Winifred F Frick

Summary

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Nestedness of desert bat assemblages: species composition patterns in insular and terrestrial landscapes
    Winifred F Frick
    Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, 321 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA
    Oecologia 158:687-97. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Influence of climate and reproductive timing on demography of little brown myotis Myotis lucifugus
    Winifred F Frick
    Center of Ecology and Conservation Biology CECB, Boston University, Biology Department, 5 Cummington St, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Anim Ecol 79:128-36. 2010
  3. doi request reprint An emerging disease causes regional population collapse of a common North American bat species
    Winifred F Frick
    Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology CECB, Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Science 329:679-82. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Sociality, density-dependence and microclimates determine the persistence of populations suffering from a novel fungal disease, white-nose syndrome
    Kate E Langwig
    Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Ecol Lett 15:1050-7. 2012
  5. pmc Risk factors associated with mortality from white-nose syndrome among hibernating bat colonies
    Aryn P Wilder
    Department of Biology, Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Biol Lett 7:950-3. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Potential effects of environmental contamination on Yuma Myotis demography and population growth
    Winifred F Frick
    Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1213-22. 2007

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. doi request reprint Nestedness of desert bat assemblages: species composition patterns in insular and terrestrial landscapes
    Winifred F Frick
    Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, 321 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA
    Oecologia 158:687-97. 2009
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Influence of climate and reproductive timing on demography of little brown myotis Myotis lucifugus
    Winifred F Frick
    Center of Ecology and Conservation Biology CECB, Boston University, Biology Department, 5 Cummington St, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Anim Ecol 79:128-36. 2010
    ..lucifugus, in the northeastern United States...
  3. doi request reprint An emerging disease causes regional population collapse of a common North American bat species
    Winifred F Frick
    Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology CECB, Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Science 329:679-82. 2010
    ..Novel diseases can have serious impacts on naïve wildlife populations, which in turn can have substantial impacts on ecosystem integrity...
  4. doi request reprint Sociality, density-dependence and microclimates determine the persistence of populations suffering from a novel fungal disease, white-nose syndrome
    Kate E Langwig
    Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Ecol Lett 15:1050-7. 2012
    ..These results expand our theoretical framework and provide an empirical basis for determining which host species are likely to be driven extinct while management action is still possible...
  5. pmc Risk factors associated with mortality from white-nose syndrome among hibernating bat colonies
    Aryn P Wilder
    Department of Biology, Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Biol Lett 7:950-3. 2011
    ..Our results suggest that the timing of mortality from WNS is largely dependent on colony location, and large colonies tend to be first in an area to experience high mortality associated with WNS...
  6. ncbi request reprint Potential effects of environmental contamination on Yuma Myotis demography and population growth
    Winifred F Frick
    Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1213-22. 2007
    ..The spill-affected population was in decline for the first year of the study as indicated by an estimated growth rate (lambda) < 1, but population growth rates increased during the four-year period...