A Kingstone

Summary

Affiliation: University of British Columbia
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Reflexive joint attention depends on lateralized cortical connections
    A Kingstone
    2136 West Mall, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B C V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Psychol Sci 11:159-66. 2000
  2. doi request reprint Taking a real look at social attention
    Alan Kingstone
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 19:52-6. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint The eyes have it!: an fMRI investigation
    Alan Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Cogn 55:269-71. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Cognitive Ethology: a new approach for studying human cognition
    Alan Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada
    Br J Psychol 99:317-40. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Orienting attention in aging and Parkinson's disease: distinguishing modes of control
    Alan Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Clin Exp Neuropsychol 24:951-67. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of return is composed of attentional and oculomotor processes
    A Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Percept Psychophys 61:1046-54. 1999
  7. pmc Monsters are people too
    J Levy
    Lord Byng Secondary School, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Biol Lett 9:20120850. 2013
  8. ncbi request reprint Cued shifts of attention and memory encoding in partial report: a dual-task approach
    B Giesbrecht
    Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
    Q J Exp Psychol A 54:695-725. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of return in location- and identity-based choice decision tasks
    J Pratt
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Percept Psychophys 59:964-71. 1997
  10. ncbi request reprint Cognitive Ethology and exploring attention in real-world scenes
    Daniel Smilek
    Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada
    Brain Res 1080:101-19. 2006

Detail Information

Publications68

  1. ncbi request reprint Reflexive joint attention depends on lateralized cortical connections
    A Kingstone
    2136 West Mall, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B C V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Psychol Sci 11:159-66. 2000
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Taking a real look at social attention
    Alan Kingstone
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 19:52-6. 2009
    ..In doing so one can maintain the link between lab research and the phenomena it seeks to understand. Instances of lab failures that are offset by a cognitive ethology approach are presented and discussed...
  3. ncbi request reprint The eyes have it!: an fMRI investigation
    Alan Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Cogn 55:269-71. 2004
    ..However, the neural systems subserving the two forms of orienting were not equivalent-with the STS being engaged exceptionally when the fixation stimulus was perceived as eyes...
  4. ncbi request reprint Cognitive Ethology: a new approach for studying human cognition
    Alan Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada
    Br J Psychol 99:317-40. 2008
    ..We discuss how Cognitive Ethology can complement lab-based investigations, and we show how its levels of description and explanation are distinct from what is typically employed in lab-based research...
  5. ncbi request reprint Orienting attention in aging and Parkinson's disease: distinguishing modes of control
    Alan Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Clin Exp Neuropsychol 24:951-67. 2002
    ..Together our study supports the thesis that it is crucial to isolate and investigate different modes of attentional control...
  6. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of return is composed of attentional and oculomotor processes
    A Kingstone
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Percept Psychophys 61:1046-54. 1999
    ..Together, the data indicate that IOR is composed of both an oculomotor component and an attentional component...
  7. pmc Monsters are people too
    J Levy
    Lord Byng Secondary School, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Biol Lett 9:20120850. 2013
    ..These findings demonstrate that the eyes, and not the middle of the head, are being targeted by the oculomotor system...
  8. ncbi request reprint Cued shifts of attention and memory encoding in partial report: a dual-task approach
    B Giesbrecht
    Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
    Q J Exp Psychol A 54:695-725. 2001
    ..It is argued that encoding information into memory and response selection for the first task both require general-purpose processing. The results are discussed in terms of the functional relationship between attention and memory...
  9. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of return in location- and identity-based choice decision tasks
    J Pratt
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
    Percept Psychophys 59:964-71. 1997
    ..Overall, the results are consistent with the attentional, not the motor, explanation of inhibition of return...
  10. ncbi request reprint Cognitive Ethology and exploring attention in real-world scenes
    Daniel Smilek
    Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada
    Brain Res 1080:101-19. 2006
    ..This new approach, which we call Cognitive Ethology, focuses on understanding how attention operates in everyday situations and what people know and believe about attention...
  11. ncbi request reprint Taking the high road on subcortical transfer
    Michael B Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
    Brain Cogn 57:162-4. 2005
    ..This capacity of disconnected hemispheres to switch control of the response hand can create the illusion of subcortical transfer of higher-order information and must be taken into account in studies with split-brain patients...
  12. ncbi request reprint Integrating motion information across sensory modalities: the role of top-down factors
    Salvador Soto-Faraco
    ICREA and Parc Científic de Barcelona Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Prog Brain Res 155:273-86. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Attention to arrows: pointing to a new direction
    Jelena Ristic
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 59:1921-30. 2006
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Seeing trees OR seeing forests in simultanagnosia: attentional capture can be local or global
    Kirsten A Dalrymple
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Neuropsychologia 45:871-5. 2007
    ..Capture likely occurs because of a pathological restriction and/or rigidity of attention, but the type of capture depends upon the competitive balance between global and local salience...
  15. ncbi request reprint Eyes are special but not for everyone: the case of autism
    Jelena Ristic
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 24:715-8. 2005
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Visual attention and the semantics of space: beyond central and peripheral cues
    Bradley S Gibson
    Department of Psychology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:622-7. 2006
    ..The theoretical utility of this new distinction is discussed in the context of recent evidence suggesting that a variety of central cues can elicit reflexive orienting...
  17. ncbi request reprint Fixation offset and stop signal intensity effects on saccadic countermanding: a crossmodal investigation
    Sharon Morein-Zamir
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, V6T 1Z4 Vancouver, Canada
    Exp Brain Res 175:453-62. 2006
    ..The results provide new insights into the mechanisms of inhibition and help resolve previous inconsistencies in the literature...
  18. ncbi request reprint On audiovisual spatial synergy: the fragility of the phenomenon
    Salvador Soto-Faraco
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Percept Psychophys 67:444-57. 2005
    ..The implication is that individuals can select inputs from different modalities from different locations more easily than previously had been thought...
  19. ncbi request reprint Modularity and intersection of "what", "where" and "how" processing of visual stimuli: a new method of FMRI localization
    Ron Borowsky
    Cognitive Neuroimaging Lab, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada, S7N 5A5
    Brain Topogr 18:67-75. 2005
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Spatial orienting of tactile attention induced by social cues
    Salvador Soto-Faraco
    Icrea and Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Spain
    Psychon Bull Rev 12:1024-31. 2005
    ..This is the first demonstration that social attention cues have consequences that reach beyond their own sensory modality...
  21. ncbi request reprint Predictability influences stopping and response control
    Sharon Morein-Zamir
    Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 33:149-62. 2007
    ..These findings contrast with the established view that stopping is insensitive to expectancies. In addition, when trade-offs are prevented, these results confirm that stopping is representative of other response adjustment measures...
  22. ncbi request reprint Social attention and real-world scenes: the roles of action, competition and social content
    Elina Birmingham
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 61:986-98. 2008
    ..Our study also suggests a simple and surreptitious methodology for studying social attention to real-world stimuli in a range of populations, such as those with autism spectrum disorders...
  23. doi request reprint Turning the world around: patterns in saccade direction vary with picture orientation
    Tom Foulsham
    School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
    Vision Res 48:1777-90. 2008
    ..This demonstrates that a horizon bias is robust and affected by both the distribution of features and more global representations of the scene layout...
  24. doi request reprint Attentional SNARC: there's something special about numbers (let us count the ways)
    Michael D Dodd
    Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68516, USA
    Cognition 108:810-8. 2008
    ....
  25. doi request reprint Taking a long look at action and time perception
    Amelia R Hunt
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 34:125-36. 2008
    ..Moreover, voluntary action is neither necessary nor sufficient for overestimation effects. These results lead to a new interpretation of chronostasis based on the role of attention and memory in time estimation...
  26. doi request reprint Brain responses to biological relevance
    Christine M Tipper
    University of British Columbia
    J Cogn Neurosci 20:879-91. 2008
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint Attentional control and reflexive orienting to gaze and arrow cues
    Jelena Ristic
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 9660, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 14:964-9. 2007
    ..These data support the hypothesis that eye direction and arrow direction trigger similar reflexive shifts in spatial attention, but that the attention effect triggered by eye direction is more strongly reflexive...
  28. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of return: unraveling a paradox
    Elina Birmingham
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 14:957-63. 2007
    ..The farther the target location is away, the less similar it is to the cued location, and thus the less inhibition it receives...
  29. ncbi request reprint In sight, out of mind: the role of eye movements in the rapid resumption of visual search
    Wieske van Zoest
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Percept Psychophys 69:1204-17. 2007
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint The time course of attentional and oculomotor capture reveals a common cause
    Amelia R Hunt
    Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 33:271-84. 2007
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Measuring online volitional response control with a continuous tracking task
    Sharon Morein-Zamir
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver British Columbia, Canada
    Behav Res Methods 38:638-47. 2006
    ..Experiment 2 examines some of the issues that can be addressed using the new task. These results demonstrate the usefulness and potential of the task for gauging response control within the context of the stopping literature...
  32. ncbi request reprint The number line effect reflects top-down control
    Jelena Ristic
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 13:862-8. 2006
    ..Together, these data indicate that the spatial representations and attentional orienting related to the perception of digits are both fragile and flexible and depend critically on the top-down spatial mental sets adopted by individuals...
  33. ncbi request reprint Classification images of two right hemisphere patients: a window into the attentional mechanisms of spatial neglect
    Steven Shimozaki
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
    Brain Res 1080:26-52. 2006
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Does gaze direction really trigger a reflexive shift of spatial attention?
    Chris Kelland Friesen
    Department of Psychology, College of Science and Mathematics, North Dakota State University, P O Box 5075, Fargo, ND 58105 5075, USA
    Brain Cogn 57:66-9. 2005
    ..In both cases the facilitation effect was the same, demonstrating conclusively that the observed orienting is attributable to the reflexive effects of the gaze cue...
  35. ncbi request reprint Taking control of reflexive social attention
    Jelena Ristic
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Cognition 94:B55-65. 2005
    ..But top-down mechanisms are ineffective once IT involvement has been triggered. That is, once a stimulus has been seen as having eyes, it continues to be seen that way, and accordingly, the social attention effect persists...
  36. ncbi request reprint Time estimation: the effect of cortically mediated attention
    Anthony Chaston
    Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta, Canada T6G 2E9
    Brain Cogn 55:286-9. 2004
    ..And as the engagement of attention increased so did the underestimation of time. These findings provide strong support for an attentional model of prospective time estimation that is subserved by cortical brain mechanisms...
  37. ncbi request reprint Hemispheric performance in object-based attention
    Monica A Valsangkar-Smyth
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 11:84-91. 2004
    ..However, contrary to previous research, it appears that it is the right hemisphere, and not the left hemisphere, that is preferentially biased for committing object-based attention to elements in the visual environment...
  38. ncbi request reprint Attentional effects of counterpredictive gaze and arrow cues
    Chris Kelland Friesen
    Department of Psychology, North Dakota State University, ND, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 30:319-29. 2004
    ..The authors suggest that because there is a neural architecture specialized for processing eyes, gaze-triggered attention is more strongly reflexive than orienting to arrows...
  39. ncbi request reprint Integration of competing saccade programs
    Amelia R Hunt
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 19:206-8. 2004
    ..The other states that the strongest activation wins. We show that an eye movement is executed according to the strongest activation, with the competition being staged at a common subcortical site...
  40. ncbi request reprint Covert and overt voluntary attention: linked or independent?
    Amelia R Hunt
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 18:102-5. 2003
    ..Our study is consistent with general theories of attention that assume bottom-up (reflexive) processes and top-down (voluntary) processes converge on a common neural architecture...
  41. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of return: Dissociating attentional and oculomotor components
    Amelia R Hunt
    U British Columbia, Dept of Psychology, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 29:1068-74. 2003
    ..These 2 distinct components should be considered and studied separately, as well as in relation to each other, if a comprehensive theory of IOR is to be achieved. ((c) 2003 APA, all rights reserved)..
  42. ncbi request reprint Auditory capture of vision: examining temporal ventriloquism
    Sharon Morein-Zamir
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 17:154-63. 2003
    ..The results suggest a 'temporal ventriloquism' phenomenon analogous to spatial ventriloquism...
  43. ncbi request reprint Visual masking during the attentional blink: tests of the object substitution hypothesis
    Barry Giesbrecht
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 29:238-58. 2003
    ..Although masking by object substitution was observed, it did not interact with the AB. An alternative hypothesis is proposed stating that mostly early-stage visual processes mediate the masking effects that are critical to the AB...
  44. ncbi request reprint Covert and overt orienting to gaze direction cues and the effects of fixation offset
    Chris Kelland Friesen
    Depatment of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Neuroreport 14:489-93. 2003
    ..This is consistent with the view that gaze-triggered orienting is a unique form of reflexive orienting that depends crucially on cortical processes...
  45. ncbi request reprint A crossmodal attentional blink between vision and touch
    Salvador Soto-Faraco
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 9:731-8. 2002
    ..The contrast between our visuotactile results and those of previous audiovisual studies is discussed, as are the implications for current theories of the AB...
  46. ncbi request reprint Why are antisaccades slower than prosaccades? A novel finding using a new paradigm
    Bettina Olk
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Neuroreport 14:151-5. 2003
    ..The remaining difference is attributed to the reallocation of covert attention from the target location towards the opposite antisaccade location...
  47. ncbi request reprint Abrupt onsets and gaze direction cues trigger independent reflexive attentional effects
    Chris Kelland Friesen
    University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada
    Cognition 87:B1-10. 2003
    ..These findings strongly suggest that reflexive attention to gaze direction and reflexive inhibition to an abrupt onset are independent processes, and that gaze direction does not produce IOR at the gazed-at location...
  48. ncbi request reprint Are eyes special? It depends on how you look at it
    Jelena Ristic
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Psychon Bull Rev 9:507-13. 2002
    ..Together, these data provide important insight into the nature of the representations of directional stimuli involved in reflexive attentional orienting...
  49. ncbi request reprint Right hemisphere involvement in the attentional blink: evidence from a split-brain patient
    Barry Giesbrecht
    Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Brain Cogn 55:303-6. 2004
    ..However, the AB was more severe when the second target was presented to the RH. Our results are consistent with the notion that the right hemisphere plays a critical, but not unique, role in limited-capacity visual processing...
  50. ncbi request reprint Seeing the light: Adapting luminance reveals low-level visual processes in the attentional blink
    Barry Giesbrecht
    Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Brain Cogn 55:307-9. 2004
    ..Consistent with the involvement of low-level neural mechanisms, the AB effect interacted with adapting luminance such that an AB was revealed only under photopic (light adapted) viewing conditions...
  51. ncbi request reprint Congruency effects between auditory and tactile motion: extending the phenomenon of cross-modal dynamic capture
    Salvador Soto-Faraco
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 4:208-17. 2004
    ..The implications of these results are discussed in light of current findings regarding the representation of tactile and auditory space...
  52. ncbi request reprint Mislocalizations of touch to a fake hand
    Erin L Austen
    School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 4:170-81. 2004
    ..These findings indicate that the available sensory information is used flexibly to incorporate the rubber glove into the body schema...
  53. ncbi request reprint Attentional capture modulates perceptual sensitivity
    Jan Theeuwes
    Department of Cognitive Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Psychon Bull Rev 11:551-4. 2004
    ..In line with earlier claims, it is argued that the capture of attention by the irrelevant singleton causes a reduced sensory input at the target location...
  54. ncbi request reprint The effect of hemispatial neglect on the perception of centre
    Bettina Olk
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Cogn 55:365-7. 2004
    ..The results are in agreement with and provide the first clear evidence of an enlarged perceptual zone of indifference in patients with hemispatial visual neglect...
  55. ncbi request reprint Can semantic information be transferred between hemispheres in the split-brain?
    Marcia Grabowecky
    Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, 2029 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    Brain Cogn 55:310-3. 2004
    ..Our results indicate that any semantic interaction between the split hemispheres is not reliable. As such our study adds to the growing literature indicating that subcortical transfer of semantic information is more illusory than real...
  56. ncbi request reprint Multisensory executive functioning
    Amelia R Hunt
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Brain Cogn 55:325-7. 2004
    ..Current theories of executive function must be adapted to account for this finding. We also suggest that the present paradigm is amenable to future research aimed at determining precisely how modalities are linked within a task set...
  57. ncbi request reprint The ventriloquist in motion: illusory capture of dynamic information across sensory modalities
    Salvador Soto-Faraco
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, BC, V6T 1Z4, Vancouver, Canada
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 14:139-46. 2002
    ....
  58. ncbi request reprint Tactile "capture" of audition
    Anne Caclin
    University of Oxford, England
    Percept Psychophys 64:616-30. 2002
    ..Directing attention to the tactile modality did not increase the bias of sound localization toward synchronous tactile stimulation. These results provide the first demonstration of the tactile capture of audition...
  59. ncbi request reprint Influence of inter-item symmetry in visual search
    Alexa B Roggeveen
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Spat Vis 17:443-64. 2004
    ..Possible reasons for the unequal contributions of target-distractor and distractor-distractor relations are discussed...
  60. ncbi request reprint Modulation of antisaccades by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human frontal eye field
    Bettina Olk
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences, International University Bremen, Bremen, Germany
    Cereb Cortex 16:76-82. 2006
    ..This result is interpreted in terms of a modulation of saccade inhibition to the contralateral visual field due to disruption of processing in the FEF...
  61. ncbi request reprint Is inhibition of return a reflexive effect?
    Christine Tipper
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Cognition 97:B55-62. 2005
    ..We argue that an intimate link between fronto-parietal regions and the superior colliculus provide a functional neural mechanism for this volitional effect to impact IOR...
  62. ncbi request reprint Separable routes to human memory formation: dissociating task and material contributions in the prefrontal cortex
    Gagan S Wig
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, HB 6207 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 16:139-48. 2004
    ..These results demonstrate a posterior/anterior dichotomy in the frontal cortex that underlies separable code-based routes to human memory formation...
  63. ncbi request reprint Flexible and abstract resolutions to crossmodal conflicts
    Christa Lynn Donovan
    University of British Columbia, Canada
    Brain Cogn 56:1-4. 2004
    ..More importantly, they suggest that interactions between modalities can span to abstract levels of same/different representations...
  64. ncbi request reprint New reflections on visual search: Interitem symmetry matters!
    Wieske van Zoest
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Psychol Sci 17:535-42. 2006
    ..This finding is strong support for the view that visual search is guided by an analysis that considers interitem relations...
  65. ncbi request reprint Functional localization and double dissociations: the relationship between internal structure and behavior
    David A Medler
    Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States
    Brain Cogn 57:146-50. 2005
    ....
  66. ncbi request reprint Metacognition and change detection: do lab and life really converge?
    Daniel Smilek
    Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont, Canada N2L 3G1
    Conscious Cogn 17:1056-61. 2008
    ..We also discuss how this dialogue illustrates the need for psychological studies to be grounded in measurements taken from real world situations rather than laboratory experiments or questionnaires...
  67. ncbi request reprint Metacognitive errors in change detection: missing the gap between lab and life
    Daniel Smilek
    Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1
    Conscious Cogn 16:52-7; discussion 58-62. 2007
    ..We suggest several reasons why change detection findings like Beck et al.'s do not generalize to real world situations. More broadly, we suggest a possible way to bridge the gap between lab and life...
  68. ncbi request reprint Compatibility effects in stopping and response initiation in a continuous tracking task
    Sharon Morein-Zamir
    Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 59:2148-61. 2006
    ..These findings indicate that stopping, like response initiation, is influenced by stimulus-response properties such as compatibility. This in turn suggests that stopping is governed by constraints similar to those of other behaviours...