Jan Henning Dirks

Summary

Country: Germany

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Fatigue of insect cuticle
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
    J Exp Biol 216:1924-7. 2013
  2. pmc Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
    PLoS ONE 7:e43411. 2012
  3. doi request reprint In vivo dynamics of the internal fibrous structure in smooth adhesive pads of insects
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Acta Biomater 8:2730-6. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Fracture toughness of locust cuticle
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
    J Exp Biol 215:1502-8. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Biomechanics of the stick insect antenna: damping properties and structural correlates of the cuticle
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, 2 Dublin, Ireland
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 4:2031-42. 2011
  6. pmc Mechanisms of fluid production in smooth adhesive pads of insects
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J R Soc Interface 8:952-60. 2011
  7. pmc Insect tricks: two-phasic foot pad secretion prevents slipping
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J R Soc Interface 7:587-93. 2010
  8. pmc Shape optimization in exoskeletons and endoskeletons: a biomechanics analysis
    David Taylor
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
    J R Soc Interface 9:3480-9. 2012
  9. doi request reprint Friction ridges in cockroach climbing pads: anisotropy of shear stress measured on transparent, microstructured substrates
    Christofer J Clemente
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 195:805-14. 2009
  10. pmc Arachnids secrete a fluid over their adhesive pads
    Anne M Peattie
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e20485. 2011

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Fatigue of insect cuticle
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
    J Exp Biol 216:1924-7. 2013
    ..These results are further discussed in relation to the evolution and normal use of these two body parts...
  2. pmc Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
    PLoS ONE 7:e43411. 2012
    ..Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species...
  3. doi request reprint In vivo dynamics of the internal fibrous structure in smooth adhesive pads of insects
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Acta Biomater 8:2730-6. 2012
    ..Direct strain measurements in the contact zone demonstrated that pulls not only expand the cuticle laterally, but also add new contact area at the pad's outer edge...
  4. doi request reprint Fracture toughness of locust cuticle
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
    J Exp Biol 215:1502-8. 2012
    ..These findings thus might inspire the development of new biomimetic composite materials...
  5. doi request reprint Biomechanics of the stick insect antenna: damping properties and structural correlates of the cuticle
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, 2 Dublin, Ireland
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 4:2031-42. 2011
    ..We conclude that in the stick-insect antenna the cuticle properties described are structural correlates of damping, allowing for a straight posture in the instant of a new contact event, combined with a maximum of flexibility...
  6. pmc Mechanisms of fluid production in smooth adhesive pads of insects
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J R Soc Interface 8:952-60. 2011
    ..Our results show that fluid secretion in insect wet adhesive systems relies on simple physical principles, allowing for passive control of fluid volume within the contact zone...
  7. pmc Insect tricks: two-phasic foot pad secretion prevents slipping
    Jan Henning Dirks
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J R Soc Interface 7:587-93. 2010
    ..Emulsions as adhesive secretions combine the benefits of 'wet' adhesion and resistance against shear forces...
  8. pmc Shape optimization in exoskeletons and endoskeletons: a biomechanics analysis
    David Taylor
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
    J R Soc Interface 9:3480-9. 2012
    ..We conclude that our theoretical model, though it has some limitations, is useful for investigating evolutionary development of skeletal form in exoskeletons and endoskeletons...
  9. doi request reprint Friction ridges in cockroach climbing pads: anisotropy of shear stress measured on transparent, microstructured substrates
    Christofer J Clemente
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 195:805-14. 2009
    ..Our findings show that cockroach euplantulae generate friction using both interlocking and adhesion...
  10. pmc Arachnids secrete a fluid over their adhesive pads
    Anne M Peattie
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e20485. 2011
    ..Indeed, the consensus in the literature is that spiders and their smooth-padded relatives, the solifugids, adhere without the aid of a secretion...