Ipek Oruc

Summary

Affiliation: University of British Columbia
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. pmc Noise masking reveals channels for second-order letters
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 3008 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Vision Res 46:1493-506. 2006
  2. doi request reprint The effect of attention on the illusory capture of motion in bimodal stimuli
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Brain Res 1242:200-8. 2008
  3. pmc Scale dependence and channel switching in letter identification
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Vis 9:4.1-19. 2009
  4. doi request reprint The role of skin texture and facial shape in representations of age and identity
    Michelle Lai
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Cortex 49:252-65. 2013
  5. doi request reprint Bootstrap analysis of the single subject with event related potentials
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Cogn Neuropsychol 28:322-37. 2011
  6. doi request reprint A novel face aftereffect based on recognition contrast thresholds
    Ipek Oruc
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Vision Res 50:1845-54. 2010
  7. doi request reprint Critical frequencies in the perception of letters, faces, and novel shapes: evidence for limited scale invariance for faces
    Ipek Oruc
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Vis 10:20. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Facial age after-effects show partial identity invariance and transfer from hands to faces
    Michelle Lai
    Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Cortex 48:477-86. 2012
  9. doi request reprint Center-surround organization of face-space: evidence from contrast-based face-priming
    Shabnam Rostamirad
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Neuroreport 20:1177-82. 2009
  10. pmc Gender in facial representations: a contrast-based study of adaptation within and between the sexes
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    PLoS ONE 6:e16251. 2011

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Noise masking reveals channels for second-order letters
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 3008 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Vision Res 46:1493-506. 2006
    ..Unlike the nonlinear dependence found for first-order letters (implying scale-dependent processing), for second-order letters the channel frequency is half the letter texture stroke frequency (suggesting scale-invariant processing)...
  2. doi request reprint The effect of attention on the illusory capture of motion in bimodal stimuli
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Brain Res 1242:200-8. 2008
    ..We found that attention does have an effect on how the motion signals are combined across modalities, but only when the susceptibility for capture between the two signals are comparable...
  3. pmc Scale dependence and channel switching in letter identification
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Vis 9:4.1-19. 2009
    ....
  4. doi request reprint The role of skin texture and facial shape in representations of age and identity
    Michelle Lai
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Cortex 49:252-65. 2013
    ..The lack of cross-component adaptation transfer suggests independent encoding of shape and texture, at least for age representations...
  5. doi request reprint Bootstrap analysis of the single subject with event related potentials
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Cogn Neuropsychol 28:322-37. 2011
    ....
  6. doi request reprint A novel face aftereffect based on recognition contrast thresholds
    Ipek Oruc
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Vision Res 50:1845-54. 2010
    ..The findings indicate greater complexity to adaptation, with facilitation, suppression, lateral inhibition of unadapted representations, and additional perceptual factors at long durations...
  7. doi request reprint Critical frequencies in the perception of letters, faces, and novel shapes: evidence for limited scale invariance for faces
    Ipek Oruc
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Vis 10:20. 2010
    ..This suggests an important difference between the processing of faces and other objects that may reflect their unique status as stimuli...
  8. doi request reprint Facial age after-effects show partial identity invariance and transfer from hands to faces
    Michelle Lai
    Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Cortex 48:477-86. 2012
    ..These findings confirm that face adaptation has components that cannot be explained by low-level image-based effects but involve high-level representations that may be influenced by related visual semantic information...
  9. doi request reprint Center-surround organization of face-space: evidence from contrast-based face-priming
    Shabnam Rostamirad
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Neuroreport 20:1177-82. 2009
    ..This suggests a center-surround organization in which facial representations close to the priming stimulus are more suppressed than those that are distant...
  10. pmc Gender in facial representations: a contrast-based study of adaptation within and between the sexes
    Ipek Oruc
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    PLoS ONE 6:e16251. 2011
    ..Our results suggest that male and female faces likely occupy the same face space, allowing transfer of aftereffects between the genders, but that there are special properties that emerge along gender-defining dimensions of this space...
  11. pmc Adaptation improves discrimination of face identity
    Ipek Oruc
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Department of Medicine Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Proc Biol Sci 278:2591-7. 2011
    ..These results indicate a form of gain control to heighten perceptual sensitivity in the vicinity of a currently viewed face, analogous to forms of adaptive gain control at lower levels of the visual system...
  12. doi request reprint The anatomic basis of the right face-selective N170 IN acquired prosopagnosia: a combined ERP/fMRI study
    Kirsten A Dalrymple
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Neuropsychologia 49:2553-63. 2011
    ..We conclude that the face-selective N170 in prosopagnosia requires residual function of at least two components of the core face-processing network...
  13. doi request reprint It doesn't matter how you feel. The facial identity aftereffect is invariant to changes in facial expression
    Christopher J Fox
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Vis 8:11.1-13. 2008
    ..We conclude that, in contrast to the significant identity-dependent component seen in representations of expression, representations of facial identity are independent of variations in expression...
  14. pmc Factors contributing to the adaptation aftereffects of facial expression
    Andrea Butler
    Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada
    Brain Res 1191:116-26. 2008
    ..We conclude that facial expression aftereffects are not due to local adaptation to image elements but due to high-level adaptation of neural representations that involve both facial features and facial configuration...