Gottfried Hohmann

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Evidence of leopard predation on bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Danielle E D'Amour
    Department of Natural Resources Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 01003, USA
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 77:212-7. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint New records on prey capture and meat eating by bonobos at Lui Kotale, Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo
    Gottfried Hohmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 79:103-10. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Plant foods consumed by Pan: exploring the variation of nutritional ecology across Africa
    Gottfried Hohmann
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:476-85. 2010
  4. doi request reprint The relationship between socio-sexual behavior and salivary cortisol in bonobos: tests of the tension regulation hypothesis
    Gottfried Hohmann
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 71:223-32. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Identification of energy consumption and nutritional stress by isotopic and elemental analysis of urine in bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Tobias Deschner
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 26:69-77. 2012
  6. doi request reprint The bonobo-dialium positive interactions: seed dispersal mutualism
    David Beaune
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 75:394-403. 2013
  7. pmc Measurements of salivary alpha amylase and salivary cortisol in hominoid primates reveal within-species consistency and between-species differences
    Verena Behringer
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    PLoS ONE 8:e60773. 2013
  8. pmc Co-Residence between Males and Their Mothers and Grandmothers Is More Frequent in Bonobos Than Chimpanzees
    Grit Schubert
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany Epidemiology of highly pathogenic microorganisms, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany
    PLoS ONE 8:e83870. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Social correlates of variation in urinary cortisol in wild male bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Martin Surbeck
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Leipzig, Germany
    Horm Behav 62:27-35. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Adrenarche in bonobos (Pan paniscus): evidence from ontogenetic changes in urinary dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate levels
    Verena Behringer
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Endocrinol 214:55-65. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi request reprint Evidence of leopard predation on bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Danielle E D'Amour
    Department of Natural Resources Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 01003, USA
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 77:212-7. 2006
    ..The following report provides the first evidence of predation by a leopard on bonobos (Pan paniscus)...
  2. ncbi request reprint New records on prey capture and meat eating by bonobos at Lui Kotale, Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo
    Gottfried Hohmann
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 79:103-10. 2008
    ..Results suggest that bonobos consume meat with frequencies similar to some chimpanzee populations. The data emphasize differences between the two Pan species in terms of prey species selection and prey capture...
  3. doi request reprint Plant foods consumed by Pan: exploring the variation of nutritional ecology across Africa
    Gottfried Hohmann
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:476-85. 2010
    ..This suggests that the nutritional quality of the habitat is not always a reliable predictor of the quality of the diet...
  4. doi request reprint The relationship between socio-sexual behavior and salivary cortisol in bonobos: tests of the tension regulation hypothesis
    Gottfried Hohmann
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 71:223-32. 2009
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Identification of energy consumption and nutritional stress by isotopic and elemental analysis of urine in bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Tobias Deschner
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 26:69-77. 2012
    ....
  6. doi request reprint The bonobo-dialium positive interactions: seed dispersal mutualism
    David Beaune
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 75:394-403. 2013
    ..This plant-animal interaction highlights positive effects between two major organisms of the Congo basin rainforest, and establishes the role of the bonobo as an efficient disperser of Dialium seeds. Periodicals, Inc...
  7. pmc Measurements of salivary alpha amylase and salivary cortisol in hominoid primates reveal within-species consistency and between-species differences
    Verena Behringer
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    PLoS ONE 8:e60773. 2013
    ..Studies on sAA activity have the potential to complement molecular studies and may contribute to research on feeding ecology and nutrition...
  8. pmc Co-Residence between Males and Their Mothers and Grandmothers Is More Frequent in Bonobos Than Chimpanzees
    Grit Schubert
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany Epidemiology of highly pathogenic microorganisms, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany
    PLoS ONE 8:e83870. 2013
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Social correlates of variation in urinary cortisol in wild male bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Martin Surbeck
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Leipzig, Germany
    Horm Behav 62:27-35. 2012
    ..The observed increase in male cortisol may be associated with spatial proximity to oestrous females and could result from anticipated aggression from other group members, reduced feeding time in the males, or a combination of both...
  10. doi request reprint Adrenarche in bonobos (Pan paniscus): evidence from ontogenetic changes in urinary dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate levels
    Verena Behringer
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Endocrinol 214:55-65. 2012
    ..If applicable to other species, the technique would facilitate more research on the evolutionary origin of adrenarche and other developmental processes...
  11. pmc Exploring the contribution and significance of animal protein in the diet of bonobos by stable isotope ratio analysis of hair
    Vicky M Oelze
    Department of Human Evolution and Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:9792-7. 2011
    ..Given the large variation in hunting and meat eating of Pan across the African continent, the detection of seasonal changes in faunivory by elevated δ(15)N values in sectioned ape hair is a promising approach...
  12. pmc Vertebrate DNA in fecal samples from bonobos and gorillas: evidence for meat consumption or artefact?
    Michael Hofreiter
    Research Group Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    PLoS ONE 5:e9419. 2010
    ..As a control we also attempted PCR amplifications from gorilla feces, a species assumed to be strictly herbivorous...
  13. doi request reprint Evidence for the consumption of arboreal, diurnal primates by bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Martin Surbeck
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 71:171-4. 2009
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Stress affects salivary alpha-Amylase activity in bonobos
    Verena Behringer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Leipzig, Germany
    Physiol Behav 105:476-82. 2012
    ..Monitoring sAA activity could therefore be a useful tool for evaluating stress in bonobos...
  15. doi request reprint Urinary C-peptide as a method for monitoring body mass changes in captive bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Tobias Deschner
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Leipzig, Germany
    Horm Behav 54:620-6. 2008
    ..Our results suggest that urinary C-peptide levels are an accurate indicator of individual energy balance. In conclusion, measuring C-peptide in urine is a promising method to quantify the energetic condition of wild apes...
  16. doi request reprint Age-related changes in Thyroid hormone levels of bonobos and chimpanzees indicate heterochrony in development
    Verena Behringer
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany Centre for Research and Conservation, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, K Astridplein 26, B 2018 Antwerp, Belgium Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 66:83-8. 2014
    ..Given that developmental studies are often based on post-mortem analyses of skeletons, measures of urinary thyroid hormones offer a non-invasive tool for exploring ontogenetic changes in living wild and captive hominoids. ..
  17. doi request reprint Cannibalism in wild bonobos (Pan paniscus) at Lui Kotale
    Andrew Fowler
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Primatol 72:509-14. 2010
    ..The incident suggests that filial cannibalism among apes need not be the result of nutritional or social stress and does not support the idea that filial cannibalism is a behavioral aberration...
  18. pmc Mothers matter! Maternal support, dominance status and mating success in male bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Martin Surbeck
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 278:590-8. 2011
    ..The absence of female support to unrelated males suggests that mothers gain indirect fitness benefits by supporting their sons...
  19. pmc Male-mediated gene flow in patrilocal primates
    Grit Schubert
    Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    PLoS ONE 6:e21514. 2011
    ..Still, male-mediated gene flow might occur through rare events such as extra-group matings leading to extra-group paternity (EGP) and female secondary dispersal with offspring, but the extent of this gene flow has not yet been assessed...
  20. ncbi request reprint Y-chromosome analysis confirms highly sex-biased dispersal and suggests a low male effective population size in bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    Jonas Eriksson
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Mol Ecol 15:939-49. 2006
    ..40,000-45,000). For humans the difference is merely a factor of two, suggesting a more stable demographic history in bonobos in comparison to humans...
  21. ncbi request reprint Urinary androgens and cortisol metabolites in field-sampled bonobos (Pan paniscus)
    John Dittami
    Department of Behavioural Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstr 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 155:552-7. 2008
    ..The CORT/T metabolite interactions in males may reflect male-specific social or metabolic endocrine conditions...
  22. doi request reprint The influence of natural diet composition, food intake level, and body size on ingesta passage in primates
    Marcus Clauss
    Clinic for Zoo Animals, Exotic Pets and Wildlife, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Switzerland
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 150:274-81. 2008
    ..Whereas simple-stomached (hindgut fermenting) species can be found along the whole continuum, foregut fermenters appear limited to the "efficiency" approach...
  23. ncbi request reprint Urinary testosterone levels of wild male bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Lomako Forest, Democratic Republic of Congo
    Andrew J Marshall
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Am J Primatol 65:87-92. 2005
    ....