Liqin Xiong

Summary

Affiliation: Shanghai Jiaotong University
Country: China

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Cytotoxicity, tumor targeting and PET imaging of sub-5 nm KGdF4 multifunctional rare earth nanoparticles
    Xinmin Cao
    School of Biomedical Engineering, Med X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200030, P R China
    Nanoscale 7:13404-9. 2015
  2. pmc Synthesis of ligand-functionalized water-soluble [18F]YF3 nanoparticles for PET imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Stanford Molecular Imaging Program MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Nanoscale 5:3253-6. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Long-term-stable near-infrared polymer dots with ultrasmall size and narrow-band emission for imaging tumor vasculature in vivo
    Liqin Xiong
    School of Biomedical Engineering, Med X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, P R China
    Bioconjug Chem 26:817-21. 2015
  4. pmc Efficient method for site-specific 18F-labeling of biomolecules using the rapid condensation reaction between 2-cyanobenzothiazole and cysteine
    Jongho Jeon
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 23:1902-8. 2012
  5. pmc Self-luminescing BRET-FRET near-infrared dots for in vivo lymph-node mapping and tumour imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Commun 3:1193. 2012
  6. doi request reprint Multimodal-luminescence core-shell nanocomposites for targeted imaging of tumor cells
    He Hu
    Department of Chemistry and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai, P R China
    Chemistry 15:3577-84. 2009
  7. pmc Redox-triggered self-assembly of gadolinium-based MRI probes for sensing reducing environment
    Deju Ye
    Molecular Imaging Program, Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, United States
    Bioconjug Chem 25:1526-36. 2014

Collaborators

  • Jianghong Rao
  • Yang Yang
  • Xinmin Cao
  • Deju Ye
  • Tianye Cao
  • Fuyou Li
  • Jongho Jeon
  • He Hu
  • Fengwen Cao
  • Yixiao Guo
  • Wangxi Hai
  • Yimin Zhang
  • Xi Cai
  • Biao Li
  • Jianguo Lin
  • Brian Rutt
  • Paul Kempen
  • Prachi Pandit
  • Robert Sinclair
  • Bin Shen
  • Kyung Hyun Lee
  • Frederick T Chin
  • Zheng Miao
  • Jing Zhou
  • Chunhui Huang

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. doi request reprint Cytotoxicity, tumor targeting and PET imaging of sub-5 nm KGdF4 multifunctional rare earth nanoparticles
    Xinmin Cao
    School of Biomedical Engineering, Med X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200030, P R China
    Nanoscale 7:13404-9. 2015
    ..The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles in human glioblastoma U87MG and human non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells was evaluated, and their application for in vitro and in vivo tumor targeted imaging has also been demonstrated. ..
  2. pmc Synthesis of ligand-functionalized water-soluble [18F]YF3 nanoparticles for PET imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Stanford Molecular Imaging Program MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Nanoscale 5:3253-6. 2013
    ..18)F-labeled YF3 nanoparticles displayed high stability in mouse and human serum, and their application for mapping lymph nodes in live rats after local injection has also been demonstrated...
  3. doi request reprint Long-term-stable near-infrared polymer dots with ultrasmall size and narrow-band emission for imaging tumor vasculature in vivo
    Liqin Xiong
    School of Biomedical Engineering, Med X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, P R China
    Bioconjug Chem 26:817-21. 2015
    ..These results thus open new opportunities for the development of whole-body imaging of mice based on NIR polymer dots as fluorescent nanoprobes. ..
  4. pmc Efficient method for site-specific 18F-labeling of biomolecules using the rapid condensation reaction between 2-cyanobenzothiazole and cysteine
    Jongho Jeon
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 23:1902-8. 2012
    ..This strategy should provide a general approach for efficient and site-specific (18)F-labeling of various peptides and proteins for in vivo molecular imaging applications...
  5. pmc Self-luminescing BRET-FRET near-infrared dots for in vivo lymph-node mapping and tumour imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Commun 3:1193. 2012
    ..Our results demonstrate that these new nanoparticles are well suited to in vivo imaging applications such as lymph-node mapping and cancer imaging...
  6. doi request reprint Multimodal-luminescence core-shell nanocomposites for targeted imaging of tumor cells
    He Hu
    Department of Chemistry and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai, P R China
    Chemistry 15:3577-84. 2009
    ..These results show that the silica-coated upconverting nanophosphor (UCNP) nanocomposites prepared by our strategy can potentially be useful as multimodal bioimaging agents...
  7. pmc Redox-triggered self-assembly of gadolinium-based MRI probes for sensing reducing environment
    Deju Ye
    Molecular Imaging Program, Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, United States
    Bioconjug Chem 25:1526-36. 2014
    ..5 T. Probe 1 has high r₁ relaxivity (up to 34.2 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule at 0.5 T) upon activation, and also shows a high sensitivity and specificity for MR detection of thiol-containing biomolecules...