Judy Village

Summary

Affiliation: University of British Columbia
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Assessing whole body vibration exposure for use in epidemiological studies of back injuries: measurements, observations and self-reports
    J Village
    School of Environmental Health, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia, 3rd Floor, Library Processing Center, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada
    Ergonomics 55:415-24. 2012
  2. doi request reprint Assessing attitudes, beliefs and readiness for musculoskeletal injury prevention in the construction industry
    Judy Village
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
    Appl Ergon 41:771-8. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Quantifying tasks, ergonomic exposures and injury rates among school custodial workers
    J Village
    School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Ergonomics 52:723-34. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of selected ergonomic assessment tools for use in providing job accommodation for people with inflammatory arthritis
    Judy Village
    University of British Columbia School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Work 31:145-57. 2008
  5. doi request reprint Development and evaluation of an observational Back-Exposure Sampling Tool (Back-EST) for work-related back injury risk factors
    J Village
    School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Faculty of Graduate Studies, 3rd Floor, Library Processing Center, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3
    Appl Ergon 40:538-44. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Electromyography as a measure of peak and cumulative workload in intermediate care and its relationship to musculoskeletal injury: an exploratory ergonomic study
    J Village
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Appl Ergon 36:609-18. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Measuring low back injury risk factors in challenging work environments: an evaluation of cost and feasibility
    Catherine Trask
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Am J Ind Med 50:687-96. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Workload as a determinant of staff injury in intermediate care
    Marcy Cohen
    Hospital Employees Union, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Int J Occup Environ Health 10:375-83. 2004
  9. doi request reprint Injury risk associated with physical demands and school environment characteristics among a cohort of custodial workers
    Mieke Koehoorn
    School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Ergonomics 54:767-75. 2011
  10. doi request reprint Back injury trajectories in heavy industries: defining outcomes for epidemiological research
    Mieke Koehoorn
    School of Population and Public Health, School of Environmental Health, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    J Occup Environ Med 52:908-12. 2010

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. doi request reprint Assessing whole body vibration exposure for use in epidemiological studies of back injuries: measurements, observations and self-reports
    J Village
    School of Environmental Health, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia, 3rd Floor, Library Processing Center, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada
    Ergonomics 55:415-24. 2012
    ..70 (0.37). The final three regression models retained only 2 or 3 of the 34 variables (driving speed (<20 km/h and/or 20-40 km/h) and industry and/or vehicle type and explained up to 60% of the variance (R² = 0.26-0.6)...
  2. doi request reprint Assessing attitudes, beliefs and readiness for musculoskeletal injury prevention in the construction industry
    Judy Village
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
    Appl Ergon 41:771-8. 2010
    ..This information can be used to target ergonomics interventions in this industry...
  3. doi request reprint Quantifying tasks, ergonomic exposures and injury rates among school custodial workers
    J Village
    School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Ergonomics 52:723-34. 2009
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of selected ergonomic assessment tools for use in providing job accommodation for people with inflammatory arthritis
    Judy Village
    University of British Columbia School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Work 31:145-57. 2008
    ..Against these criteria, it appears that there is a lack of appropriate ergonomic assessment tools for use in people with IA...
  5. doi request reprint Development and evaluation of an observational Back-Exposure Sampling Tool (Back-EST) for work-related back injury risk factors
    J Village
    School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Faculty of Graduate Studies, 3rd Floor, Library Processing Center, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3
    Appl Ergon 40:538-44. 2009
    ..9 for >60 degrees flexion, but only 0.11-0.19 for lateral bending and trunk flexion less than 45 degrees . When lower flexion angles were collapsed to include trunk extension, correlations increased to >0.5...
  6. ncbi request reprint Electromyography as a measure of peak and cumulative workload in intermediate care and its relationship to musculoskeletal injury: an exploratory ergonomic study
    J Village
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Appl Ergon 36:609-18. 2005
    ..01). Facilities with low injury rates provided significantly more CAs (p < 0.01) to meet resident needs, and subsequently CAs performed fewer tasks, resulting in less peak and cumulative spinal loading over the day...
  7. ncbi request reprint Measuring low back injury risk factors in challenging work environments: an evaluation of cost and feasibility
    Catherine Trask
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Am J Ind Med 50:687-96. 2007
    ..Measuring low back injury risk factors in field research presents challenges not encountered in laboratory environments...
  8. ncbi request reprint Workload as a determinant of staff injury in intermediate care
    Marcy Cohen
    Hospital Employees Union, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Int J Occup Environ Health 10:375-83. 2004
    ..The differences in staffing reflected differences in how organizations prioritized and allocated resources. Thus, workload is an important determinant of injuries and increased staffing levels correlate with decreased injuries...
  9. doi request reprint Injury risk associated with physical demands and school environment characteristics among a cohort of custodial workers
    Mieke Koehoorn
    School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Ergonomics 54:767-75. 2011
    ..The findings help schools to target interventions to reduce the physical demands associated with injuries and to design school environments to reduce exposures...
  10. doi request reprint Back injury trajectories in heavy industries: defining outcomes for epidemiological research
    Mieke Koehoorn
    School of Population and Public Health, School of Environmental Health, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    J Occup Environ Med 52:908-12. 2010
    ..To propose an incidence definition of back injury for epidemiologic studies using health care contacts...
  11. doi request reprint How long is long enough? Evaluating sampling durations for low back EMG assessment
    Catherine M Trask
    University of British Columbia, School of Environmental Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Occup Environ Hyg 5:664-70. 2008
    ..Depending on the purpose of measurement and the detail required, 4 hr or even 2 hr appears to be long enough to reasonably estimate full-shift exposure...
  12. doi request reprint Measuring posture for epidemiology: comparing inclinometry, observations and self-reports
    Kay Teschke
    School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Ergonomics 52:1067-78. 2009
    ..A combination of inclinometry and observations would be an ideal option to provide both depth and breadth of data on postures and other physical exposures for epidemiological research...
  13. doi request reprint The Ergonomic Assessment Tool for Arthritis: development and pilot testing
    Catherine L Backman
    University of British Columbia and Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Arthritis Rheum 59:1495-503. 2008
    ..Our objectives were to design and pilot test an ergonomic assessment tool for people with IA and to propose ergonomic modifications to prevent work loss and maintain at-work productivity...
  14. ncbi request reprint Work organization and musculoskeletal injuries among a cohort of health care workers
    Mieke Koehoorn
    School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Scand J Work Environ Health 32:285-93. 2006
    ..This study investigated the relationship between work-organization factors (job control, job demands, and workload measures) and the risk of lower-body musculoskeletal injury among health care workers...
  15. ncbi request reprint Factors associated with staff injuries in intermediate care facilities in British Columbia, Canada
    Annalee Yassi
    Occupational Health and Safety Agency for Healthcare, and Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia
    Nurs Res 53:87-98. 2004
    ..Large variations in staff injury rates across intermediate care facilities suggest that injuries may be driven by facility-specific work environment factors...