Alistair R Evans

Summary

Affiliation: Disaster Mental Health Institute

Publications

  1. pmc The maximum rate of mammal evolution
    Alistair R Evans
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:4187-90. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Spatial and functional modeling of carnivore and insectivore molariform teeth
    Alistair R Evans
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton Campus, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Morphol 267:649-62. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint High-level similarity of dentitions in carnivorans and rodents
    Alistair R Evans
    Evolution and Development Unit, Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 56 Viikinkaari 9, FIN 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
    Nature 445:78-81. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Patterns of maximum body size evolution in Cenozoic land mammals: eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing
    Juha J Saarinen
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA, Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA, Department of Biology and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, Australia, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA, Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM, USA, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA, School of Biological Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20132049. 2014
  5. ncbi request reprint Predicting evolutionary patterns of mammalian teeth from development
    Kathryn D Kavanagh
    Evolution and Development Unit, Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 56 Viikinkaari 9, FIN 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
    Nature 449:427-32. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Nonindependence of mammalian dental characters
    Aapo T Kangas
    Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 56, FIN 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    Nature 432:211-4. 2004
  7. pmc Automated 3D phenotype analysis using data mining
    Ilya Plyusnin
    Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    PLoS ONE 3:e1742. 2008
  8. pmc Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals
    Peter D Smits
    Department of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, AUS
    BMC Evol Biol 12:146. 2012
  9. pmc The sharpest tools in the box? Quantitative analysis of conodont element functional morphology
    David Jones
    School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2849-54. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc The maximum rate of mammal evolution
    Alistair R Evans
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:4187-90. 2012
    ..Our findings allow more rigorous comparisons of microevolutionary and macroevolutionary patterns and processes...
  2. ncbi request reprint Spatial and functional modeling of carnivore and insectivore molariform teeth
    Alistair R Evans
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton Campus, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Morphol 267:649-62. 2006
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint High-level similarity of dentitions in carnivorans and rodents
    Alistair R Evans
    Evolution and Development Unit, Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 56 Viikinkaari 9, FIN 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
    Nature 445:78-81. 2007
    ..This link between diet and phenotype will be useful for inferring the ecology of extinct species and illustrates the potential of fast-throughput, high-level analysis of the phenotype...
  4. ncbi request reprint Patterns of maximum body size evolution in Cenozoic land mammals: eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing
    Juha J Saarinen
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA, Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA, Department of Biology and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, Australia, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA, Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM, USA, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA, School of Biological Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20132049. 2014
    ..We conclude that the macroevolutionary patterns observed are a result of the interplay between eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing. ..
  5. ncbi request reprint Predicting evolutionary patterns of mammalian teeth from development
    Kathryn D Kavanagh
    Evolution and Development Unit, Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 56 Viikinkaari 9, FIN 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
    Nature 449:427-32. 2007
    ..In general, our work demonstrates how to construct and test developmental rules with evolutionary predictability in natural systems...
  6. ncbi request reprint Nonindependence of mammalian dental characters
    Aapo T Kangas
    Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 56, FIN 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    Nature 432:211-4. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that most aspects of tooth shape have the developmental potential for correlated changes during evolution which may, if not taken into account, obscure phylogenetic history...
  7. pmc Automated 3D phenotype analysis using data mining
    Ilya Plyusnin
    Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    PLoS ONE 3:e1742. 2008
    ..The current study represents a first step in the automatic analysis of 3D phenotypes, which will be increasingly valuable with the future increase in 3D morphology and phenomics databases...
  8. pmc Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals
    Peter D Smits
    Department of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, AUS
    BMC Evol Biol 12:146. 2012
    ..By sampling two distantly related groups of ecologically similar mammals, we study carnivorous mammals in general rather than a specific group of mammals...
  9. pmc The sharpest tools in the box? Quantitative analysis of conodont element functional morphology
    David Jones
    School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2849-54. 2012
    ..Our work places conodont elements within a broader dental framework, providing a phylogenetically independent system for examining convergence and scaling in dental tools...