F Winau

Summary

Affiliation: Max-Planck-Institute for Infection Biology
Country: Germany

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Emil von Behring and serum therapy
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstrabetae 21 22, 10117, Berlin, Germany
    Microbes Infect 4:185-8. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Starring stellate cells in liver immunology
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Curr Opin Immunol 20:68-74. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint Ito cells are liver-resident antigen-presenting cells for activating T cell responses
    Florian Winau
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Immunity 26:117-29. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Paul Ehrlich--in search of the magic bullet
    Florian Winau
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Microbes Infect 6:786-9. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint No life without death--apoptosis as prerequisite for T cell activation
    F Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstr 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Apoptosis 10:707-15. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Apoptotic vesicles crossprime CD8 T cells and protect against tuberculosis
    Florian Winau
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Immunity 24:105-17. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Saposin C is required for lipid presentation by human CD1b
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Immunol 5:169-74. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint From bacteriology to immunology: the dualism of specificity
    Stefan H E Kaufmann
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Immunol 6:1063-6. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Apoptosis paves the detour path for CD8 T cell activation against intracellular bacteria
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstr 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Cell Microbiol 6:599-607. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Apoptosis facilitates antigen presentation to T lymphocytes through MHC-I and CD1 in tuberculosis
    Ulrich E Schaible
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Med 9:1039-46. 2003

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi request reprint Emil von Behring and serum therapy
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstrabetae 21 22, 10117, Berlin, Germany
    Microbes Infect 4:185-8. 2002
    ..We present an overview of the development of this important tool in the treatment of diphtheria. In a historical context Behring's work reflects the scientific spirit of fin de si├Ęcle Berlin...
  2. ncbi request reprint Starring stellate cells in liver immunology
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Curr Opin Immunol 20:68-74. 2008
    ..Finally, future studies will show whether in the firmament of immunology stellate cells will represent fixed or falling stars...
  3. ncbi request reprint Ito cells are liver-resident antigen-presenting cells for activating T cell responses
    Florian Winau
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Immunity 26:117-29. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Paul Ehrlich--in search of the magic bullet
    Florian Winau
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Microbes Infect 6:786-9. 2004
    ..Paul Ehrlich can be perceived as a man whose success was not the consequence of a will to power, but of his substantial interest in science...
  5. ncbi request reprint No life without death--apoptosis as prerequisite for T cell activation
    F Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstr 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Apoptosis 10:707-15. 2005
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Apoptotic vesicles crossprime CD8 T cells and protect against tuberculosis
    Florian Winau
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Immunity 24:105-17. 2006
    ..tuberculosis infection. Taken together, we propose the detour pathway to represent a genuine immunological mechanism mediating crosspriming of CD8 T cells in vivo and protection against tuberculosis...
  7. ncbi request reprint Saposin C is required for lipid presentation by human CD1b
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Immunol 5:169-74. 2004
    ..We propose a model in which SAP-C exposes lipid antigens from intralysosomal membranes for loading onto CD1b. Thus, SAP-C represents a missing link in antigen presentation of lipids through CD1b to human T cells...
  8. ncbi request reprint From bacteriology to immunology: the dualism of specificity
    Stefan H E Kaufmann
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Immunol 6:1063-6. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Apoptosis paves the detour path for CD8 T cell activation against intracellular bacteria
    Florian Winau
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstr 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Cell Microbiol 6:599-607. 2004
    ..This important new function of cell death in antibacterial immunity requires consideration for rational vaccine design...
  10. ncbi request reprint Apoptosis facilitates antigen presentation to T lymphocytes through MHC-I and CD1 in tuberculosis
    Ulrich E Schaible
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Immunology, Schumannstrasse 21 22, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Med 9:1039-46. 2003
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Viral danger signals control CD1d de novo synthesis and NKT cell activation
    Martin J Raftery
    Institute of Virology, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Eur J Immunol 38:668-79. 2008
    ..In conclusion, our data indicate that viral danger signals trigger NKT cell activation by enhancing CD1d de novo synthesis through increasing the abundance of CD1D mRNA in human myeloid DC...
  12. pmc Inhibition of CD1 antigen presentation by human cytomegalovirus
    Martin J Raftery
    Institute of Virology, Charite Medical School, Chariteplatz 1, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    J Virol 82:4308-19. 2008
    ..HCMV present in antigen-presenting cells thus blunts the immune response by the blockage of CD1 molecules...
  13. ncbi request reprint Cholesterol glucosylation promotes immune evasion by Helicobacter pylori
    Christian Wunder
    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany
    Nat Med 12:1030-8. 2006
    ..Thus, we propose a mechanism regulating the host-pathogen interaction whereby glucosylation of a lipid tips the scales towards immune evasion or response...
  14. ncbi request reprint CD1 antigen presentation by human dendritic cells as a target for herpes simplex virus immune evasion
    Martin J Raftery
    Institute of Virology, Charite Medical School, Humboldt University Berlin, Schumannstrasse 20 21, D 10117 Berlin, Germany
    J Immunol 177:6207-14. 2006
    ..Thus, we demonstrate both the existence of a CD1 pathway allowing human DC to react to viral infection, as well as its blockage by a human herpesvirus...
  15. ncbi request reprint Lipid-binding proteins in membrane digestion, antigen presentation, and antimicrobial defense
    Thomas Kolter
    Kekule Institut fur Organische Chemie und Biochemie, D 53121 Bonn, Germany
    J Biol Chem 280:41125-8. 2005