P W Hochachka

Summary

Affiliation: University of British Columbia
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. pmc The metabolic implications of intracellular circulation
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:12233-9. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Going malignant: the hypoxia-cancer connection in the prostate
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Bioessays 24:749-57. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Adaptation and conservation of physiological systems in the evolution of human hypoxia tolerance
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 124:1-17. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Mechanism and evolution of hypoxia-tolerance in humans
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    J Exp Biol 201:1243-54. 1998
  5. ncbi request reprint Pinniped diving response mechanism and evolution: a window on the paradigm of comparative biochemistry and physiology
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, BC, V6T 1Z4, Vancouver, Canada
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 126:435-58. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects on regional brain metabolism of high-altitude hypoxia: a study of six US marines
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology and Sports Medicine Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Am J Physiol 277:R314-9. 1999
  7. ncbi request reprint Two research paths for probing the roles of oxygen in metabolic regulation
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Braz J Med Biol Res 32:661-72. 1999
  8. ncbi request reprint Beta-fibrinogen allele frequencies in Peruvian Quechua, a high-altitude native population
    J L Rupert
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 109:181-6. 1999
  9. pmc Carbohydrate utilization during exercise after high-altitude acclimation: a new perspective
    G B McClelland
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:10288-93. 1998
  10. ncbi request reprint Effect of high-altitude acclimation on NEFA turnover and lipid utilization during exercise in rats
    G B McClelland
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Am J Physiol 277:E1095-102. 1999

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. pmc The metabolic implications of intracellular circulation
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:12233-9. 1999
    ..The ease with which this hypothesis explains the [s] stability paradox is one of its most compelling features...
  2. ncbi request reprint Going malignant: the hypoxia-cancer connection in the prostate
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Bioessays 24:749-57. 2002
    ..Recognition and understanding of these redox balancing and hypoxia defense functions may lead to new intervention strategies by developing new intracellular targets for prostate cancer therapy...
  3. ncbi request reprint Adaptation and conservation of physiological systems in the evolution of human hypoxia tolerance
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 124:1-17. 1999
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Mechanism and evolution of hypoxia-tolerance in humans
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    J Exp Biol 201:1243-54. 1998
    ..More recent evidence indicating that our species evolved under 'colder, drier and higher' conditions suggests that these adaptations may represent the 'ancestral' physiological condition for humans...
  5. ncbi request reprint Pinniped diving response mechanism and evolution: a window on the paradigm of comparative biochemistry and physiology
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, BC, V6T 1Z4, Vancouver, Canada
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 126:435-58. 2000
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects on regional brain metabolism of high-altitude hypoxia: a study of six US marines
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology and Sports Medicine Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Am J Physiol 277:R314-9. 1999
    ..The observed short-term hypoxia acclimation responses in these lowlanders clearly differ from the long-term hypoxia adaptations found in brain metabolism of people indigenous to high-altitude environments...
  7. ncbi request reprint Two research paths for probing the roles of oxygen in metabolic regulation
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Braz J Med Biol Res 32:661-72. 1999
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Beta-fibrinogen allele frequencies in Peruvian Quechua, a high-altitude native population
    J L Rupert
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Am J Phys Anthropol 109:181-6. 1999
    ..Frequencies in the Na-Dene, a Native American group unrelated to the Quechua, were not significantly different from those in Caucasians...
  9. pmc Carbohydrate utilization during exercise after high-altitude acclimation: a new perspective
    G B McClelland
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:10288-93. 1998
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Effect of high-altitude acclimation on NEFA turnover and lipid utilization during exercise in rats
    G B McClelland
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Am J Physiol 277:E1095-102. 1999
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Effect of brood size manipulation on offspring physiology: an experiment with passerine birds
    G P Burness
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    J Exp Biol 203:3513-20. 2000
    ..These individuals also had decreased activity of cardiac 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, suggesting a decreased capacity for oxidation of fatty acids. How these characters affect survival or the future adult phenotype remains unknown...
  12. ncbi request reprint Selective pressure has not acted against hypercoagulability alleles in high-altitude Amerindians
    J L Rupert
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B C, Canada
    Ann Hum Genet 67:426-32. 2003
    ..These data do not support the hypothesis that selection has acted to eliminate alleles associated with hypercoagulability in Andean highlanders...
  13. ncbi request reprint Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) allele frequencies in Amerindians
    M V Monsalve
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B C Canada
    Ann Hum Genet 67:367-71. 2003
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) alleles in the Quechua, a high altitude South American native population
    J L Rupert
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Ann Hum Biol 26:375-80. 1999
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Cellular metabolic homeostasis during large-scale change in ATP turnover rates in muscles
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    J Exp Biol 200:381-6. 1997
    ..The central regulatory question is how such homeostasis of key intermediates in pathways of energy supply and energy demand is achieved...
  16. ncbi request reprint Energy turnover in the normoxic and anoxic turtle heart
    P G Arthur
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Physiol 117:121-6. 1997
    ..We conclude that long-term cardiac tolerance of hypoxia in this species is more likely related to metabolic depression rather than to an exceptional anaerobic performance...
  17. ncbi request reprint Cardiovascular adaptations in Andean natives after 6 wk of exposure to sea level
    D C McKenzie
    Department of Sport Science, Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    J Appl Physiol 70:2650-5. 1991
    ..01). The results indicate that the removal of these high-altitude-adapted natives from 4,300 m to sea level for 6 wk results in only minor changes to the cardiac structure and function as measured by these noninvasive techniques...
  18. ncbi request reprint Genetic polymorphisms in the Renin-Angiotensin system in high-altitude and low-altitude Native American populations
    J L Rupert
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Ann Hum Genet 67:17-25. 2003
    ..There was no evidence for an over-representation of the RAS alleles associated with cardiovascular fitness in the high-altitude Amerindian population when compared to the lowland Amerindian population...
  19. ncbi request reprint The evidence for hereditary factors contributing to high altitude adaptation in Andean natives: a review
    J L Rupert
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4
    High Alt Med Biol 2:235-56. 2001
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Mechanism, origin, and evolution of anoxia tolerance in animals
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 130:435-59. 2001
    ..adaptable features in the evolution of the above hypoxia-response physiology in these two specific animal lineages...
  21. ncbi request reprint Allometric scaling of RNA, DNA, and enzyme levels: an intraspecific study
    G P Burness
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4
    Am J Physiol 277:R1164-70. 1999
    ..This was supported by a positive correlation between MyoD and PK mRNA levels (r(2) = 0.17, P < 0.05)...
  22. ncbi request reprint High-altitude acclimation increases the triacylglycerol/fatty acid cycle at rest and during exercise
    G B McClelland
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 281:E537-44. 2001
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Catecholamine stimulation of hepatic glycogenolysis during anoxia in the turtle Chrysemys picta
    K M Keiver
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Am J Physiol 261:R1341-5. 1991
    ..Hepatic glycogen mobilization during anoxia appeared to be stimulated via beta-adrenergic receptors, as propranolol was effective in blocking the stimulation, whereas phentolamine, an alpha-receptor antagonist, was not...
  24. ncbi request reprint Genetic approaches to understanding human adaptation to altitude in the Andes
    J L Rupert
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada V6T 2B5
    J Exp Biol 204:3151-60. 2001
    ..The principles and assumptions underlying the various approaches, as well as some of the inherent strengths and weaknesses of each, are briefly discussed...
  25. pmc Effects of forced diving on the spleen and hepatic sinus in northern elephant seal pups
    S J Thornton
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:9413-8. 2001
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Intracellular convection, homeostasis and metabolic regulation
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    J Exp Biol 206:2001-9. 2003
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint The lactate paradox in human high-altitude physiological performance
    P W Hochachka
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada
    News Physiol Sci 17:122-6. 2002
    ..This paradoxical situation may be caused mainly by upregulated metabolic control contributions from cell ATP demand and ATP supply pathways...
  28. ncbi request reprint Physiological and biochemical correlates of brood size and energy expenditure in tree swallows
    G P Burness
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1S6
    J Exp Biol 204:1491-501. 2001
    ..There was no correlation between either brood size or DEE and the mass of any internal organ or the metabolic capacity of the pectoral muscle...
  29. ncbi request reprint An (1)H-MRS evaluation of the phosphocreatine/creatine pool (tCr) in human muscle
    M E Trump
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T-1Z4
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 280:R889-96. 2001
    ..In addition, these data suggest that in (1)H-MRS studies whose goals include quantitative estimates of tCr pool sizes, standardized metabolic conditions or careful T(2) evaluations will be required...
  30. ncbi request reprint Beta2-adrenergic receptor allele frequencies in the Quechua, a high altitude native population
    J L Rupert
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Ann Hum Genet 64:135-43. 2000
    ..In addition, we sequenced the coding region of the gene in three unrelated Quechua to determine if there were any other polymorphisms common in this population. None were detected...