E G Schellenberg

Summary

Affiliation: University of Toronto
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Listeners remember music they like
    Stephanie M Stalinski
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 39:700-16. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Music training and emotion comprehension in childhood
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Emotion 12:887-91. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Examining the association between music lessons and intelligence
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    University of Toronto Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Br J Psychol 102:283-302. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint Music listening and cognitive abilities in 10- and 11-year-olds: the blur effect
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, Canada L5L 1C6
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1060:202-9. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Children's implicit knowledge of harmony in Western music
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Dev Sci 8:551-66. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Music lessons enhance IQ
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Psychol Sci 15:511-4. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Good pitch memory is widespread
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Psychol Sci 14:262-6. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Culture-general and culture-specific factors in the discrimination of melodies
    E G Schellenberg
    University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    J Exp Child Psychol 74:107-27. 1999
  9. ncbi request reprint Expectancy in melody: tests of children and adults
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Gen 131:511-37. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Name that tune: identifying popular recordings from brief excerpts
    E G Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 6:641-6. 1999

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. doi request reprint Listeners remember music they like
    Stephanie M Stalinski
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 39:700-16. 2013
    ..The results implicate a direct association between liking and recognition. Considered jointly with previous findings, it is now clear that listeners tend to like music that they remember and to remember music that they like...
  2. doi request reprint Music training and emotion comprehension in childhood
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Emotion 12:887-91. 2012
    ..Group differences in TEC scores disappeared, however, when IQ scores were held constant. These findings suggest that nonmusical associations with music training are limited to measures of intellectual ability and their correlates...
  3. doi request reprint Examining the association between music lessons and intelligence
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    University of Toronto Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Br J Psychol 102:283-302. 2011
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Music listening and cognitive abilities in 10- and 11-year-olds: the blur effect
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, Canada L5L 1C6
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1060:202-9. 2005
    ..These findings are consistent with the view that positive benefits of music listening on cognitive abilities are most likely to be evident when the music is enjoyed by the listener...
  5. ncbi request reprint Children's implicit knowledge of harmony in Western music
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Dev Sci 8:551-66. 2005
    ..Performance was faster (Experiments 1, 2 and 3) and more accurate (Experiment 3) when the target was the tonic chord. The findings confirm that children have implicit knowledge of syntactic functions that typify Western harmony...
  6. ncbi request reprint Music lessons enhance IQ
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Psychol Sci 15:511-4. 2004
    ..Unexpectedly, children in the drama group exhibited substantial pre- to post-test improvements in adaptive social behavior that were not evident in the music groups...
  7. ncbi request reprint Good pitch memory is widespread
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Psychol Sci 14:262-6. 2003
    ..These findings reveal that ordinary listeners retain fine-grained information about pitch level over extended periods. Adults' reportedly poor memory for pitch is likely to be a by-product of their inability to name isolated pitches...
  8. ncbi request reprint Culture-general and culture-specific factors in the discrimination of melodies
    E G Schellenberg
    University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    J Exp Child Psychol 74:107-27. 1999
    ..Thus, increasing musical exposure seems to attenuate the effects of culture-general factors such as pattern redundancy while amplifying the influence of culture-specific factors...
  9. ncbi request reprint Expectancy in melody: tests of children and adults
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Gen 131:511-37. 2002
    ..Older listeners also expected reversals of pitch direction, specifically for tones that changed direction after a disruption of proximity and for tones that formed symmetric patterns...
  10. ncbi request reprint Name that tune: identifying popular recordings from brief excerpts
    E G Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 6:641-6. 1999
    ..In sum, successful identification required the presence of dynamic, high-frequency spectral information...
  11. ncbi request reprint Music and nonmusical abilities
    E G Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 930:355-71. 2001
    ..Several studies have reported positive associations between formal music lessons and abilities in nonmusical (e.g., linguistic, mathematical, and spatial) domains. Nonetheless, compelling evidence for a causal link remains elusive...
  12. ncbi request reprint Expectancy in melody: tests of the implication-realization model
    E G Schellenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Cognition 58:75-125. 1996
    ..The consistency that was found across experimental tasks, musical styles, and listeners raises the possibility, however, that the revised version of the model may withstand the original model's claims of universality...
  13. ncbi request reprint Infants' and adults' perception of scale structure
    S E Trehub
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 25:965-75. 1999
    ..Adults performed better on the familiar (major) unequal-step scale and equally poorly on both unfamiliar scales (Experiments 3 and 4). These findings are indicative of an inherent processing bias favoring unequal-step scales...
  14. ncbi request reprint Decoding speech prosody: do music lessons help?
    William Forde Thompson
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Emotion 4:46-64. 2004
    ..The keyboard group performed equivalently to the drama group and better than the no-lessons group at identifying anger or fear...
  15. ncbi request reprint Perceiving prosody in speech. Effects of music lessons
    William Forde Thompson
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 999:530-2. 2003
    ..In both cases, musical training was associated with superior performance, indicating an enhanced ability to extract prosodic information from spoken phrases...
  16. pmc Perception of strong-meter and weak-meter rhythms in children with spina bifida meningomyelocele
    Talar Hopyan
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    J Int Neuropsychol Soc 15:521-8. 2009
    ..The attenuated strong-meter advantage in children with SBM shows that their rhythm deficits occur at the level of both perception and action, and may represent a central processing disruption of the brain mechanisms for rhythm...
  17. doi request reprint Developmental changes in the perception of pitch contour: distinguishing up from down
    Stephanie M Stalinski
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
    J Acoust Soc Am 124:1759-63. 2008
    ..1 semitone). For all age groups, performance accuracy decreased as the size of the shift decreased. Performance improved from 5 to 8 years of age, reaching adult levels at 8 years...
  18. ncbi request reprint Song recognition by children and adolescents with cochlear implants
    Tara Vongpaisal
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    J Speech Lang Hear Res 49:1091-103. 2006
    ..To assess song recognition and pitch perception in prelingually deaf individuals with cochlear implants (CIs)...
  19. ncbi request reprint Arousal, mood, and the Mozart effect
    W F Thompson
    Department of Psychology, Atkinson College, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Psychol Sci 12:248-51. 2001
    ..Moreover, when such differences were held constant by statistical means, the Mozart effect disappeared. These findings provide compelling evidence that the Mozart effect is an artifact of arousal and mood...
  20. ncbi request reprint Infants' memory for musical performances
    Anna Volkova
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada
    Dev Sci 9:583-9. 2006
    ..We conclude that infants' memory for musical performances is enhanced by the ecological validity of the materials. Moreover, infants' pitch preferences are influenced by their previous exposure and by the nature of the music...
  21. ncbi request reprint Liking and memory for musical stimuli as a function of exposure
    Karl K Szpunar
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 30:370-81. 2004
    ..In general, recognition improved as a function of previous exposure for focused listeners, but the effect was attenuated or absent for incidental listeners...
  22. doi request reprint Children With Cochlear implants recognize their mother's voice
    Tara Vongpaisal
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Ear Hear 31:555-66. 2010
    ..We predicted that the use of a highly familiar voice, full sentences, and a game-like task with feedback would lead to higher performance levels than those achieved in previous studies of talker identification in CI users...
  23. doi request reprint Music, language and cognition: unresolved issues
    E Glenn Schellenberg
    Trends Cogn Sci 12:45-6. 2008
  24. ncbi request reprint Music recognition by Japanese children with cochlear implants
    Takayuki Nakata
    Department of Child Studies, Nagasaki Junshin Catholic University, Nagasaki, Japan
    J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci 24:29-32. 2005
    ..Children gave favorable appraisals of the music even when they were unable to recognize it. Further research is needed to find means of enhancing cochlear implants users' perception and appreciation of music...
  25. ncbi request reprint Implicit learning in children and adults with Williams syndrome
    Audrey J Don
    Children s Seashore House
    Dev Neuropsychol 23:201-25. 2003
    ..Performance advantages for the comparison group were no longer significant when group differences in working memory or nonverbal intelligence were held constant...