Mark S Boyce

Summary

Affiliation: University of Alberta
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bet-hedging applications for conservation
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    J Biosci 27:385-92. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Demography in an increasingly variable world
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2E9
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:141-8. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Grizzly bear habitat selection is scale dependent
    Lana M Ciarniello
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ecol Appl 17:1424-40. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Managing moose harvests by the seat of your pants
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2E9, Canada
    Theor Popul Biol 82:340-7. 2012
  5. pmc Temporal autocorrelation functions for movement rates from global positioning system radiotelemetry data
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E9
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:2213-9. 2010
  6. pmc Humans strengthen bottom-up effects and weaken trophic cascades in a terrestrial food web
    Tyler B Muhly
    Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e64311. 2013
  7. pmc Effects of humans on behaviour of wildlife exceed those of natural predators in a landscape of fear
    Simone Ciuti
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 7:e50611. 2012
  8. pmc Does learning or instinct shape habitat selection?
    Scott E Nielsen
    Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e53721. 2013
  9. ncbi request reprint Willow on Yellowstone's northern range: evidence for a trophic cascade?
    Hawthorne L Beyer
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ecol Appl 17:1563-71. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Habitat selection predicts genetic relatedness in an alpine ungulate
    Aaron B A Shafer
    Department of Biological Sciences, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ecology 93:1317-29. 2012

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi request reprint Bet-hedging applications for conservation
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    J Biosci 27:385-92. 2002
    ..Similarly, by restoring grizzly bears to the Bitterroot wilderness of Idaho and Montana can reduce the probability of extinction for grizzly bears in the Rocky Mountains of the United States by as much as 69-93%...
  2. ncbi request reprint Demography in an increasingly variable world
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2E9
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:141-8. 2006
    ..We also highlight new tools for anticipating the consequences of the magnitude and temporal patterning of environmental variability...
  3. ncbi request reprint Grizzly bear habitat selection is scale dependent
    Lana M Ciarniello
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ecol Appl 17:1424-40. 2007
    ..From a management perspective, decisions should be based on a hierarchical process of habitat selection, recognizing that selection patterns vary across scales...
  4. ncbi request reprint Managing moose harvests by the seat of your pants
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2E9, Canada
    Theor Popul Biol 82:340-7. 2012
    ..Because conservation dollars are usually limited, the high cost of aerial surveys is difficult to justify when alternative methods exist...
  5. pmc Temporal autocorrelation functions for movement rates from global positioning system radiotelemetry data
    Mark S Boyce
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E9
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:2213-9. 2010
    ..In contrast, step lengths of elk are consistently periodic, reflecting crepuscular activity...
  6. pmc Humans strengthen bottom-up effects and weaken trophic cascades in a terrestrial food web
    Tyler B Muhly
    Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e64311. 2013
    ..Instead, human influence on vegetation may strengthen bottom-up predominance and weaken top-down trophic cascades in ecosystems. We suggest that human influences on ecosystems may usurp top-down and bottom-up effects...
  7. pmc Effects of humans on behaviour of wildlife exceed those of natural predators in a landscape of fear
    Simone Ciuti
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 7:e50611. 2012
    ..We measured the effects of human activities compared to predator and other environmental factors on the behaviour of elk (Cervus elaphus Linnaeus 1758) in a human-dominated landscape in Alberta, Canada...
  8. pmc Does learning or instinct shape habitat selection?
    Scott E Nielsen
    Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e53721. 2013
    ..These results suggest that habitat selection in grizzly bears are partly learned from their mothers, which could have implications for the translocation of wildlife to novel environments...
  9. ncbi request reprint Willow on Yellowstone's northern range: evidence for a trophic cascade?
    Hawthorne L Beyer
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ecol Appl 17:1563-71. 2007
    ..We suggest that the community-altering effects of wolf restoration are an endorsement of ecological-process management in Yellowstone National Park...
  10. ncbi request reprint Habitat selection predicts genetic relatedness in an alpine ungulate
    Aaron B A Shafer
    Department of Biological Sciences, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ecology 93:1317-29. 2012
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Bacterial populations and metabolites in the feces of free roaming and captive grizzly bears
    Clarissa Schwab
    Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, 4 10 Ag For Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Can J Microbiol 55:1335-46. 2009
    ..A consistent data set was obtained that associated fecal microbiota and metabolites with the distinctive gut physiology and diet of grizzly bears...
  12. ncbi request reprint Forecasting spatially structured populations: the role of dispersal and scale
    Cailin Xu
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9 Canada
    J Theor Biol 233:177-89. 2005
    ..Improved understanding of dispersal can enhance the management and conservation of natural resources, and may help us to understand resource-exploitation strategies employed by local indigenous humans...
  13. pmc Perception of human-derived risk influences choice at top of the food chain
    Bogdan Cristescu
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e82738. 2013
    ..Although grizzly bears are presently not hunted in Alberta, their perceived risks associated with humans influence resting-site selection...
  14. pmc Focusing ecological research for conservation
    Bogdan Cristescu
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada
    Ambio 42:805-15. 2013
    ..Trophic-level interactions, driving ecological dynamics at the ecosystem-level. Addressing these will require cross-disciplinary research under the overarching framework of conservation ecology. ..
  15. pmc Human selection of elk behavioural traits in a landscape of fear
    Simone Ciuti
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Proc Biol Sci 279:4407-16. 2012
    ..Human hunting could evoke exploitation-induced evolutionary change, which, in turn, might oppose adaptive responses to natural and sexual selection...
  16. doi request reprint Predicting deer-vehicle collisions in an urban area
    Rob Found
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada
    J Environ Manage 92:2486-93. 2011
    ..These models can help wildlife and transportation managers to identify locations of high collision frequency for mitigation. Modifying certain landscape and roadside habitats can be an effective way to reduce deer-vehicle collisions...
  17. ncbi request reprint Linking occurrence and fitness to persistence: habitat-based approach for endangered greater sage-grouse
    Cameron L Aldridge
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
    Ecol Appl 17:508-26. 2007
    ..This novel approach to habitat-based population viability modeling has merit for many species of concern...
  18. ncbi request reprint Harvesting in seasonal environments
    Cailin Xu
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada
    J Math Biol 50:663-82. 2005
    ..S.Y. Finding an optimal harvest strategy for this case and to explore harvesting in populations that follow other growth models (e.g., involving predation or age structure) will be an interesting but challenging problem...
  19. doi request reprint Selection, use, choice and occupancy: clarifying concepts in resource selection studies
    Subhash R Lele
    Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G1, Canada
    J Anim Ecol 82:1183-91. 2013
    ..5. In this paper, we attempt to clarify the concepts and terminology used in animal resource studies by illustrating the relationships among these various concepts and providing their statistical underpinnings...
  20. ncbi request reprint Longevity can buffer plant and animal populations against changing climatic variability
    William F Morris
    Biology Department, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0338, USA
    Ecology 89:19-25. 2008
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Landscape heterogeneity shapes predation in a newly restored predator-prey system
    Matthew J Kauffman
    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:690-700. 2007
    ..Elk in this newly restored predator-prey system should be able to mediate their risk of predation by movement and habitat selection across a heterogeneous risk landscape...
  22. pmc Lifetime reproductive success and density-dependent, multi-variable resource selection
    Philip D McLoughlin
    University of Saskatchewan, Department of Biology Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada
    Proc Biol Sci 273:1449-54. 2006
    ..We discuss the relevance of these results to our understanding of the spatial distribution of red deer abundance, and potential applications of our approach to evolutionary and applied ecology...
  23. ncbi request reprint Elk winter foraging at fine scale in Yellowstone National Park
    Daniel Fortin
    Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Sainte Foy, QC, G1K 7P4, Canada
    Oecologia 145:335-43. 2005
    ..Second, elk tended to forage perpendicularly to aspect, resulting in horizontal displacements. Our study demonstrates that free-ranging elk adjust their foraging to fine-scale habitat structure...