David Buttelmann

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Behavioral cues that great apes use to forage for hidden food
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 11:117-28. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Enculturated chimpanzees imitate rationally
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 10:F31-8. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Rational tool use and tool choice in human infants and great apes
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 79:609-26. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 112:337-42. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Do great apes use emotional expressions to infer desires?
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 12:688-98. 2009
  6. doi request reprint The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation
    Norbert Zmyj
    Department of Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
    J Exp Child Psychol 106:208-20. 2010
  7. doi request reprint Eighteen-month-olds understand false beliefs in an unexpected-contents task
    David Buttelmann
    Research Group Kleinkindforschung in Thueringen, University of Erfurt, D 99089 Erfurt, Germany Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany Electronic address
    J Exp Child Psychol 119:120-6. 2014
  8. ncbi request reprint Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) use a physical marker to locate hidden food
    Julia Riedel
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6 D 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 9:27-35. 2006

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Behavioral cues that great apes use to forage for hidden food
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 11:117-28. 2008
    ..Thus, great apes were able to use a variety of experimenter-given cues associated with foraging actions to locate hidden food and thereby were partially sensitive to the general purpose underlying these actions...
  2. ncbi request reprint Enculturated chimpanzees imitate rationally
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 10:F31-8. 2007
    ..Enculturated chimpanzees thus have some understanding of the rationality of others' intentional actions, and use this understanding when imitating others...
  3. doi request reprint Rational tool use and tool choice in human infants and great apes
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Child Dev 79:609-26. 2008
    ..Only some apes thus show an understanding of others' intentions as rational choices of action plans...
  4. doi request reprint Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Cognition 112:337-42. 2009
    ..Results for 16-month-olds were in the same direction but less clear. These results represent by far the youngest age of false belief understanding in a task with an active behavioral measure...
  5. doi request reprint Do great apes use emotional expressions to infer desires?
    David Buttelmann
    Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Dev Sci 12:688-98. 2009
    ..These findings suggest that great apes understand both the directedness and the valence of some human emotional expressions, and can use this understanding to infer desires...
  6. doi request reprint The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation
    Norbert Zmyj
    Department of Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
    J Exp Child Psychol 106:208-20. 2010
    ..We conclude that already by 14 months of age, infants discriminate between reliable and unreliable models when learning novel actions...
  7. doi request reprint Eighteen-month-olds understand false beliefs in an unexpected-contents task
    David Buttelmann
    Research Group Kleinkindforschung in Thueringen, University of Erfurt, D 99089 Erfurt, Germany Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany Electronic address
    J Exp Child Psychol 119:120-6. 2014
    ..These results help to demonstrate the flexibility of infants' false-belief understanding. ..
  8. ncbi request reprint Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) use a physical marker to locate hidden food
    Julia Riedel
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6 D 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    Anim Cogn 9:27-35. 2006
    ..Results showed that dogs did not differentiate intentional and accidental placing of the marker. These results suggest that dogs use the marker as a genuine communicative cue quite independently from the experimenter's actions...