Janine Giese-Davis

Summary

Affiliation: University of Calgary
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Which symptoms matter? Self-report and observer discrepancies in repressors and high-anxious women with metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA, 94305 5718, USA
    J Behav Med 37:22-36. 2014
  2. pmc Screening for distress, the 6th vital sign: common problems in cancer outpatients over one year in usual care: associations with marital status, sex, and age
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Canada
    BMC Cancer 12:441. 2012
  3. pmc Decrease in depression symptoms is associated with longer survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a secondary analysis
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Clin Oncol 29:413-20. 2011
  4. pmc Does improving mood in depressed patients alter factors that may affect cardiovascular disease risk?
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical Center, 401 Quarry Rd, Room 1316, Stanford, CA 94305 5722, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 43:1246-52. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Depression and stress reactivity in metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:675-83. 2006
  6. doi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on pain in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Health Psychol 28:579-87. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Psychophysiological and cortisol responses to psychological stress in depressed and nondepressed older men and women with elevated cardiovascular disease risk
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5722, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:538-46. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Emotional expression and diurnal cortisol slope in women with metastatic breast cancer in supportive-expressive group therapy: a preliminary study
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Biol Psychol 73:190-8. 2006
  9. doi request reprint What goes up does not always come down: patterns of distress, physical and psychosocial morbidity in people with cancer over a one year period
    Linda E Carlson
    Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Psychooncology 22:168-76. 2013
  10. ncbi request reprint Change in emotion-regulation strategy for women with metastatic breast cancer following supportive-expressive group therapy
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 70:916-25. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi request reprint Which symptoms matter? Self-report and observer discrepancies in repressors and high-anxious women with metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA, 94305 5718, USA
    J Behav Med 37:22-36. 2014
    ..Physicians rated both groups as coping significantly better than others. Future research might productively study physician-patient interaction in these groups. ..
  2. pmc Screening for distress, the 6th vital sign: common problems in cancer outpatients over one year in usual care: associations with marital status, sex, and age
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Canada
    BMC Cancer 12:441. 2012
    ..Specifically, we examined whether marital status, sex, age, and their interactions predicted these trajectories. We did not actively triage or refer patients in this study in order to examine the natural course of problem reports...
  3. pmc Decrease in depression symptoms is associated with longer survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a secondary analysis
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Clin Oncol 29:413-20. 2011
    ..However, few studies have assessed whether changes in depression symptoms are associated with survival...
  4. pmc Does improving mood in depressed patients alter factors that may affect cardiovascular disease risk?
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical Center, 401 Quarry Rd, Room 1316, Stanford, CA 94305 5722, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 43:1246-52. 2009
    ..The normal controls exhibited no change in the variables measured during the same time. A significant improvement in mood may have little impact on most traditional or atypical risk factors, cortisol or cardiophysiology...
  5. ncbi request reprint Depression and stress reactivity in metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:675-83. 2006
    ..This study investigated how depression affects MBC stress reactivity, including autonomic (ANS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function...
  6. doi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on pain in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Health Psychol 28:579-87. 2009
    ..To examine whether a group intervention including hypnosis can reduce cancer pain and trait hypnotizability would moderate these effects...
  7. ncbi request reprint Psychophysiological and cortisol responses to psychological stress in depressed and nondepressed older men and women with elevated cardiovascular disease risk
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5722, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:538-46. 2006
    ..The objective of this study was to compare psychophysiological and cortisol reactions to psychological stress in older depressed and nondepressed patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD)...
  8. ncbi request reprint Emotional expression and diurnal cortisol slope in women with metastatic breast cancer in supportive-expressive group therapy: a preliminary study
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Biol Psychol 73:190-8. 2006
    ....
  9. doi request reprint What goes up does not always come down: patterns of distress, physical and psychosocial morbidity in people with cancer over a one year period
    Linda E Carlson
    Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Psychooncology 22:168-76. 2013
    ..This study longitudinally examined patients' physical and psychosocial concerns over the year following diagnosis...
  10. ncbi request reprint Change in emotion-regulation strategy for women with metastatic breast cancer following supportive-expressive group therapy
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 70:916-25. 2002
    ..Even though these aspects of emotion-regulation appear trait-like within the control group, significant change was observed with treatment...
  11. ncbi request reprint Repression and high anxiety are associated with aberrant diurnal cortisol rhythms in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Health Psychol 23:645-50. 2004
    ..Diurnal slope was similar for repressers and high-anxious groups. Groups did not differ on mean cortisol levels, nor did they differ on intercept (morning) values...
  12. doi request reprint Marital status predicts change in distress and well-being in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer and their peer counselors
    Lynne Wittenberg
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Breast J 16:481-9. 2010
    ..In addition to providing ongoing training and emotional support to navigators, our findings indicate the importance of providing additional support for women who are not married or partnered...
  13. pmc Stress sensitivity in metastatic breast cancer: analysis of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 31:1231-44. 2006
    ..21, p=.04, N=95). Our general findings suggest that flatter daytime cortisol slopes among metastatic breast cancer patients may be related to disrupted feedback inhibition rather than hypersensitivity in response to stimulation...
  14. doi request reprint Trait mindfulness, repression, suppression, and self-reported mood and stress symptoms among women with breast cancer
    Rie Tamagawa
    University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta, Canada
    J Clin Psychol 69:264-77. 2013
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Mood disturbance in community cancer support groups. The role of emotional suppression and fighting spirit
    Matthew J Cordova
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Psychosom Res 55:461-7. 2003
    ....
  16. pmc Actigraphy-Measured Sleep Disruption as a Predictor of Survival among Women with Advanced Breast Cancer
    Oxana Palesh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
    Sleep 37:837-42. 2014
    ..Using a prospective research design, this study aimed to clarify the relationship between objective measures of sleep efficiency and sleep disruption with survival among women with advanced breast cancer...
  17. ncbi request reprint Design decisions to optimize reliability of daytime cortisol slopes in an older population
    Helena C Kraemer
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 14:325-33. 2006
    ..How best to estimate that slope with minimal burden to the participants and the cost of the study is a decision often made without empiric foundation...
  18. ncbi request reprint Traumatic stress symptoms among women with recently diagnosed primary breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Stress 15:277-87. 2002
    ..Furthermore, these results suggest women at greatest risk are those who are younger, who receive postsurgical cancer treatment, who are low in emotional self-efficacy and whose lives are most affected by having cancer...
  19. ncbi request reprint The effect of peer counseling on quality of life following diagnosis of breast cancer: an observational study
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Psychooncology 15:1014-22. 2006
    ..Randomized clinical trials are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of peer navigator programs...
  20. ncbi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer: a randomized prospective trial
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Cancer 110:1130-8. 2007
    ..Subsequent findings concerning the question of whether such psychosocial support affects survival have been mixed...
  21. pmc Exercise and nutrition for head and neck cancer patients: a patient oriented, clinic-supported randomized controlled trial
    Lauren C Capozzi
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, KNB 2229 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada
    BMC Cancer 12:446. 2012
    ..Our pilot work suggests that there is large patient demand and clinic support from the health care professionals for a comprehensive program...
  22. ncbi request reprint Detecting emotional expression in face-to-face and online breast cancer support groups
    Anna Liess
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 76:517-23. 2008
    ..They found correlations were low for Positive Affect but moderate for negative affect between Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) and video coding. The implications of utilizing text-only detection of emotion are discussed...
  23. ncbi request reprint Depression and cancer: mechanisms and disease progression
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 54:269-82. 2003
    ..Depression also affects components of immune function that may affect cancer surveillance. Thus, there is evidence of a bidirectional relationship between cancer and depression, offering new opportunities for therapeutic intervention...