Michael Schillaci

Summary

Affiliation: University of Toronto
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Technical note: comparison of the Maresh reference data with the who international standard for normal growth in healthy children
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4
    Am J Phys Anthropol 147:493-8. 2012
  2. doi request reprint Infant and juvenile growth in ancestral Pueblo Indians
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 145:318-26. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Lead levels in long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) hair from Singapore
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, M1C 1A4, Canada
    Primates 52:163-70. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Latitudinal variation in cranial dimorphism in Macaca fascicularis
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada
    Am J Primatol 72:152-60. 2010
  5. pmc The impact of changing medicaid enrollments on New Mexico's Immunization Program
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    PLoS ONE 3:e3953. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Estimating the probability that the sample mean is within a desired fraction of the standard deviation of the true mean
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4, Canada
    J Hum Evol 56:134-8. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Characterizing the threat to the blood supply associated with nonoccupational exposure to emerging simian retroviruses
    Michael Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Transfusion 48:398-401. 2008
  8. pmc Sexual selection and the evolution of brain size in primates
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    PLoS ONE 1:e62. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Exposure to human respiratory viruses among urban performing monkeys in Indonesia
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 75:716-9. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint The effects of hybridization on growth allometry and craniofacial form in Sulawesi macaques
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada
    J Hum Evol 49:335-69. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. doi request reprint Technical note: comparison of the Maresh reference data with the who international standard for normal growth in healthy children
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4
    Am J Phys Anthropol 147:493-8. 2012
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Infant and juvenile growth in ancestral Pueblo Indians
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 145:318-26. 2011
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Lead levels in long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) hair from Singapore
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, M1C 1A4, Canada
    Primates 52:163-70. 2011
    ..Future research examining the efficacy of primates as sentinels of lead exposure should include monitoring of environmental lead levels, and comparison of hair lead levels with levels measured in blood samples...
  4. doi request reprint Latitudinal variation in cranial dimorphism in Macaca fascicularis
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada
    Am J Primatol 72:152-60. 2010
    ..Such research should be comparative, and incorporate multiple geographically separated populations with disparate environmental settings...
  5. pmc The impact of changing medicaid enrollments on New Mexico's Immunization Program
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    PLoS ONE 3:e3953. 2008
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Estimating the probability that the sample mean is within a desired fraction of the standard deviation of the true mean
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4, Canada
    J Hum Evol 56:134-8. 2009
    ..Given our results, we suggest that sample estimates of the population mean can be reasonable and meaningful even when based on small, and perhaps even very small, sample sizes...
  7. ncbi request reprint Characterizing the threat to the blood supply associated with nonoccupational exposure to emerging simian retroviruses
    Michael Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Transfusion 48:398-401. 2008
  8. pmc Sexual selection and the evolution of brain size in primates
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    PLoS ONE 1:e62. 2006
    ..The present study shows that the largest relative brain sizes among primate species are associated with monogamous mating systems, suggesting primate monogamy may require greater social acuity and abilities of deception...
  9. ncbi request reprint Exposure to human respiratory viruses among urban performing monkeys in Indonesia
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 75:716-9. 2006
    ..Given the level of overseas travel, this potential threat is not confined solely to Asia...
  10. ncbi request reprint The effects of hybridization on growth allometry and craniofacial form in Sulawesi macaques
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada
    J Hum Evol 49:335-69. 2005
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Prevalence of enzootic simian viruses among urban performance monkeys in Indonesia
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Trop Med Int Health 10:1305-14. 2005
    ..No evidence of infection with simian immunodeficiency virus was detected in these macaques. These results suggest that urban performance monkeys are a reservoir for enzootic simian viruses known to be capable of infecting humans...
  12. ncbi request reprint Craniometric variation and population history of the prehistoric Tewa
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Scarborough, Ontario M1C 1A4, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 126:404-12. 2005
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Human cranial diversity and evidence for an ancient lineage of modern humans
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada
    J Hum Evol 54:814-26. 2008
    ..The principal findings of the study, therefore, lend support to the notion of an early dispersal from Africa by a more ancient lineage of modern human prior to 50 ka, perhaps as early as OIS 5 times (76-100 ka)...
  14. pmc Immunization coverage and Medicaid managed care in New Mexico: a multimethod assessment
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Ann Fam Med 2:13-21. 2004
    ..We wanted to examine the association between Medicaid managed care (MMC) and changing immunization coverage in New Mexico, a predominantly rural, poor, and multiethnic state...
  15. doi request reprint Further analysis of the population history of ancient Egyptians
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4
    Am J Phys Anthropol 139:235-43. 2009
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Thoracic radiography of pet macaques in Sulawesi, Indonesia
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON, Canada
    J Med Primatol 37:141-5. 2008
    ..These largely negative findings may be in part a consequence of image quality which seems to be influenced by power output and incomplete inspiration during film exposure...
  17. doi request reprint Greater sciatic notch as a sex indicator in juveniles
    Dejana Vlak
    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 137:309-15. 2008
    ....
  18. doi request reprint Brief communication: Sexual dimorphism of the juvenile basicranium
    Adam Veroni
    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:147-51. 2010
    ..8% of time. Obtained accuracy, however, was lower than reported by previous studies of adult samples. We suggest that this discrepancy is a result of population variability rather than age...
  19. ncbi request reprint Postmarital residence and biological variation at Pueblo Bonito
    Michael A Schillaci
    Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 120:1-15. 2003
    ..These findings are inconsistent with the notion that the female-based system of matrilocal residence with matrilineal descent observed among the present-day Western Pueblos was the ancestral Anasazi condition...
  20. ncbi request reprint Phenotypic approaches for understanding patterns of intracemetery biological variation
    Christopher M Stojanowski
    Center for Bioarchaeological Research, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol . 2006
    ..Use of phenotypic data as a genotypic proxy is theoretically sound, even at small scales of analysis...
  21. pmc Primate-to-human retroviral transmission in Asia
    Lisa Jones-Engel
    University of Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:1028-35. 2005
    ..This study raises concerns that persons who work at or live around monkey temples are at risk for infection with SFV...
  22. pmc Diverse contexts of zoonotic transmission of simian foamy viruses in Asia
    Lisa Jones-Engel
    Division of International Programs, National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 14:1200-8. 2008
    ..Thus, SFV infections are likely to be prevalent among persons who live or work near nonhuman primates in Asia...
  23. pmc Sensitive assays for simian foamy viruses reveal a high prevalence of infection in commensal, free-ranging Asian monkeys
    Lisa Jones-Engel
    Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Virol 81:7330-7. 2007
    ..These assays should also prove useful for large-scale analysis of the prevalence of FV infections in human populations in Asia that are commensal with free-ranging NHPs...
  24. ncbi request reprint Considering human-primate transmission of measles virus through the prism of risk analysis
    Lisa Jones-Engel
    Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Am J Primatol 68:868-79. 2006
    ..Here the contrasting seroprevalences of the two sites are analyzed using risk analysis. These case studies show how risk analysis can be used to approach the phenomenon of cross-species pathogen transmission...
  25. pmc Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia
    Gregory A Engel
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 8:789-95. 2002
    ..Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B...