E Paul Zehr

Summary

Affiliation: University of Victoria
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. pmc Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling
    Tsuyoshi Nakajima
    Department of Integrative Physiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e76313. 2013
  2. doi Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: stroke and spinal cord injury
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 36:S214-31. 2011
  3. pmc Neural control of rhythmic arm cycling after stroke
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 108:891-905. 2012
  4. doi Persistence of locomotor-related interlimb reflex networks during walking after stroke
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Clin Neurophysiol 123:796-807. 2012
  5. doi The quadrupedal nature of human bipedal locomotion
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 37:102-8. 2009
  6. ncbi Training-induced adaptive plasticity in human somatosensory reflex pathways
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, V8W 3P1
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 101:1783-94. 2006
  7. pmc Neural regulation of rhythmic arm and leg movement is conserved across human locomotor tasks
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P1
    J Physiol 582:209-27. 2007
  8. ncbi Rhythmic leg cycling modulates forearm muscle H-reflex amplitude and corticospinal tract excitability
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Neurosci Lett 419:10-4. 2007
  9. doi From Claude Bernard to the Batcave and beyond: using Batman as a hook for physiology education
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, Division of Medical Sciences and Centre for Biomedical Research, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    Adv Physiol Educ 35:1-4. 2011
  10. ncbi Neural control of rhythmic human arm movement: phase dependence and task modulation of hoffmann reflexes in forearm muscles
    E Paul Zehr
    Motor Control Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P1, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 89:12-21. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications55

  1. pmc Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling
    Tsuyoshi Nakajima
    Department of Integrative Physiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e76313. 2013
    ..Overall our results support a conservation of neural control mechanisms between the arms and legs during locomotor behaviors in humans. ..
  2. doi Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: stroke and spinal cord injury
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 36:S214-31. 2011
    ..Thus, the grading of evidence for finding adverse events to support this conclusion is inadequate...
  3. pmc Neural control of rhythmic arm cycling after stroke
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 108:891-905. 2012
    ..The overall implication of this result is that the putative spinal contributions to rhythmic human arm movement remain accessible after stroke, which has translational implications for rehabilitation...
  4. doi Persistence of locomotor-related interlimb reflex networks during walking after stroke
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Clin Neurophysiol 123:796-807. 2012
    ..Here we examined muscles in both the more (MA) and less affected (LA) legs evoked by stimulation at the ankle and wrist during walking in chronic (>6 months post CVA) stroke...
  5. doi The quadrupedal nature of human bipedal locomotion
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 37:102-8. 2009
    ..These neural and biomechanical linkages could be exploited in rehabilitation after neurotrauma to allow the arms to give the legs a helping hand during gait rehabilitation...
  6. ncbi Training-induced adaptive plasticity in human somatosensory reflex pathways
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, V8W 3P1
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 101:1783-94. 2006
    ..Overall, the adaptive range for human muscle afferent reflexes appears bidirectional (that is, increased or reduced amplitudes) and on the order of 25-50%. The adaptive range for cutaneous pathways is currently uncertain...
  7. pmc Neural regulation of rhythmic arm and leg movement is conserved across human locomotor tasks
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P1
    J Physiol 582:209-27. 2007
    ..Overall, the results show strong correlation across tasks and support common neural patterning as the regulator of arm and leg movement during various rhythmic human movements...
  8. ncbi Rhythmic leg cycling modulates forearm muscle H-reflex amplitude and corticospinal tract excitability
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Neurosci Lett 419:10-4. 2007
    ....
  9. doi From Claude Bernard to the Batcave and beyond: using Batman as a hook for physiology education
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, Division of Medical Sciences and Centre for Biomedical Research, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    Adv Physiol Educ 35:1-4. 2011
    ..It is my goal that by sharing this experience I may stimulate like-minded readers to initiate their own similar projects and to also be emboldened to try and integrate popular culture touchstones in their own teaching practice...
  10. ncbi Neural control of rhythmic human arm movement: phase dependence and task modulation of hoffmann reflexes in forearm muscles
    E Paul Zehr
    Motor Control Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P1, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 89:12-21. 2003
    ..However, the inhibition of H-reflex amplitude induced by contralateral leg movement is absent in the arms. This may reflect the greater extent to which the arms can be used independently...
  11. ncbi Neural control of rhythmic human movement: the common core hypothesis
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, P O Box 3010 STN CSC, A358 MacLaurin Building, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, V8W 3P1
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 33:54-60. 2005
    ..This is subserved by presumed central pattern generators that regulate arm and leg movements during locomotion...
  12. ncbi Possible contributions of CPG activity to the control of rhythmic human arm movement
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3N4, Canada
    Can J Physiol Pharmacol 82:556-68. 2004
    ..Overall, the data support the hypothesis that CPG activity contributes to the neural control of rhythmic arm movement...
  13. ncbi Facilitation of soleus H-reflex amplitude evoked by cutaneous nerve stimulation at the wrist is not suppressed by rhythmic arm movement
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, V8W 3P1, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 159:382-8. 2004
    ..In conjunction with other data taken during walking, this suggests that the modulation of transmission through pathways from the SR nerve to the lumbosacral spinal cord is partly determined by rhythmic activity of both the arms and legs...
  14. ncbi Forward and backward arm cycling are regulated by equivalent neural mechanisms
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3015 STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P1 Canada
    J Neurophysiol 93:633-40. 2005
    ....
  15. ncbi Regulation of arm and leg movement during human locomotion
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, BC, Canada
    Neuroscientist 10:347-61. 2004
    ..Although the strength of coupling between the legs is stronger than that between the arms, arm and leg movements are similarly regulated by CPG activity and sensory feedback (e.g., reflex control) during locomotion...
  16. ncbi Modulation of cutaneous reflexes in arm muscles during walking: further evidence of similar control mechanisms for rhythmic human arm and leg movements
    E Paul Zehr
    Motor Control Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, PO Box 3015 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 149:260-6. 2003
    ..These results add to the evidence that, during cyclical movements of the arms and legs, similar neural mechanisms observed only during movement (e.g. central pattern generators) control reflex output...
  17. ncbi Enhancement of arm and leg locomotor coupling with augmented cutaneous feedback from the hand
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P1, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 98:1810-4. 2007
    ..We suggest that there is a measurable interaction between neural activity regulating arm and leg movement during locomotion that is specifically enhanced when cutaneous input from the hand is present...
  18. doi Rhythmic arm cycling modulates Hoffmann reflex excitability differentially in the ankle flexor and extensor muscles
    Katie Dragert
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, BC, Canada
    Neurosci Lett 450:235-8. 2009
    ..These findings may be pertinent to future investigation of rehabilitative therapies that involve facilitative modulation of ankle flexor motor responses...
  19. doi Suppression of soleus H-reflex amplitude is graded with frequency of rhythmic arm cycling
    Sandra R Hundza
    Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, PO Box 3015 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 193:297-306. 2009
    ..This suggests that achieving a threshold frequency of rhythmic arm movement may be important to incorporate in rehabilitation strategies to engage the appropriate interlimb neural pathways...
  20. pmc Amplification of interlimb reflexes evoked by stimulating the hand simultaneously with conditioning from the foot during locomotion
    Tsuyoshi Nakajima
    Department of Integrative Physiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6 20 2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Japan
    BMC Neurosci 14:28. 2013
    ..Stimuli were applied around the onset of rhythmic EMG bursts in VL corresponding to the onset of the power or leg extension phase...
  21. doi High-intensity unilateral dorsiflexor resistance training results in bilateral neuromuscular plasticity after stroke
    Katie Dragert
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, STN CSC, PO Box 3010, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 225:93-104. 2013
    ..We demonstrate residual plasticity existing many years post-stroke and suggest clinical application of the cross-education effect where training the more-affected limb is not initially possible...
  22. ncbi Context-dependent modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitudes during forward and backward leg cycling
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia
    Motor Control 13:368-86. 2009
    ..The general reflex regulation of limb trajectory was maintained between cycling directions in accordance with the task requirements of the movement direction...
  23. ncbi Neuromechanical considerations for incorporating rhythmic arm movement in the rehabilitation of walking
    Marc D Klimstra
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P1, Canada
    Chaos 19:026102. 2009
    ..However, changing the mechanical parameters could affect the role of afferent feedback altering neural control and the coupling to the lower limbs...
  24. doi Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses hyperactive soleus H-reflex amplitude after stroke
    Yasaman Barzi
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, RM D 017 MacLaurin Building, P O Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P1
    Clin Neurophysiol 119:1443-52. 2008
    ..Since a portion of the effect of arm cycling had previously been ascribed to subcortical and spinal mechanisms, we hypothesized that the suppressive effect of arm cycling would be partially maintained after stroke...
  25. doi Short-term plasticity of spinal reflex excitability induced by rhythmic arm movement
    Bahar Javan
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 99:2000-5. 2008
    ..The simplest explanation of this observation is plateau potential-like behavior of interneurons mediating presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferent transmission...
  26. doi Biomechanical outcomes and neural correlates of cutaneous reflexes evoked during rhythmic arm cycling
    Marc D Klimstra
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3015, STN CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    J Biomech 44:802-9. 2011
    ..Therefore, unlike the observations in the lower limbs, the mechanical responses during arm cycling are not clearly related to the functional context of the ongoing task...
  27. ncbi Muscle activation and cutaneous reflex modulation during rhythmic and discrete arm tasks in orthopaedic shoulder instability
    Sandra R Hundza
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, P O Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P1
    Exp Brain Res 179:339-51. 2007
    ..The differences in the background EMG and the cutaneous reflexes patterns in those with shoulder instabilities suggest that neural control is altered during rhythmic movement...
  28. doi Interlimb coupling from the arms to legs is differentially specified for populations of motor units comprising the compound H-reflex during "reduced" human locomotion
    Rinaldo A Mezzarane
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, PO Box 3010, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 208:157-68. 2011
    ....
  29. doi Differential modulation of reciprocal inhibition in ankle muscles during rhythmic arm cycling
    Katie Dragert
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, BC, Canada
    Neurosci Lett 534:269-73. 2013
    ..This may be due to differences in descending supraspinal inputs to ankle flexors vs. extensors, and could be related to functional requirements during locomotion...
  30. ncbi Cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic arm cycling are insensitive to asymmetrical changes in crank length
    Sandra R Hundza
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, PO Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 168:165-77. 2006
    ..We suggest that variations of arm cycling that primarily yield significant changes in the amplitude of muscle activity do not require significant task-specific change in neural control...
  31. ncbi Neural coupling between the arms and legs during rhythmic locomotor-like cycling movement
    Jaclyn E Balter
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, PO Box 3010, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, V8W 3P1
    J Neurophysiol 97:1809-18. 2007
    ..Our findings provide experimental support for the interaction of rhythmic arm and leg movement during human locomotion...
  32. doi Effect of afferent feedback and central motor commands on soleus H-reflex suppression during arm cycling
    S R Hundza
    Motion and Mobility Rehabilitation Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 108:3049-58. 2012
    ..Instead, it appears that central motor commands (supraspinal or spinal in origin) associated with frequency of arm cycling are relatively more dominant sources...
  33. ncbi Rhythmic arm cycling produces a non-specific signal that suppresses Soleus H-reflex amplitude in stationary legs
    Pamela M Loadman
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, PO Box 3015 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, Canada V8S 3W7
    Exp Brain Res 179:199-208. 2007
    ..We conclude that a general, rather than a specific, signal related to the command to produce rhythmic arm muscle activity mediates the suppression of Soleus H-reflex during arm cycling...
  34. doi Prior experience does not alter modulation of cutaneous reflexes during manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling
    Megan K Macgillivray
    School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 109:2345-53. 2013
    ..The differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks may be a result of mechanical differences (i.e., hand contact) between tasks...
  35. ncbi Earth-referenced handrail contact facilitates interlimb cutaneous reflexes during locomotion
    Erin V Lamont
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 98:433-42. 2007
    ..Therefore, holding a rail may cause global changes in reflex thresholds across the body that may have widespread functional relevance for assisting in the maintenance of postural stability during locomotion...
  36. ncbi A sigmoid function is the best fit for the ascending limb of the Hoffmann reflex recruitment curve
    Marc Klimstra
    School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 186:93-105. 2008
    ..Therefore, the sigmoid function should be considered an acceptable and preferable analytical tool for H-reflex recruitment curves obtained with reference to stimulation current or M-wave amplitude...
  37. doi Rhythmic arm cycling differentially modulates stretch and H-reflex amplitudes in soleus muscle
    Andres F Palomino
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, PO Box 3010 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 214:529-37. 2011
    ..We suggest this indicates that stretch reflexes are less sensitive to conditioning by rhythmic arm movement, as compared to H-reflexes, due to the relative insensitivity to Ia presynaptic inhibition...
  38. doi Phase-dependent modulation of soleus H-reflex amplitude induced by rhythmic arm cycling
    Geoff C de Ruiter
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
    Neurosci Lett 475:7-11. 2010
    ..The phasic modulation was more pronounced during bilateral movement, however aspects of the neural control driving this modulation were also present during ipsilateral and contralateral movement...
  39. ncbi Postactivation potentiation of force is independent of h-reflex excitability
    Matthew J Hodgson
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory and the School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC
    Int J Sports Physiol Perform 3:219-31. 2008
    ..The contractile history of muscle can potentiate electrically evoked force production. A link to voluntary force production, related in part to an increase in reflex excitability, has been suggested...
  40. doi Bilateral neuromuscular plasticity from unilateral training of the ankle dorsiflexors
    Katie Dragert
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, P O Box 3010 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P1, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 208:217-27. 2011
    ..It is possible that the ability to strengthen the ankle dorsiflexors bilaterally could be applied in post-stroke rehabilitation, where ankle flexor weakness could be counteracted via dorsiflexor training in the less-affected limb...
  41. doi Scientific insight that will guide future study of visual regulation of human locomotion - a testament to the contribution of Dr. Aftab Patla
    E Paul Zehr
    Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 36:107-8. 2008
  42. ncbi Coordinated interlimb compensatory responses to electrical stimulation of cutaneous nerves in the hand and foot during walking
    Carlos Haridas
    Centre for Neuroscience, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 90:2850-61. 2003
    ....
  43. ncbi Task-specific modulation of cutaneous reflexes expressed at functionally relevant gait cycle phases during level and incline walking and stair climbing
    Erin V Lamont
    Centre for Neuroscience, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 173:185-92. 2006
    ..Therefore, there may be considerable overlap in the neural control of different forms of locomotion...
  44. ncbi Context-dependent modulation of interlimb cutaneous reflexes in arm muscles as a function of stability threat during walking
    Carlos Haridas
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Sensory Motor Research Laboratory, 2 64 Corbett Hall, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G4
    J Neurophysiol 96:3096-103. 2006
    ..e., the context of the behavior), thereby suggesting that these reflexes serve a functional link between the legs and arms during locomotion...
  45. ncbi Ankle position and voluntary contraction alter maximal M waves in soleus and tibialis anterior
    Alain Frigon
    Centre for Research in Neurological Sciences, Department of Physiology, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Muscle Nerve 35:756-66. 2007
    ..As such, during experimental studies CMAPs evoked at a given joint angle and contraction level should be normalized to M(max) recorded at similar joint angle and contraction strength...
  46. ncbi Effect of rhythmic arm movement on reflexes in the legs: modulation of soleus H-reflexes and somatosensory conditioning
    Alain Frigon
    Neural Control of Human Movement Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA
    J Neurophysiol 91:1516-23. 2004
    ..It is proposed that activation of these networks may assist in reflex linkages between the arms and legs during locomotor tasks...
  47. ncbi Modulation of cutaneous reflexes in human upper limb muscles during arm cycling is independent of activity in the contralateral arm
    Timothy J Carroll
    Health and Sports Science, School of Medical Sciences, The University of New South Wales, LG02M Wallace Wurth Building, 2052, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 161:133-44. 2005
    ..This suggests a loose connection between the CPGs for each arm that regulate muscle activity and reflex amplitude during rhythmic movement...
  48. ncbi Limits to fast-conducting somatosensory feedback in movement control
    John D Brooke
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 34:22-8. 2006
    ..This review addresses the limits of somatosensory feedback control of human movement and proposes that dynamic modification of feedback inflow requires an increased reliance on internal models for movement control...
  49. ncbi Postural uncertainty leads to dynamic control of cutaneous reflexes from the foot during human walking
    Carlos Haridas
    Centre for Neuroscience, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Brain Res 1062:48-62. 2005
    ..We argue that the specific adaptation of cutaneous reflexes observed with SP nerve stimulation supports the hypothesis that cutaneous reflexes from the foot contribute to the maintenance of stability during walking...
  50. ncbi Corticospinal excitability is lower during rhythmic arm movement than during tonic contraction
    Timothy J Carroll
    Health and Sports Science, School of Medical Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    J Neurophysiol 95:914-21. 2006
    ..Our results are consistent with the idea that subcortical regions contribute to the control of rhythmic arm movements despite highly developed corticospinal projections to the human upper limb...
  51. ncbi Adaptation of cutaneous stumble correction when tripping is part of the locomotor environment
    Carlos Haridas
    Centre for Neuroscience, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G G4, Canada
    J Neurophysiol 99:2789-97. 2008
    ..This task-related gating of cutaneous reflexes was not generalized to all muscles, thus suggesting a functional role in the maintenance of stability during locomotion...
  52. ncbi Diurnal changes in the amplitude of the Hoffmann reflex in the human soleus but not in the flexor carpi radialis muscle
    Olle Lagerquist
    Human Neurophysiology Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, E439 Van Vliet Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H9, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 170:1-6. 2006
    ..Diurnal fluctuation in the human soleus H-reflex amplitude must be considered when interpreting H-reflex data, especially when a repeated measures design spanning several days is utilized...
  53. ncbi Increased spinal reflex excitability is not associated with neural plasticity underlying the cross-education effect
    Olle Lagerquist
    Human Neurophysiology Laboratory, Centre for Neuroscience, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
    J Appl Physiol 100:83-90. 2006
    ..We conclude that the cross-education effect of strength training may be due to supraspinal to a greater extent than spinal mechanisms...
  54. ncbi Recumbent stepping has similar but simpler neural control compared to walking
    Rebecca H Stoloff
    Department of Movement Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2214, USA
    Exp Brain Res 178:427-38. 2007
    ..Individuals with neurological impairments may be able to improve walking ability from recumbent stepping practice given similarities in neural control between the two tasks...