A Boetius

Summary

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. pmc Microfauna-macrofauna interaction in the seafloor: lessons from the tubeworm
    Antje Boetius
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    PLoS Biol 3:e102. 2005
  2. ncbi In vitro cell growth of marine archaeal-bacterial consortia during anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate
    Katja Nauhaus
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 9:187-96. 2007
  3. pmc Consumption of methane and CO2 by methanotrophic microbial mats from gas seeps of the anoxic Black Sea
    Tina Treude
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Biogeochemistry, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany corrected
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:2271-83. 2007
  4. ncbi A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane
    A Boetius
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    Nature 407:623-6. 2000
  5. ncbi Ocean science. Lost City life
    Antje Boetius
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Science 307:1420-2. 2005
  6. pmc Diversity and abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:3348-62. 2007
  7. ncbi Environmental regulation of the anaerobic oxidation of methane: a comparison of ANME-I and ANME-II communities
    Katja Nauhaus
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 7:98-106. 2005
  8. pmc Biogeochemistry and community composition of iron- and sulfur-precipitating microbial mats at the Chefren mud volcano (Nile Deep Sea Fan, Eastern Mediterranean)
    Enoma O Omoregie
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:3198-215. 2008
  9. doi Endosymbioses between bacteria and deep-sea siboglinid tubeworms from an Arctic Cold Seep (Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea)
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 10:3237-54. 2008
  10. pmc Effects of temperature and pressure on sulfate reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane in hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin
    Jens Kallmeyer
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 70:1231-3. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. pmc Microfauna-macrofauna interaction in the seafloor: lessons from the tubeworm
    Antje Boetius
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    PLoS Biol 3:e102. 2005
  2. ncbi In vitro cell growth of marine archaeal-bacterial consortia during anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate
    Katja Nauhaus
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 9:187-96. 2007
    ....
  3. pmc Consumption of methane and CO2 by methanotrophic microbial mats from gas seeps of the anoxic Black Sea
    Tina Treude
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Biogeochemistry, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany corrected
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:2271-83. 2007
    ..However, since considerable methane formation was observed only in the presence of methane and sulfate, the process appeared to be a rereaction of anaerobic oxidation of methane rather than net methanogenesis...
  4. ncbi A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane
    A Boetius
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    Nature 407:623-6. 2000
    ..These aggregates were abundant in gas-hydrate-rich sediments with extremely high rates of methane-based sulphate reduction, and apparently mediate anaerobic oxidation of methane...
  5. ncbi Ocean science. Lost City life
    Antje Boetius
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Science 307:1420-2. 2005
  6. pmc Diversity and abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:3348-62. 2007
    ..Our results further support the hypothesis of Niemann et al. (54), that high methane availability and different fluid flow regimens at the HMMV provide distinct niches for aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs...
  7. ncbi Environmental regulation of the anaerobic oxidation of methane: a comparison of ANME-I and ANME-II communities
    Katja Nauhaus
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 7:98-106. 2005
    ..In conclusion, the ecological niches of methanotrophic Archaea seem to be mainly defined by the availability of methane and sulfate, but it remains open which additional factors lead to the dominance of ANME-I or -II in the environment...
  8. pmc Biogeochemistry and community composition of iron- and sulfur-precipitating microbial mats at the Chefren mud volcano (Nile Deep Sea Fan, Eastern Mediterranean)
    Enoma O Omoregie
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:3198-215. 2008
    ..Both mats and the sediments underneath them hosted very diverse microbial communities and contained mineral precipitates, most likely due to differences in fluid flow patterns...
  9. doi Endosymbioses between bacteria and deep-sea siboglinid tubeworms from an Arctic Cold Seep (Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea)
    Tina Lösekann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 10:3237-54. 2008
    ..In O. haakonmosbiensis, stable carbon isotope values of fatty acids and cholesterol of -70 per thousand are difficult to reconcile with our current knowledge of isotope signatures for chemoautotrophic processes...
  10. pmc Effects of temperature and pressure on sulfate reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane in hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin
    Jens Kallmeyer
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 70:1231-3. 2004
    ..A maximum SR of several micromoles per cubic centimeter per day was found at between 60 and 95 degrees C and 2.2 x 10(7) and 4.5 x 10(7) Pa. Maximal AOM was observed at 35 to 90 degrees C but generally accounted for less than 5% of SR...
  11. ncbi Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink
    Helge Niemann
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Nature 443:854-8. 2006
    ..This mechanism limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux...
  12. ncbi In situ experimental evidence of the fate of a phytodetritus pulse at the abyssal sea floor
    U Witte
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Nature 424:763-6. 2003
    ..The retarded response of bacteria and Foraminifera, the restriction of microbial carbon degradation to the sediment surface, and the low total carbon turnover distinguish abyssal from continental-slope 'deep-sea' sediments...
  13. doi Inter- and intra-habitat bacterial diversity associated with cold-water corals
    Sandra Schöttner
    Microbial habitat group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 3:756-9. 2009
    ..These findings strongly indicate characteristic coral-microbe associations and, furthermore, suggest that the variety of coral-generated habitats within reef systems promotes microbial diversity in the deep ocean...
  14. doi Niche differentiation among mat-forming, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria at cold seeps of the Nile Deep Sea Fan (Eastern Mediterranean Sea)
    S Grünke
    HGF MPG Joint Research Group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
    Geobiology 9:330-48. 2011
    ....
  15. ncbi Feast and famine--microbial life in the deep-sea bed
    Bo Barker Jørgensen
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen D 28359, Germany
    Nat Rev Microbiol 5:770-81. 2007
    ..Here, we review microbial biodiversity and function in these intriguing environments...
  16. doi Anaerobic oxidation of methane: progress with an unknown process
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen 28359, Germany
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:311-34. 2009
    ..This review summarizes what is known and unknown about AOM on earth and its key catalysts, the ANME clades and their bacterial partners...
  17. pmc Diversity and distribution of methanotrophic archaea at cold seeps
    Katrin Knittel
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Molecular Ecology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:467-79. 2005
    ..These variations in the distribution, diversity, and morphology of methanotrophic consortia are discussed with respect to the presence of microbial ecotypes, niche formation, and biogeography...
  18. ncbi Novel observations of Thiobacterium, a sulfur-storing Gammaproteobacterium producing gelatinous mats
    Stefanie Grünke
    HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
    ISME J 4:1031-43. 2010
    ..Further phylogenetic characterization of the mats led to the discovery of an unexpected microbial diversity associated with Thiobacterium...
  19. pmc Subsurface microbial methanotrophic mats in the Black Sea
    Tina Treude
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:6375-8. 2005
    ..This mat was dominated by ANME-1 archaea and consumed methane and sulfate simultaneously. We propose that such subsurface mats represent the initial stage of previously investigated microbial reefs...
  20. doi Assimilation of methane and inorganic carbon by microbial communities mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane
    Gunter Wegener
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstr 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 10:2287-98. 2008
    ..Carbon assimilation efficiencies of the methanotrophic consortia were low, with only 0.25-1.3 mol% of the methane oxidized...
  21. ncbi Time- and sediment depth-related variations in bacterial diversity and community structure in subtidal sands
    Simone I Böer
    Microbial habitat group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 3:780-91. 2009
    ..Principal ecosystem functions such as benthic oxygen consumption and extracellular hydrolysis of organic matter were, however, at a high level at all times, indicating functional redundancy in the microbial communities...
  22. pmc Improved dsrA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of sulfate-reducing bacteria
    DANIEL SANTILLANO
    Microbial habitat group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:5308-11. 2010
    ..A new reverse primer that increased allelic diversity estimates up to 5-fold was applied to hydrocarbon seep samples to examine the relationship between guild activity and diversity...
  23. ncbi Biological and chemical sulfide oxidation in a Beggiatoa inhabited marine sediment
    André Preisler
    Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 1:341-53. 2007
    ..Indeed sulfide is a repellent for Beggiatoa...
  24. doi Impact of space, time and complex environments on microbial communities
    A Ramette
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    Clin Microbiol Infect 15:60-2. 2009
    ..Here, we briefly review the likely causes that may explain this remarkable scientific revolution and present a synthesized view about how to describe microbial communities in their complex environmental context...
  25. doi Bacterial taxa-area and distance-decay relationships in marine environments
    L Zinger
    HGF MPG Joint Research Group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen, D 28359, Germany CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, UMR5174 EDB, 118 route de Narbonne, Toulouse, F 31062, France
    Mol Ecol 23:954-64. 2014
    ....
  26. doi On the relationship between methane production and oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic communities from cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico
    Beth Orcutt
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
    Environ Microbiol 10:1108-17. 2008
    ..The addition of acetate, a possible breakdown product of petroleum in situ and a potential intermediate in AOM/SR syntrophy, did not suppress AOM activity; rather acetate stimulated microbial activity in oily sediment slurries...
  27. ncbi In vitro demonstration of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulphate reduction in sediment from a marine gas hydrate area
    Katja Nauhaus
    Max Planck Institut für Marine Mikrobiologie, D 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Environ Microbiol 4:296-305. 2002
    ..Hence, the experiments did not provide evidence for one of these compounds acting as a free extracellular intermediate (intercellular shuttle) during AOM by the presently investigated consortia...
  28. pmc Microbial community in a sediment-hosted CO2 lake of the southern Okinawa Trough hydrothermal system
    Fumio Inagaki
    Subground Animalcule Retrieval SUGAR Program, Extremobiosphere Research Center, Japan Agency for Marine Earth Science and Technology JAMSTEC, Yokosuka 237 0061, Japan
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:14164-9. 2006
    ..Clearly, the Yonaguni Knoll is an exceptional natural laboratory for the study of consequences of CO2 disposal as well as of natural CO2 reservoirs as potential microbial habitats on early Earth and other celestial bodies...
  29. ncbi Desulfobacter psychrotolerans sp. nov., a new psychrotolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium and descriptions of its physiological response to temperature changes
    Irene H Tarpgaard
    Department of Microbiology, Bldg 540, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 89:109-24. 2006
    ..hydrogenophilus and strain akvb(T). Based on phenotypic and DNA-based characteristics we propose that strain akvb(T) is a member of a new species, Desulfobacter psychrotolerans sp. nov...
  30. ncbi Microbial reefs in the Black Sea fueled by anaerobic oxidation of methane
    Walter Michaelis
    Institute of Biogeochemistry and Marine Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
    Science 297:1013-5. 2002
    ..Obviously, anaerobic microbial consortia can generate both carbonate precipitation and substantial biomass accumulation, which has implications for our understanding of carbon cycling during earlier periods of Earth's history...