Wolfgang Forstmeier

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Maternal effects influence the sexual behavior of sons and daughters in the zebra finch
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    University of Sheffield, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, United Kingdom
    Evolution 58:2574-83. 2004
  2. pmc Quantitative genetics and behavioural correlates of digit ratio in the zebra finch
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    University of Sheffield and Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, Postfach 1564, 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2641-9. 2005
  3. doi request reprint Digit ratio unaffected by estradiol treatment of zebra finch nestlings
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 156:379-84. 2008
  4. pmc No band color effects on male courtship rate or body mass in the zebra finch: four experiments and a meta-analysis
    Aurélie Seguin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    PLoS ONE 7:e37785. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in zebra finches: microsatellite markers can be better than their reputation
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str 8, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 21:3237-49. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Genetic variation and differentiation in captive and wild zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 16:4039-50. 2007
  7. pmc Female extrapair mating behavior can evolve via indirect selection on males
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, The Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:10608-13. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Women have relatively larger brains than men: a comment on the misuse of general linear models in the study of sexual dimorphism
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294:1856-63. 2011
  9. doi request reprint The genetic basis of zebra finch vocalizations
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Evolution 63:2114-30. 2009
  10. pmc Do individual females differ intrinsically in their propensity to engage in extra-pair copulations?
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e952. 2007

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. ncbi request reprint Maternal effects influence the sexual behavior of sons and daughters in the zebra finch
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    University of Sheffield, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, United Kingdom
    Evolution 58:2574-83. 2004
    ....
  2. pmc Quantitative genetics and behavioural correlates of digit ratio in the zebra finch
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    University of Sheffield and Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, Postfach 1564, 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2641-9. 2005
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Digit ratio unaffected by estradiol treatment of zebra finch nestlings
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 156:379-84. 2008
    ..Hence, it seems unlikely that the estradiol level during the main growth phase is the pleiotropic agent that causes digit ratio to correlate with sex-hormone dependent behavioral and physiological traits...
  4. pmc No band color effects on male courtship rate or body mass in the zebra finch: four experiments and a meta-analysis
    Aurélie Seguin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    PLoS ONE 7:e37785. 2012
    ..02) nor male body mass (d=-0.07). The present case is a reminder that replication of experiments lies at the heart of distinguishing between real effects and false positive findings...
  5. doi request reprint Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in zebra finches: microsatellite markers can be better than their reputation
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str 8, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 21:3237-49. 2012
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Genetic variation and differentiation in captive and wild zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Postfach 1564, D 82305 Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 16:4039-50. 2007
    ..By providing a tree of the genetic similarity of the different captive populations, we hope to contribute to a better understanding of variation in research findings obtained by different laboratories...
  7. pmc Female extrapair mating behavior can evolve via indirect selection on males
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, The Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:10608-13. 2011
    ..This behavior leads to a fundamentally different view of female extrapair mating: it may exist even if females obtain no net benefit from it, simply because the corresponding alleles were positively selected in the male ancestors...
  8. doi request reprint Women have relatively larger brains than men: a comment on the misuse of general linear models in the study of sexual dimorphism
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294:1856-63. 2011
    ..Alternatively, in cases where isometry can be established there are no objections against and good reasons for the continued use of ratios as a simple means of correcting for size differences...
  9. doi request reprint The genetic basis of zebra finch vocalizations
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Evolution 63:2114-30. 2009
    ..Hence, these traits that are often suspected to be sexually selected would hardly respond to current directional selection...
  10. pmc Do individual females differ intrinsically in their propensity to engage in extra-pair copulations?
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 2:e952. 2007
    ....
  11. pmc A polymorphism in the oestrogen receptor gene explains covariance between digit ratio and mating behaviour
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, D 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3353-61. 2010
    ..Finally, we note that the commonly invoked effect of foetal testosterone on human digit ratio seems to be substantially weaker than the effect described here...
  12. pmc Correlates of male fitness in captive zebra finches--a comparison of methods to disentangle genetic and environmental effects
    Elisabeth Bolund
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse 5, Seewiesen, 82 319, Germany
    BMC Evol Biol 11:327. 2011
    ..We here examine different methods of doing this for a captive zebra finch population where male fitness was measured in communal aviaries in relation to three phenotypic traits (tarsus length, beak colour and song rate)...
  13. doi request reprint QTL and quantitative genetic analysis of beak morphology reveals patterns of standing genetic variation in an Estrildid finch
    Ulrich Knief
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    Mol Ecol 21:3704-17. 2012
    ..Five QTL do not cover known candidates demonstrating that yet unknown genes or regulatory elements may influence beak morphology in the zebra finch...
  14. pmc Trisomy and triploidy are sources of embryo mortality in the zebra finch
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2655-60. 2010
    ....
  15. pmc Heritability of and early environment effects on variation in mating preferences
    Holger Schielzeth
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Evolution 64:998-1006. 2010
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint A quantitative genetic approach to understanding aggressive behavior
    Bart Kempenaers
    Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Starnberg Seewiesen, Germany
    Behav Brain Sci 32:282-3; discussion 292-311. 2009
    ..As to its heritable component, future studies on the genetic architecture of aggressive behavior across different contexts could shed more light on the evolutionary origins of male-female versus male-male aggression...
  17. doi request reprint QTL linkage mapping of wing length in zebra finch using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms markers
    Holger Schielzeth
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, Norbyvagen 18D, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
    Mol Ecol 21:329-39. 2012
    ..Our findings therefore suggest that standing genetic variation in the Wnt genes might be linked to avian wing morphology, although there are many other genes that also fall within the confidence regions...
  18. pmc Compensatory investment in zebra finches: females lay larger eggs when paired to sexually unattractive males
    Elisabeth Bolund
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 82 319 Seewiesen, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 276:707-15. 2009
    ..We stress that in more promiscuous species, the benefits of classical differential allocation may partly be neutralized by the supposed benefits of CI...
  19. pmc Do zebra finch parents fail to recognise their own offspring?
    Hendrik Reers
    Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
    PLoS ONE 6:e18466. 2011
    ..Our results demonstrate the importance of adopting a receiver's perspective and suggest that variation in fledgling contact calls might not be used in individual recognition of offspring...
  20. ncbi request reprint Constrained performance in a communication network: implications for the function of song-type matching and for the evolution of multiple ornaments
    David M Logue
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Avenue, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4, Canada
    Am Nat 172:34-41. 2008
    ..The phenomenon that dissimilar signals are less accurately compared than similar signals may favor the evolution of multiple ornaments and of plastic signal development (e.g., song learning) in general...
  21. pmc A novel song parameter correlates with extra-pair paternity and reflects male longevity
    Wolfgang Forstmeier
    Max Planck Research Centre for Ornithology, Vogelwarte Radolfzell, Schloss Moeggingen, Schlossallee 2, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1479-85. 2002
    ..In addition, observations on territorial conflicts indicate that attractive males invest less in competition over territories because they can reproduce via extra-pair paternity...