Notburga Gierlinger

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. pmc Chemical imaging of poplar wood cell walls by confocal Raman microscopy
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant Physiol 140:1246-54. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Molecular changes during tensile deformation of single wood fibers followed by Raman microscopy
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, Potsdam, Germany
    Biomacromolecules 7:2077-81. 2006
  3. pmc Insights into the chemical composition of Equisetum hyemale by high resolution Raman imaging
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Muhlenberg 1, Potsdam Golm, Germany
    Planta 227:969-80. 2008
  4. doi request reprint In situ FT-IR microscopic study on enzymatic treatment of poplar wood cross-sections
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam, Germany
    Biomacromolecules 9:2194-201. 2008
  5. doi request reprint Stress generation in the tension wood of poplar is based on the lateral swelling power of the G-layer
    Luna Goswami
    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant J 56:531-8. 2008
  6. doi request reprint G-fibres in storage roots of Trifolium pratense (Fabaceae): tensile stress generators for contraction
    Nicole Schreiber
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant J 61:854-61. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Tensile and compressive stresses in tracheids are induced by swelling based on geometrical constraints of the wood cell
    Ingo Burgert
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Planta 226:981-7. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Structural and analytical studies of silica accumulations in Equisetum hyemale
    Lanny Sapei
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476, Potsdam Golm, Germany
    Anal Bioanal Chem 389:1249-57. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Polarized infrared microspectroscopy of single spruce fibers: hydrogen bonding in wood polymers
    Martin Schmidt
    Angewandte Physikalische Chemie, Universitat Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
    Biopolymers 83:546-55. 2006

Collaborators

  • Peter Fratzl
  • Catherine Coutand
  • Martin Schmidt
  • Ingo Burgert
  • Nicole Schreiber
  • Luna Goswami
  • Michaela Eder
  • Lanny Sapei
  • Norbert Pütz
  • Christoph Neinhuis
  • George Jeronimidis
  • Karin Jungnikl
  • John W C Dunlop
  • Jürgen Hartmann
  • Oskar Paris
  • Peter Strauch
  • Robert Nöske

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Chemical imaging of poplar wood cell walls by confocal Raman microscopy
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant Physiol 140:1246-54. 2006
    ..5 mum. Scanning Raman microscopy was thus shown to be a powerful, nondestructive tool for imaging changes in molecular cell wall organization with high spatial resolution...
  2. ncbi request reprint Molecular changes during tensile deformation of single wood fibers followed by Raman microscopy
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, Potsdam, Germany
    Biomacromolecules 7:2077-81. 2006
    ....
  3. pmc Insights into the chemical composition of Equisetum hyemale by high resolution Raman imaging
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Muhlenberg 1, Potsdam Golm, Germany
    Planta 227:969-80. 2008
    ..The inner part of the two-layered cells revealed as almost pure cellulose, oriented parallel along the fiber...
  4. doi request reprint In situ FT-IR microscopic study on enzymatic treatment of poplar wood cross-sections
    Notburga Gierlinger
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam, Germany
    Biomacromolecules 9:2194-201. 2008
    ..Young plantation grown hardwood trees with a high proportion of G-fibers thus represent an interesting resource for bioconversion to fermentable sugars in the process to bioethanol...
  5. doi request reprint Stress generation in the tension wood of poplar is based on the lateral swelling power of the G-layer
    Luna Goswami
    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant J 56:531-8. 2008
    ..The results suggest that tensile stresses in poplar are generated in the living plant by a lateral swelling of the G-layer which forces the surrounding secondary cell wall to contract in the axial direction...
  6. doi request reprint G-fibres in storage roots of Trifolium pratense (Fabaceae): tensile stress generators for contraction
    Nicole Schreiber
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant J 61:854-61. 2010
    ..These findings indicate a mechanism of root contraction in T. pratense (red clover) actuated via tension wood fibres, which follows the same principle known for poplar tension wood...
  7. ncbi request reprint Tensile and compressive stresses in tracheids are induced by swelling based on geometrical constraints of the wood cell
    Ingo Burgert
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    Planta 226:981-7. 2007
    ..The reversal of longitudinal extension can be predicted, based on the orientation of the (nearly inextensible) cellulose fibrils and the shape of the cell...
  8. ncbi request reprint Structural and analytical studies of silica accumulations in Equisetum hyemale
    Lanny Sapei
    Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Muhlenberg 1, 14476, Potsdam Golm, Germany
    Anal Bioanal Chem 389:1249-57. 2007
    ..We propose that owing to its specific distribution in E. hyemale, a protective role and possibly also an important biomechanical role are among the most likely functions of silica in these plants...
  9. ncbi request reprint Polarized infrared microspectroscopy of single spruce fibers: hydrogen bonding in wood polymers
    Martin Schmidt
    Angewandte Physikalische Chemie, Universitat Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
    Biopolymers 83:546-55. 2006
    ..Our in situ approach contributes to a further understanding of the structural details of wood polymers in their native setting...