation and differentiation in captive and wild zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 16:4039-50. 2007
    ..By providing a tree of the genetic similarity of the different captive populations, we hope to contribute to a better understanding of variation in research findings obtained by different laboratories...
  32. ncbi request reprint Trade-offs between immune investment and sexual signaling in male mallards
    Anne Peters
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Reproductive Biology and Behaviour Group, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Am Nat 164:51-9. 2004
    ..Because males with high testosterone are preferred by females, the decline in testosterone, in addition to carotenoid depletion and effects on bill reflectance, could constitute a significant cost of immune investment...
  33. doi request reprint Age-specific effect of heterozygosity on survival in alpine marmots, Marmota marmota
    Aurélie Cohas
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 18:1491-503. 2009
    ..Thus, the genome-wide heterozygosity effect seems to explain the observed heterozygosity-fitness correlation in the alpine marmot...
  34. doi request reprint Effects of social and extra-pair mating on sexual selection in blue tits (cyanistes caeruleus)
    Emmi Schlicht
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Straße, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Evolution 67:1420-34. 2013
    ..Under the assumption that the unknown sires are nonbreeding males, EPP reduced the variance in and the strength of selection on mating success, a possibility that hitherto has not been considered...
  35. pmc Sexual selection in a lekking bird: the relative opportunity for selection by female choice and male competition
    Emily H DuVal
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Haus No 5, Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 275:1995-2003. 2008
    ..Thus, both intrasexual competition for status and female mate choice among lekking alpha males contribute substantially to the potential for sexual selection in this species...
  36. doi request reprint QTL linkage mapping of wing length in zebra finch using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms markers
    Holger Schielzeth
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, Norbyvagen 18D, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
    Mol Ecol 21:329-39. 2012
    ..Our findings therefore suggest that standing genetic variation in the Wnt genes might be linked to avian wing morphology, although there are many other genes that also fall within the confidence regions...
  37. pmc Is spatial autocorrelation an intrinsic property of territory size?
    Mihai Valcu
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Oecologia 162:609-15. 2010
    ..Hence, we recommend that appropriate statistical methods should be employed for the analysis of data sets where territory size is either a dependent or an explanatory variable...
  38. pmc Female extrapair mating behavior can evolve via indirect selection on males
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, The Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:10608-13. 2011
    ..This behavior leads to a fundamentally different view of female extrapair mating: it may exist even if females obtain no net benefit from it, simply because the corresponding alleles were positively selected in the male ancestors...
  39. doi request reprint A genome-wide set of 106 microsatellite markers for the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)
    Juanita Olano-Marin
    Department of Behavioral Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK Department of Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, SE 223 62 Lund, Sweden
    Mol Ecol Resour 10:516-32. 2010
    ....
  40. doi request reprint Disentangling the roles of frequency-vs. state-dependence in generating individual differences in behavioural plasticity
    Kimberley J Mathot
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner StraβEe 7, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Ecol Lett 14:1254-62. 2011
    ..However, negative-frequency dependence alone cannot explain why plasticity would be consistent within individuals, and future studies should address the factors that might favour individual consistency...
  41. doi request reprint Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus; Aves)
    Sylvia Kuhn
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5E2
    Mol Ecol Resour 9:845-8. 2009
    ..Seven markers showed evidence for the presence of null alleles, and three of those showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Markers were generally unlinked...
  42. pmc Paternity analysis reveals opposing selection pressures on crown coloration in the blue tit (Parus caeruleus)
    Kaspar Delhey
    Max Planck Research Centre for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, D 82305, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 270:2057-63. 2003
    ..Reduced intensity of sexual selection due to alternative mating tactics constitutes a potential mechanism maintaining additive genetic variance of male ornaments...
  43. pmc Plumage colour in nestling blue tits: sexual dichromatism, condition dependence and genetic effects
    Arild Johnsen
    Max Planck Research Centre for Ornithology, PO Box 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 270:1263-70. 2003
    ..Our study shows that nestling blue tits are suitable model organisms for the study of ontogenetic costs and heritability of both carotenoid-based and structural colour in birds...
  44. pmc Parental care and adaptive brood sex ratio manipulation in birds
    Dennis Hasselquist
    Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, 223 62, Sweden
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:363-72. 2002
    ....
  45. ncbi request reprint Molecular and phenotypic divergence in the bluethroat (Luscinia svecica) subspecies complex
    Arild Johnsen
    National Centre for Biosystematics, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, PO Box 1172 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway
    Mol Ecol 15:4033-47. 2006
    ....
  46. ncbi request reprint Genetic similarity between mates and extra-pair parentage in three species of shorebirds
    Donald Blomqvist
    Konrad Lorenz Institute for Comparative Ethology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Savoyenstrasse 1a, A 1160 Vienna, Austria
    Nature 419:613-5. 2002
    ..We propose that extra-pair parentage may represent adaptive behavioural strategies to avoid the negative effects of pairing with a genetically similar mate...