Stephan W Grill

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. ncbi The distribution of active force generators controls mitotic spindle position
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, D 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Science 301:518-21. 2003
  2. pmc PAR proteins diffuse freely across the anterior-posterior boundary in polarized C. elegans embryos
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    J Cell Biol 193:583-94. 2011
  3. doi Growing up is stressful: biophysical laws of morphogenesis
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 21:647-52. 2011
  4. doi Polarization of PAR proteins by advective triggering of a pattern-forming system
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Science 334:1137-41. 2011
  5. ncbi Spindle oscillations during asymmetric cell division require a threshold number of active cortical force generators
    Jacques Pecreaux
    Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Curr Biol 16:2111-22. 2006
  6. pmc FRAP analysis of membrane-associated proteins: lateral diffusion and membrane-cytoplasmic exchange
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Biophys J 99:2443-52. 2010
  7. ncbi Spindle positioning by cortical pulling forces
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, D 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Dev Cell 8:461-5. 2005
  8. doi Anisotropies in cortical tension reveal the physical basis of polarizing cortical flows
    Mirjam Mayer
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Nature 467:617-21. 2010
  9. doi Cell polarity: mechanochemical patterning
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstraße 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Trends Cell Biol 23:72-80. 2013
  10. doi Turing's next steps: the mechanochemical basis of morphogenesis
    Jonathon Howard
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 12:392-8. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. ncbi The distribution of active force generators controls mitotic spindle position
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, D 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Science 301:518-21. 2003
    ..Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide- binding protein (Gprotein) alpha subunits is required to generate these astral forces...
  2. pmc PAR proteins diffuse freely across the anterior-posterior boundary in polarized C. elegans embryos
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    J Cell Biol 193:583-94. 2011
    ..We propose that the stably polarized embryo reflects a dynamic steady state in which molecules undergo continuous diffusion between regions of net association and dissociation...
  3. doi Growing up is stressful: biophysical laws of morphogenesis
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 21:647-52. 2011
    ....
  4. doi Polarization of PAR proteins by advective triggering of a pattern-forming system
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Science 334:1137-41. 2011
    ..We suggest that passive advective transport in an active and flowing material may be a general mechanism for mechanochemical pattern formation in developmental systems...
  5. ncbi Spindle oscillations during asymmetric cell division require a threshold number of active cortical force generators
    Jacques Pecreaux
    Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Curr Biol 16:2111-22. 2006
    ..The model predicts that the motor activity must exceed a threshold for oscillations to occur...
  6. pmc FRAP analysis of membrane-associated proteins: lateral diffusion and membrane-cytoplasmic exchange
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Biophys J 99:2443-52. 2010
    ..Because of the flexibility, relative ease of implementation, and its use of standard, easily obtainable bleach geometries, this method should be broadly applicable to investigation of protein dynamics at the plasma membrane...
  7. ncbi Spindle positioning by cortical pulling forces
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, D 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Dev Cell 8:461-5. 2005
    ..We discuss the idea that cortical pulling forces are sufficient to provide a general mechanism for spindle positioning within symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells...
  8. doi Anisotropies in cortical tension reveal the physical basis of polarizing cortical flows
    Mirjam Mayer
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Nature 467:617-21. 2010
    ..We thus reveal the physical requirements of large-scale intracellular cortical flow that ensure the efficient polarization of the C. elegans zygote...
  9. doi Cell polarity: mechanochemical patterning
    Nathan W Goehring
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstraße 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Trends Cell Biol 23:72-80. 2013
    ..Importantly, we find that the core ingredients in this framework - symmetry breaking, self-amplifying feedback, and long-range inhibition - involve processes that can be chemical, mechanical, or even mechanochemical in nature...
  10. doi Turing's next steps: the mechanochemical basis of morphogenesis
    Jonathon Howard
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 12:392-8. 2011
    ..forces and flows generated by motor proteins - can also define length scales and provide a mechanochemical basis for morphogenesis...
  11. pmc Apical migration of nuclei during G2 is a prerequisite for all nuclear motion in zebrafish neuroepithelia
    Louis Leung
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstraße 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Development 138:5003-13. 2011
    ....
  12. doi Forces driving epithelial spreading in zebrafish gastrulation
    Martin Behrndt
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Science 338:257-60. 2012
    ..Thus, actomyosin rings can function in epithelial morphogenesis through a combination of cable-constriction and flow-friction mechanisms...
  13. ncbi Theory of mitotic spindle oscillations
    Stephan W Grill
    Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Phys Rev Lett 94:108104. 2005
    ..This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo...
  14. doi Measuring the complete force field of an optical trap
    Marcus Jahnel
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany
    Opt Lett 36:1260-2. 2011
    ..Surprisingly, we found that the linear detection range for forces exceeds the one for displacement by far. Our approach allows for a complete calibration of an optical trap...
  15. pmc The origin of short transcriptional pauses
    Martin Depken
    Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden, Germany
    Biophys J 96:2189-93. 2009
    ..Based on these results and a quantitative comparison to published pause trajectories measured with optical tweezers, we suggest that a significant fraction of short pauses are simply due to backtracking...
  16. ncbi RGS-7 completes a receptor-independent heterotrimeric G protein cycle to asymmetrically regulate mitotic spindle positioning in C. elegans
    Heather A Hess
    Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Cell 119:209-18. 2004
    ..While GTPase activators typically inactivate G proteins, RGS-7 instead appears to promote G protein function asymmetrically in the cell, perhaps acting as a G protein effector...
  17. ncbi Translation of polarity cues into asymmetric spindle positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos
    Kelly Colombo
    Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research ISREC, 1066 Epalinges Lausanne, Switzerland
    Science 300:1957-61. 2003
    ..Thus, the extent of net pulling forces may depend on cortical Galpha activity, which is regulated by anterior-posterior polarity cues through GPR-1/2...